2014 MBP13" 90+Celcius under load..

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Diversion, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. Diversion macrumors 6502a

    Diversion

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2007
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #1
    Idles at around 29c to 31c.. Which is very impressive for it's size but then it goes nearly to 100c under Handbrake load.. I'm not fearful that my machine has a problem, I am sure this is normal but anybody else seeing crazy temps like this? Under Windows with Prime95 it will hit 100c in about 1 minute and throttle back constantly.. So strange Apple is okay with running these CPUs to their thermal limits so easily.

    It's the new i5-4308U @ 2.8ghz..
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #2
    Those temperatures are normal and nothing to worry about.
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    If you're not already doing so, use iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) to get accurate readings of your temps, fan speeds, etc., rather than relying on your sense of touch or sound. A forum member has posted a copy of iStat Pro that has been "tweaked" to enhance compatibility with recent OS X versions. You can download it here.
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)
    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.
    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)
    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best. For Flash-related issues:
     
  4. Diversion thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Diversion

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2007
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #4
    You seem to spam this in every thread, iStat Menus already installed and thats where I get my temps from. I figured this was all normal for Apple machines but the trade off is less fan noise for more heat, bouncing off 100c causes the thermal throttle to kick in making the CPU slower for long tasks under load.. I figured they would crank the fan up faster to keep the CPU from throttling but we all know Apple values a silent computer (as do I).

    Oh well, as long as i'm not the ONLY person with a 100c temp MBP13!
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    It's not spam. It is a collection of facts that directly address the topic of this thread. The reason you see it frequently is many people post threads on the same topic, asking the same questions, rather than simply reading or posting in existing threads on the topic.
     
  6. Diversion thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Diversion

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2007
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #6
    I'm usually a major advocate to tell people to search but when you do and rarely find specifics.. I was more interested to know if my temps were normal for the late 13/mid 14 models specifically. Most people do know max tjunction is 100-105C but that does not mean it's normal to run that hot all the time.. I'd prefer to see my machines run at least 20C cooler than that. Apple trusts Intel enough to allow the CPU to actually ride on it's maximum heat acceptance figures.
     
  7. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #7
    The average temps won't vary widely between years and models, but they will vary greatly based on the workload and environment, which is unique to each user. Some users, because of their workload, will routinely see temps in the 100C range, while others will rarely if ever see such temps. There are threads discussing methods of lowering temps, such as reapplying thermal paste, external cooling devices, etc. You may take a look at some of those.
     
  8. SarcasticJoe macrumors 6502a

    SarcasticJoe

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2013
    Location:
    Finland
    #8
    There's actually some dynamic adjustment that goes on as you use the machine and some time later they generally "learn" to have the fans kick in earlier.

    Machines generally don't go up to 90c+ except for short spikes before the fans kick in and after that it's down to the 70-80c range. If spikes go up to 100C then there's something genuinely wrong with your machine because the only machines that went that high even in spikes were the original 2006 Macbook Pro's and they had some serious heat related problems.

    Personally I use a program called smcFanControl to run the fans on my machine at a default speed of 2500 RPM rather than the usual 2000. It means my machine is less prone to small spikes and runs a bit cooler, but isn't any louder because you literally can't hear the difference between 2000 and 2500 RPM. If you want to, you can raise the default speed even higher the cost of making more noise.
     
  9. gim macrumors 6502

    gim

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2014
    #9
    Well, I can just speak for the 15" Haswell rMBP, but all the machines I've seen the last days/weeks are going easily over 90 degrees in CPU core temperature under load, and not just spikes. And there is absolutely no way they are staying below 90 under full load.
    Are all these machines, including my own one, faulty?
    All current rMBPs are showing such high temps. You can call it normal, or you can call it an issue.
     

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