2014 MBA overheating

.ImNuMBeR1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 30, 2012
26
0
Cambridge, UK
Hi.

So I purchased a MacBook Air 128GB 2014 model on the 19th on this month, and received and set it up on the 20th. During it's first setup and downloading the OS X 10.10.2 update, according to HWMonitor my Mac was overheating on over 5 different sensors. CPU 1 & 2, CEPI (?) GPU all at 92'C and Pipeline Air Flow In/Out at 127'C etc. I'm not sure if it was HWMonitor giving false temperature readings or what, but when using "smcFanControl" the CPU temperature is only 29-35C. So I'm rather confused.

What are the BEST recommended apps for monitoring temperatures (where I can have it in the menu bar) I should use for my Mac? - Apparently Temperature Gauge gives false readings too according to reviews.

Thank you in advance for help. :)

 

motrek

macrumors 68020
Sep 14, 2012
2,317
118
Hi.

So I purchased a MacBook Air 128GB 2014 model on the 19th on this month, and received and set it up on the 20th. During it's first setup and downloading the OS X 10.10.2 update, according to HWMonitor my Mac was overheating on over 5 different sensors. CPU 1 & 2, CEPI (?) GPU all at 92'C and Pipeline Air Flow In/Out at 127'C etc. I'm not sure if it was HWMonitor giving false temperature readings or what, but when using "smcFanControl" the CPU temperature is only 29-35C. So I'm rather confused.

What are the BEST recommended apps for monitoring temperatures (where I can have it in the menu bar) I should use for my Mac? - Apparently Temperature Gauge gives false readings too according to reviews.

Thank you in advance for help. :)

Image
Did the computer feel hot? Was the fan making a ton of noise?

If not, I'm not inclined to believe the program you were using.

I use smcFanControl and I like it.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
If the machine doesn't turn itself off, then it isn't overheating. Third party temperature sensor programs can be highly inaccurate or be miscalibrated.
 

Meister

Suspended
Oct 10, 2013
5,455
4,265
Nothing unusual. A while ago I downloaded windows on a 2013 mba and it got boiling hot around the hinges.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
my Mac was overheating on over 5 different sensors.
If you're not already doing so, use iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) to get accurate readings of your temps, fan speeds, etc., rather than relying on your sense of touch or sound. A forum member has posted a copy of iStat Pro that has been "tweaked" to enhance compatibility with recent OS X versions. You can download it here.
The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (GPU Tjmax may vary with specific models.)(Source: Intel)
Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.
It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
The fans in Macs are always on when the Mac is on, spinning at a minimum speed which varies by Mac model. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)
The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is on the back of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best. For Flash-related issues:
 

.ImNuMBeR1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 30, 2012
26
0
Cambridge, UK
Sounds faulty. I have a 2013 MBA, and I think the fan has only come on about twice since I bought it.
It does "sound" like it may be faulty but I highly doubt it. Thanks for your input though, greatly appreciated even though that's not the case. :O
Did the computer feel hot? Was the fan making a ton of noise?

If not, I'm not inclined to believe the program you were using.

I use smcFanControl and I like it.
Before I downloaded smcFanControl I couldn't hear the fan. The computer did not feel hot at all. Just a tiny bit warm (as you'd expect it to be given the fact it was updating and installing the "preinstalled apps" at the same time. (iMovie, iPhoto, Numbers, Pages, etc.) on the top center part of the keyboard. It wasn't warm enough to be considered "hot".
If the machine doesn't turn itself off, then it isn't overheating. Third party temperature sensor programs can be highly inaccurate or be miscalibrated.
It definitely hasn't turned itself off nor has it slowed down or frozen/halted yet. I do occasionally get the spinning beach ball when some apps load at the same time, but only for a maximum of 5 to 8 seconds.
Nothing unusual. A while ago I downloaded windows on a 2013 mba and it got boiling hot around the hinges.
Why would you want to install Windows on a Mac anyway? lol
 

joshlalonde

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2014
422
0
Canada
Sometimes your work requirements are such that you require Windows. But if it's not a constant need then a VM is the way to go. Or if you need Windows a bit more often but not enough to replace OS X, then bootcamp is the way to go.

Anyways, you shouldn't use those apps to tell, use your own 'sensors' and figure it out. Your computer isn't over-heating if it's just a little warm. I'd have thought you were talking about the fans were spinning loudly and it was so hot you couldn't touch it, it started shutting off, etc.

:p
 

.ImNuMBeR1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 30, 2012
26
0
Cambridge, UK
Sometimes your work requirements are such that you require Windows. But if it's not a constant need then a VM is the way to go. Or if you need Windows a bit more often but not enough to replace OS X, then bootcamp is the way to go.

Anyways, you shouldn't use those apps to tell, use your own 'sensors' and figure it out. Your computer isn't over-heating if it's just a little warm. I'd have thought you were talking about the fans were spinning loudly and it was so hot you couldn't touch it, it started shutting off, etc.

:p
I took it to the Apple store in Highcross, Leicester yesterday and the Genius' guy said that 90'C temps were "normal"... I called BS because no temps that high on a computer are "normal", however I am aware that Mac's are of great design for both performance and quality.

What would the members of MR recommend for a realtime legitimately accurate temperature monitoring app?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
I took it to the Apple store in Highcross, Leicester yesterday and the Genius' guy said that 90'C temps were "normal"... I called BS because no temps that high on a computer are "normal",
It is, indeed, normal for a Mac to safely reach such temps under heavy workloads. As already stated,
What would the members of MR recommend for a realtime legitimately accurate temperature monitoring app?
I already answered that in the first part of my previous post.
 

Boyd01

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 21, 2012
4,200
1,876
New Jersey Pine Barrens
If the machine doesn't turn itself off, then it isn't overheating.
I would have to agree. Never bothered to monitor the heat with any software. The fans only kick in when doing something CPU intensive like ripping a DVD or rendering in Final Cut Pro. Other than that, my 2013 MBA fans are never noticeable. On my old 2011 MBA, the fans ran much louder and more often.

Just enjoy the new machine and stop trying to find problems that don't exist. If you have an actual problem, it should be pretty obvious and the warranty should cover it.
 

motrek

macrumors 68020
Sep 14, 2012
2,317
118
I took it to the Apple store in Highcross, Leicester yesterday and the Genius' guy said that 90'C temps were "normal"... I called BS because no temps that high on a computer are "normal", however I am aware that Mac's are of great design for both performance and quality.
...
I understand the sentiment.

I used to be in the build-your-own PC scene where people were fanatical about overclocking and cooling and monitoring their temperatures. It was common for people to have heatsinks the size of a baby's head and conventional wisdom was that you wanted your CPU temperature to stay below maybe 40C and anything over 70C meant your computer was about to catch fire and explode.

But there have been improvements made to chip packaging over the years and it turns out that DIY hobbyists aren't necessarily experts on material science.

The CPUs in the current MBA are specified by Intel to have a maximum Tjunction temperature of 100C, meaning that they will run indefinitely at that temperature without it being a problem.

The MBA will spin up its fan to keep the CPU under that temperature, and if the fan can't cool the CPU well enough, the CPU will lower its clock speed to maintain a "safe" temperature. And if that doesn't work, the computer will shut down before any damage is done. So, no need to worry about any of this.
 

cbautis2

macrumors 6502a
Aug 17, 2013
718
577
I understand the sentiment.

I used to be in the build-your-own PC scene where people were fanatical about overclocking and cooling and monitoring their temperatures. It was common for people to have heatsinks the size of a baby's head and conventional wisdom was that you wanted your CPU temperature to stay below maybe 40C and anything over 70C meant your computer was about to catch fire and explode.

But there have been improvements made to chip packaging over the years and it turns out that DIY hobbyists aren't necessarily experts on material science.

The CPUs in the current MBA are specified by Intel to have a maximum Tjunction temperature of 100C, meaning that they will run indefinitely at that temperature without it being a problem.

The MBA will spin up its fan to keep the CPU under that temperature, and if the fan can't cool the CPU well enough, the CPU will lower its clock speed to maintain a "safe" temperature. And if that doesn't work, the computer will shut down before any damage is done. So, no need to worry about any of this.
Lets say CPU can run 99 degrees C all day long. I doubt the motherboard can last for months running at that temp continuously. Then again, some manufacturers have sensors on motherboard to throttle the CPU even if the CPU isn't reaching 100 degrees yet. Lenovo is one of those manufacturers that throttle the CPU well below its junction temp to ensure their motherboard don't crap out.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
Lets say CPU can run 99 degrees C all day long. I doubt the motherboard can last for months running at that temp continuously. Then again, some manufacturers have sensors on motherboard to throttle the CPU even if the CPU isn't reaching 100 degrees yet. Lenovo is one of those manufacturers that throttle the CPU well below its junction temp to ensure their motherboard don't crap out.
I have a 2007 Mac Mini that has been running at 100% with temperatures at 105C since 2009. Modern computers are much more resilient that most people believe.
 

Woochoo

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2014
343
150
90-95ºC wouldn't be normal if you were using it just for writting a doc or playing music, but under heavy loads it's normal
 

motrek

macrumors 68020
Sep 14, 2012
2,317
118
Lets say CPU can run 99 degrees C all day long. I doubt the motherboard can last for months running at that temp continuously. Then again, some manufacturers have sensors on motherboard to throttle the CPU even if the CPU isn't reaching 100 degrees yet. Lenovo is one of those manufacturers that throttle the CPU well below its junction temp to ensure their motherboard don't crap out.
What about a motherboard do you think might fail at such temperatures?

The wiring isn't going to melt--the melting point of copper is over 1000C. I don't know if your typical motherboard is made of fiberglass these days or something else but FR-4 is specified to 140C. So I don't know what you think is going to fail?

I can understand your concern. 100C is obviously a pretty concerning temperature to a human being. But we're not talking about human beings, we're talking about chips and boards and metal and stuff.
 

joshlalonde

macrumors 6502
Jul 12, 2014
422
0
Canada
Nah, even if you ran your computer at 90C daily, it won't poop out on you that fast. It's meant to operate under that temperature, anyways.. If it's hotter than about 110C if I remember correctly, you've exceeded your maximum safe temperature. But it would shut off before that happened anyways.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,360
701
This is old info.

Modern processors (Sandy Bridge or newer) reduce either their frequency or the number of active cores (sometimes both) to prevent overheating.
It's not old information. Even in older processors, throttling measures were implemented before shutdown. The same is true for current processors, which will shut down if reducing frequency or active cores does not bring temps down sufficiently.