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MisterAndrew

macrumors 68030
Sep 15, 2015
2,623
2,072
Portland, Ore.
They still have some Intel Macs in the pipeline for this year too, but I'm sure those will be the last. If it bugs you unload it while the prices are still good and wait for the Apple Silicon version.
 
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codehead1

macrumors regular
Oct 31, 2011
117
98
EOL (end of life) implies they aren't making them any more. Clearly not true. EOSL (end of service life) happens later, and that's when you don't get OS updates, etc. Both of these happen eventually to everything. If you want to say the Mac Pro is EOL, then everything out today is EOL.
 

jaro1

macrumors newbie
Oct 23, 2014
8
4
Warsaw, Poland
We don't know the performance of Apple chip yet, as they're still in development phase, so we cannot judge how they perform in pro applications. Including of pro apps code in the chip probably will help them in gain some performance and it's tempting feature for future versions. IMHO MacPro 8,1 with A chip will be announced earliest 2022-2023.
 
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QCassidy352

macrumors G4
Mar 20, 2003
11,955
5,823
Bay Area
They probably won't sell an Apple silicone Mac Pro until the end of the transition, maybe two years from now. Since most Mac Pro buyers are using them to earn a living, that's two years of real work that you can do before the new one lands. And, of course, apple will continue to support the current Mac Pro with both software updates and service for far longer than that. So I'm not sure I see the problem.
 

OkiRun

macrumors 65816
Oct 25, 2019
1,005
583
Japan
And I have seen written that the apple silicone Mac Pro won’t allow boot camp windows. So if important, then happy to have the 7,1
Always depends on workflow needs.
 

fendushi

macrumors member
Nov 20, 2007
39
29
They probably won't sell an Apple silicone Mac Pro until the end of the transition, maybe two years from now. Since most Mac Pro buyers are using them to earn a living, that's two years of real work that you can do before the new one lands. And, of course, apple will continue to support the current Mac Pro with both software updates and service for far longer than that. So I'm not sure I see the problem.

This is the most likely scenario.
 
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radus

macrumors 6502a
Jan 12, 2009
687
391
EOL - if you need it for a living, buy it now.
If not, there are Ryzen-PCs twice as fast for half the money.
 
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Deliro

macrumors 65816
Sep 20, 2011
1,133
1,294
Apple would need to start making a whole different line of processors to compete against the Xeon use cases. Which I don’t think will be anytime soon. They’ve already put in the R&D in their consumer level A processors so that’s a much more sensible and profitable transition.

I won’t get into the details of what a Xeon is capable of and intended for, because well, if you spend 9K on a Mac Pro you should already know. With that said, your Mac Pro is no where near end of life.
 

LeonPro

macrumors 6502a
Jul 23, 2002
875
458
The issue is people buy the Mac Pro thinking it's a regular high, priced desktop to be pitted against regular desktop PCs. The 2019 Mac Pro is a workstation and should be treated as such. It's for people and companies who depend on this kind of reliability and stability including down to the thoughtful design and killer silent performance of the engineered ventilation.

If you don't earn from it, then it's a luxury just like any luxury purchase. Which means at this point they shouldn't get to complain why their "luxury" purchase is old news. Of course it will hurt, they just blew a couple grand for something they aren't making anything off of it.

For the rest of us target consumers of this product, we make money from it. When this expense is recouped within a project or two, anything after is just pure profit from its use. And when the new ARM Mac Pro is released, we will invest in it all over again.

Sorry to be blunt, but if you have to complain you aren't the target market for this product. And that applies to all products.
 

lantree

macrumors member
Jul 22, 2010
85
136
Way things are in life

When i got my new car i knew next years model is on the drawing board
When i got my new phone i knew next years model is on the drawing board
When i got my new computer i knew next years model in on the drawing board.

Point is soon has you buy something the next version is allready being worked on.
Enjoy your machine and don't worry about tomorrow, the 7.1 is a beast of a computer and will be around for years.

Another point to you really want to be in the first wave of arm Mac’s ?
I am sticking with Intel Mac’s until they get everything sorted and bug free.
 

radus

macrumors 6502a
Jan 12, 2009
687
391
Every new software and hardware development is dangerous and sometimes it never works.

You should only buy what works for you at the moment.
Do not trust on something someone is trying bring to the market.

If the arm-mac will work for you it ill be ok and you can take it, if not let it be and buy something else.

Regarding the MacPro 7.1 and every Intel Mac ... they told that the platform is dead,
Buy it only if everything you need is perfectly working now. There will not be a future for Intel-Macs.
 

TiggrToo

macrumors 601
Aug 24, 2017
4,205
8,826
Out there...way out there
So basically my new $9,000 MacPro is now basically end of life, why would Apple even release this computer knowing that they were moving away from Intel, clearly they have been working on this transition for a few years. Very annoyed.

No its not. Not even remotely.

That's a huge amount of hyperbole you instilled into one sensationalist post.
 

StuAff

macrumors 6502
Aug 6, 2007
304
147
Portsmouth, UK
Far too much angst about obsolescence, unnecessarily, at the moment in this forum. Whatever you buy, whenever you buy it, there will be something faster/cheaper/more expandable sooner or later, and quite possibly already sitting in a development lab already. In the case of a 7,1, you'll most likely have at least 18 months before a replacement is even announced. It will not be obsolescent as far as Apple is concerned until 2025-26, even if it had gone off sale after Monday's news. OS support will be at least for the next couple of system versions, most likely longer, and all your existing software will run regardless. There's no Apple kill-switch to make you buy a new one. This transition is likely to be longer than the Intel one. That went faster than planned, much faster. Unlikely to be repeated this time, Apple's timings seem ambitious on paper. In the meantime, you've got this rather splendid box to enjoy using and presumably get some work done on. So do that instead of fretting about this. And remember how much use many of us in this section of the forum (let alone the PPC/Vintage guys) are still getting very good use of MPs 1,1 to 5,1.
 

StuAff

macrumors 6502
Aug 6, 2007
304
147
Portsmouth, UK
Yes and we love the old MPs because they are X86-64 powered OPEN systems and able to run Windows and Linux out of the Box or inside a VM (without any restrictive "security chip").
T2 is hardly that restrictive. Disable the Secure Boot functionality, once, and you're done. And it wouldn't prevent Win 10 being installed anyway.
 

Ethosik

Contributor
Oct 21, 2009
6,135
4,724
Sorry, but no way would I want a first gen ARM MacPro. My 2019 MacPro will be my powerhouse for the next 4-5 years.

Agreed. I am going to replace my i9 2019 iMac with the 2019 Mac Pro in the next few months. Running bootcamp part of the time is required for me, and that is up in the air with Apple Silicon. I am getting a system that will last about 5 years.
 

LeonPro

macrumors 6502a
Jul 23, 2002
875
458
T2 is hardly that restrictive. Disable the Secure Boot functionality, once, and you're done. And it wouldn't prevent Win 10 being installed anyway.

It's actually more restrictive than I thought. I installed Catalina to an "external" hard drive being a Samsung 970 Evo Plus mated to a PCIE card. I then wiped clean the internal Apple SSD to serve as my Media drive.

I couldn't go back into the Startup Security Utility under the Recovery procedure when I wanted to change the security settings. Apple Tech Support could not figure out why and only advised me to restore/revive the T2 chip.

The actual solution is to boot back into the Apple SSD and thereby keep a copy of the OS in there just so you can access the Startup Security Utility. The implementation of the T2 chip is too restrictive such that you can't log in that Utility without having an Apple SSD which should not be tied to the T2 chip once you determine you don't need that drive to act as the OS.
 

eflx

macrumors regular
May 14, 2020
184
182
It's not "End of Life". I'm only interested in the ARM offerings for something like a basic web-browsing and document editing machine at this point.

It will be quite a while before Apple has silicone fast enough to replace a top-end Xeon system with 1TB of RAM, and a bit longer than that for all of the much needed x86 apps to convert over to ARM.

I know Apple said a 2 year transition, but this new Mac Pro will last a good 5+ easily with the lifecycle of these machines. Typically speaking, after the 5 year mark a lot of people purchasing a machine as power as this Mac Pro will be ready within a short while for an upgrade. At which point, I figure then it'd be worth it to go for their ARM offering assuming it's solid.

Both Apple and Intel announced continued support for Intel x86 based Mac systems into the future. For both companies to announce continued support, you can be sure that includes their highest-end machines like the Mac Pro.
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It's actually more restrictive than I thought. I installed Catalina to an "external" hard drive being a Samsung 970 Evo Plus mated to a PCIE card. I then wiped clean the internal Apple SSD to serve as my Media drive.

I couldn't go back into the Startup Security Utility under the Recovery procedure when I wanted to change the security settings. Apple Tech Support could not figure out why and only advised me to restore/revive the T2 chip.

The actual solution is to boot back into the Apple SSD and thereby keep a copy of the OS in there just so you can access the Startup Security Utility. The implementation of the T2 chip is too restrictive such that you can't log in that Utility without having an Apple SSD which should not be tied to the T2 chip once you determine you don't need that drive to act as the OS.

I don't understand at all why you'd want to set your system up the way you did there unless you purchased the "256GB SSD" or something to save money? That's just a bit silly IMO and there's no practical reason not to use the internal SSD as a boot/os/app drive at very least and then attach larger 'external' storage as your working drive.
 

adamjackson

macrumors 68020
Jul 9, 2008
2,311
4,676
How long were you planning on keeping it. Realistically? I expected the 2019 MacPro to be 'current' for 3 years from release with annual releases of MPX modules that improve on graphics and IO and computational outputs that are user installable.

I would assume the next MacPro will be ARM and come 2 years from WWDC (or possibly end of 2022) as the last ARM Mac to transition. Apple has said they will support Intel Macs for many years from now which if you look at Apple's Vintage list, it usually comes 6-7 years after release so I think it's appropriate that the 2019 MacPro will be able to run MacOS compiled for X86 until their 2025 release of MacOS in which case they'll inform people that the 2026 or 2027 MacOS will NOT support X85 Macs and be ARM only.

so your 2019 MacPro will be supported with OS releases for 7 years after release and remain usable with security updates for 10 years.

Please quote me in 2025 if I'm wrong but I don't think it'll be EOL at all. For me, I plan on buying another Intel Mac in the next 6-9 months and have no issues with compatibility as by the time X86 support is phased out, it'll be time to upgrade my Mac anyway. (every 3-5 years)
 
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daveedjackson

macrumors 6502
Aug 6, 2009
374
232
London
This whole post is just absurd. The 2013 Mac Pro is still supported, 7 years on. Soooo. It’s highly unlikely this is going anywhere. If they have been developing this for so long, they’re not gonna move too far away, why try to reinvent the wheel with a pro product every 3 years. I think it’s unlike. Hopefully it’ll be a new motherboard with choice of processor. After all Isn’t that the very reason for making it also modular.
 
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jvlfilms

macrumors 6502
Dec 11, 2007
265
225
Staten Island, NY
Most of our Mac Pro's are still kicking perfectly fine and they're around ten years old. I'm not worried whether the current 7,1 will be supported for the years to come because this community has been successful in their efforts thus far to keep these older machines still relevant.

Also, you have to imagine they'd support this machine for a few years after the last one is sold.... and it's their main workstation machines. They'll be supporting Intel for awhile.
 
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