2012 rMBP vs. MBP prices

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by dhazeghi, Feb 21, 2014.

  1. dhazeghi macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    #1
    Good afternoon,

    I've been looking for an upgrade for my 2011 MBA 13 (1.7GHZ/4GB/128GB) to remove the USB 2.0 bottleneck for external storage (considered Thunderbolt, but it's cheaper to just buy a newer machine). Originally I was just considering 2012 MBP 13 (non-retina), but looking at pricing on eBay, I saw a number of 2012 rMBP 13s going for about the same amount ($850 or so). I was wondering what the explanation was, considering that the rMBP design is the same age and sold for $500 more when it came out ($1700 vs. $1200)? Aside from upgradability, are there any real disadvantages to the rMBP over the plain MBP 13? Thanks.
     
  2. Dovahkiing macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2013
    #2
    My best guess would be that the expensive HD upgrades and the non-upgradable RAM is what's keeping it similarly valued as the cMBP. Just because something was $500 more when new doesn't mean it's always $500 more valuable on the used market, that's just where the market has settled right now. I'd say go for the rMBP.
     
  3. accountforit macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    #3
    A lot of people still want the CD/DVD drive and the cMBP's you are looking at have more storage as well. Some people still care about those things over retina and the seconds saved with flash.

    The 2012 13" retina's aren't as sought after as the new retinas because they changed a lot this year. They got smaller, improved battery life, and went to PCIe flash storage.
     
  4. dhazeghi thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    #4
    Yes, I agree that upgradability counts for something. I guess I'm just a little surprised that it would make a 40% difference in depreciation.

    Fair point. I guess that leaves with the dilemma of deciding whether those people are right or not! I've been pretty happy with the Air, so I'm not dying for upgradability. Question is whether in 3 or 4 years, 8GB RAM and a 240GB SSD would be enough. Decisions...
     
  5. Roadracer247 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2014
    #5
    In 3-4 years all of these will be outdated. It'll be time for a new computer. Just the nature of the beast IMO...

    At least Apple computers have higher than normal resale value.
     
  6. Count Blah macrumors 68030

    Count Blah

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    US of A
    #6
    Try selling a 64gig iPad versus a 16gig iPad of the same version. You never make anywhere close to the price difference back.

    Expandability does mean a lot, no matter what Ive and his thin disciples tell you.
     
  7. dhazeghi thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    #7
    I'll grant you that's how it's been, but looking at the desktop side of things, real improvements have slowed enormously. I've sitting at a 4-year old desktop right now, and it's surprising just how up-to-date it feels. I hope we do continue to see major progress in laptop performance, but I wouldn't be surprised if things stagnate there too.

    Oh, I like expandability, no question about that! But I also like thin, thus my dilemma. Now if any 13" MacBook Air or MacBook Pro had an ExpressCard slot, the choice would be easy!
     
  8. accountforit macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2014
    #8
    Resale value of a Macbook Pro is a totally different scenario vs. and iPad.
     
  9. Count Blah macrumors 68030

    Count Blah

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    US of A
    #9
    I think I took out another sentence. Basically, then it comes to apple products, there are certain niches, where you simply do not make back the extra investment. iPads, lowest level new rMBP versus earlier versions, and others that maintain a high resale value - 17" mbp and smaller size upgradeable iMacs.
     

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