2Ghz Powerbook

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by Dronecatcher, Jun 13, 2016.

  1. rabidz7, Jun 19, 2016
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2016

    rabidz7 macrumors 65816

    rabidz7

    Joined:
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    #51
    I have run my early 05 17in at 2.08 or 2.17. Was unstable.

    I have a DLSD. It has a usual PPC7447 but totally different motherboard config. It has resistor settings for 200MHz bus speed on front of the board according to the schematics. Your Screens shot shows the busses at 133mhz. I wonder if this is an error. I see the PLL config resistors near the CPU. Will check the schematic to see what multiplier it corresponds to. If the resistors are at the stock 10x bus speedconfig, the bus has been raised.

    edit: bus is clocked.
    Two pins set to 0 in PLL config. Through process of elimination, that leaves 10x multiplier. 10 x 200 is 2ghz.

    Multiplier
    All multiplier settings appear to be 10K-Ohm

    ..................0...........1
    PLL0 -> R3721+R3720

    PLL1 -> R3723+R3722

    PLL2 -> R3725+R3724

    PLL3 -> R3727+R3726

    PLL4 -> R3729+R3728

    PLL5 -> R3731+R3730

    NOTE: PLL5 is only for diagnostic use. Do not set it to anything other than 0. The PowerBook will not function properly with PLL5 set to 1.



    Bus
    All bus settings appear to be 10K-Ohm

    ....................0...........1
    BOM0 -> R2305+R2304

    BOM1 -> R2307+R2306

    BOM2 -> R2309+R2308

    BOM3 -> R2311+R2310

    When the resistor on the 0 side of a BOM jumped, the BOM is set to 0. When the resistor on the 1 side of a BOM jumped, the BOM is set to 1. If both the 0 side and 1 side is jumped the PowerBook will not function properly.

    Voltage
    All voltage pins are 470K-Ohm.

    ...............0..........1
    D0 -> R3988+R3989

    D1 -> R3986+R3987

    D2 -> R3984+R3985

    D3 -> R3982+R3983

    D4 -> R3980+R3981

    When only the resistor on the left of the chart is jumped, the pin is set to 0. When the only resistor on the right side of the chart is jumped, the pin is set to 1. Example: D4 is set to 0 if only R3980 is jumped. D4 is set to 1 if only R398 is jumped.
     
  2. Hack5190 macrumors 6502a

    Hack5190

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    #52
    Site down or just really busy? Can't access it using TFF or Safari from my PowerBook G4 :(
     
  3. Dronecatcher thread starter macrumors 68020

    Dronecatcher

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    #53
    Agreed, the briefly posted photo looks fake - especially with the counterfeiter's friend, out of range auto-focus, covering up any poor Photoshop skills.
    However, the comparison photos of 7448 are 2008 chips - according to online info, the first 7448s rolled off production lines October 2005.

    From my first posting of this guy's video, I'd assumed his Powerbook had the Daystar upgrade and the L2 wasn't identifying correctly.

    I find it sad that someone feels the need to go to such elaborate lengths to fool a niche collection of enthusiasts.
     
  4. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #54
    I will add the technical docs on the 7448 that give the die size-note that it's my measured and reported value, not the obviously larger 7447A die

    http://www.datasheetlib.com/datasheet/823598/mpc7448_motorola-semiconductor.html?page=9#datasheet

    This document is dated 2006.
     
  5. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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  6. Dronecatcher thread starter macrumors 68020

    Dronecatcher

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    #56
    Upon further reading, that power management info for the 17" DLSD is also contained in the developer info for the 1Ghz 17" model - in fact, the only reference thus far of a more intelligent power management as found on DLSD models is in the 7448 spec sheets.
    It must be case that the 7447B implemented an undocumented version of the later power management found in the 7448 but Apple strangely chose to restrict it to DLSDs instead of allowing other 7447B Macs to use that feature.
     
  7. rabidz7 macrumors 65816

    rabidz7

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    #57
    ∫een down fo long time.
     
  8. Xandros macrumors regular

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    Sep 19, 2010
    #58
    It's not really that strange if you think about it. Those PowerBook's were the last ever G4's Apple released, in October 2005. Apple had already announced they planned to switch to x86 architecture at the June '05 WWDC, so it's likely any R&D on new G4 and G5 models completely ceased after that if not before.

    The improved power management might have resulted due to them planning to implement 7448 processors but because of the cessation of development they probably instead just decided to use up stock of the 7447's instead of carry on with the plan to bring in the new version of the CPU and as such other Mac G4's never saw the benefit from it.

    Of course that's all purely speculation on my part but it seems pretty logical if you ask me.
     
  9. Dronecatcher thread starter macrumors 68020

    Dronecatcher

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    #59
    I agree but the iBooks released in July 2005, which according to Open Firmware derived information, have the same CPU, had standard power management.
    If we were to deduce Apple ceased PPC development after the June announcement, where did the DLSD CPUs advanced power management come from?
    I'm not digging for some cloak and dagger mystery at Apple, I'd just like to know the how and why of that unique power management on the DLSD, that as we know, promptly disappeared with the G5.
     
  10. Xandros macrumors regular

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    Sep 19, 2010
    #60
    Simple answer to that is, the iBook dev team finalised their design before the PowerBook team, which stands to reason given it came out around three months before the PowerBook did. I'd wager that the enhancements to the power management came about after the final iBook model was already finished and Apple probably brought down the hammer before the PowerBook had been finalised, so it got the new power management, but not the 7448. As for the G5's, well they were a whole different kettle of fish to the G4 in terms of power and thermals so they probably needed something else entirely to sort that out. They did after all alter the PMU in 2004 for th G5 Macs to take on a bigger role and renamed it the SMU (and that went on to become the SMC in intel Macs), maybe that had something to do with the feature not being in G5's of the time as it wasn't needed.

    Anyway like I say pure speculation on my part, but I really don't think at this late stage you'll ever find out exactly why unless you can locate an Apple engineer responsible for the design and poke him with a stick until he tells you. Probably best to just accept it as it is; consigned to the history books as one of those decisions Apple made that doesn't make any bloody sense.
     
  11. Dronecatcher thread starter macrumors 68020

    Dronecatcher

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    #61
    Maybe I'm reading in too much to the "advanced power management" angle - after all, in effect it could be simply be the Processor Performance option had been removed and the Powerbook is always set to Automatic?
    Regardless, it's been fun learning more about the G4 than I previously knew and given it's performance capability against a G5 at the same speed, it seems obvious the G5 never got anywhere near it's true potential.
     
  12. Hack5190 macrumors 6502a

    Hack5190

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    #62
    As I suspected :D

    Thanks for removing it from your signature.
     
  13. California macrumors 68040

    California

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    Aug 21, 2004
    #63
    The price for Daystar to upgrade was prohibitive. I had the 1.5ghz 12" PB and Daystar wanted 660 bucks or so to upgrade the 12" to 1.67ghz. It was a little bit more to upgrade the 15" and 17" to 2.0 or 2.1ghz as I recall.

    There was a daystar disc that had some software that optimized performance... look around for it Bunnspecial... I think you have it.
     
  14. Hack5190 macrumors 6502a

    Hack5190

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    #64
    I think almost every PowerPC user would like to try that software, but if you need a beta tester :cool:
     
  15. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #65
    Thanks-now I have to go hunting!

    Assuming I find it, I'll image and put it on the Garden
     
  16. mrchinchilla macrumors 6502

    mrchinchilla

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  17. California macrumors 68040

    California

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    #67
    No it had a name ... something Gary at Daystar created to optimize performance on PPCs... Bunnspecial has the disc
    I didn't see it there. It had a name from Gary at Daystar. He was/is a great guy btw.
     
  18. Hack5190 macrumors 6502a

    Hack5190

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    #68
    Please let us know if you post it. Thanks!
     
  19. rabidz7 macrumors 65816

    rabidz7

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    #69
    what happened to Daystar technologies? went under?
     
  20. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

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    #70
    I found an "Xlr8 MACHspeed Control Disk"-is that it?
     
  21. Xandros macrumors regular

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    Sep 19, 2010
    #71
    Judging from what I'd seen of their website on web archive I was going to say they quietly shut up shop before 2012, then I came across a linkedin profile for Gary Dailey (presumably the same Gary people have mentioned in this thread earlier), and his profile states he was the CEO of Daystar until 2011. I suppose you could ask him if you want to know what happened.

    Looks like the only remnants of Daystar exist as part of the spin off company XLR8 which still exists and Gary is a manager of, but these days they just make capture cards for Macs rather than the those MAChspeed upgrades Daystar used to sell.
     
  22. California macrumors 68040

    California

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    Aug 21, 2004
    #72
    Yes. put it in a PPC and watch what it does... I was never sure but I believe it was to optimize CPU
    --- Post Merged, Jun 26, 2016 ---
    Gary of Daystar made the third party macs in the mid to late 90's, beige box, can't remember what they were called... I was bowled over when someone I knew owned one, had no idea it was a Mac in another box.

    He is a very smart Mac guy. Apple made it hard for places like Daystar, I think.
     
  23. AphoticD macrumors 68000

    AphoticD

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    Feb 17, 2017
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    Australia
    #73
    I know this is over a year old but I just wanted to say great detective work @bunnspecial. This was an entertaining read!

    Another indicator of the OP photo being fake is if you look closely, you can spot where Photoshop's clone tool has smoothed out the areas to the right of the so called "8". The film noise is not even in both of these areas and you can see a vertical repetition of the noise pattern on the upper label.

    What a scammer! I wonder what else he has 'shopped for bragging rights. "A Saggy Noodle" perhaps?
     
  24. Daniël Oosterhuis macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2016
    #74
    The worst thing is that this scam, and internal papers that note the Apple engineers originally wanted to use 7448s, managed to convince EveryMac.com that some of the DLSD/HRs actually do have 7448s, which they put a note about on the DLSD in question's page underneath the CPU section. Thankfully, they have edited it, but now claim people discuss the processors in the DLSD/HR to be "bordering on the irrational" and still say "Perhaps there are more than one processor types used.", which is still false because Apple did not use the 7448 in any Mac, only CPU upgrade manufacturers/services did. That said, EveryMac can be spotty when it comes to CPU type anyways. Many of us noticed some other lists to have wrong CPU types, and they don't seem to really welcome corrections when it comes to that, so their notes on that specific specification on PowerPC Macs should be taken with a grain of salt.
     
  25. AphoticD macrumors 68000

    AphoticD

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    #75
    Yes, I was clearly misled by the listing on everymac, which is why I brought it up on the other thread!
     

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