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Inframan

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jan 18, 2013
341
108
Los Angeles, California
Open Discussion:

It doesn't take a genius to figure out that Apple is trying to kill off wires altogether. With the removal of the the Mag Safe Charger for the 2016 MacBook Pro, the removal of the headphone jack on the iPhone 7 its evident that Apple see's a future without wires.

Its been rumored that the next iPhone will introduce "True Wireless Charging". Some may say that Samsung already achieved this many years ago but that is simply not the case. A Charging Pad is not considered to be True Wireless charging because the charger is still connected to a wire. True Wireless Charging will allow you to charge your mobile phone from your pocket or anywhere without wires.

True wireless charging is a type of charger that uses an electromagnetic field to transfer energy between two objects through electromagnetic induction. This is usually done with a charging station. Energy is sent through an inductive coupling to an electrical device, which can then use that energy to charge batteries or run the device. In other words, its Inductive charging. This has yet to be achieved and mass produced successfully for a commercial mobile phone.

With that said in 1999 Steve Jobs and Apple were the first company to introduce a Laptop into the world that could access the internet with something called "Wi-fi" - Apple's iBook G3 was the first Wi-Fi enabled laptop to support a Wifi card. Soon after, many others adopted this tech feature and today it is standard in all mobile devices and laptops.

So, are you ready for a world without wires? A world where you can have one charging station that wirelessly charges all of your devices whether it be from your pocket or your pocketbook. Hopefully it will be here soon!

What are your thoughts?

 
Last edited:

Sanpete

macrumors 68040
Nov 17, 2016
3,695
1,665
Utah
My initial thought is that the wattage needed would require too much magnetic field to be practical in a pocket! Do you have any details?
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,158
True wireless charging without a pad would be awesome for the iPhone. For my own usage with the MacBook Pro it wouldn't benefit me nearly as much, but for highly mobile Users I imagine it would be gamechanging in the way that the LCD has been.

As there are only so many more things that can be added to the iPhone or MacBook Pro (they are pretty complete packages already that do just about everything and do it very well), I think this would be a good step for the next "holy crap that's insane and I need it" innovation.

Would this interfere with devices such as pacemakers, DBS devices, or HDDs?
 

BarracksSi

Suspended
Jul 14, 2015
3,902
2,663
With that said in 2009 Steve Jobs and Apple were the first company to introduce a Laptop into the world that could access the internet with something called "Wi-fi" - Apple's iBook G3 was the first Wi-Fi enabled laptop to support a Wifi card.

More like 1999, not 2009; I had one of the original iBooks and went wireless as soon as the first AirPort base stations appeared on the market. It was so great to use, I wondered why it took so long for everyone else to get on board.

But anyway...

What does the wireless charger plug into? Is it small enough to transport in my laptop bag? Would it be just a bigger version of what I use to charge my Watch?
 

Nilhum

macrumors regular
Dec 20, 2016
210
309
That video reeks of BS. Sending electromagnetic waves worth 85 watts would just end up frying a person, this does not include the fact that energy and distance have a inverse releationsip when it comes to inductive charging. The pad chargers are already inefficent and take too much energy.

Unless lasers are beamed to charge a laptop, how would charging laptops wirelessly from a distance, heck even a phone, be possible?
 
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