2K and 4K

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by xparaparafreakx, Apr 28, 2007.

  1. xparaparafreakx macrumors 65816

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    #1
    When will TVs with 2K and 4K come out? Should people wait for these TVs?
     
  2. bkvideography macrumors member

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    Apr 18, 2007
    #2
    just because some guy with oakley decides to jump WAY ahead of the curve and introduce a new format does not mean the industry will adopt it. sure, it's an amazing format, but who do you know that even has a 1080p HD DVD player? half the people I know don't even know that you need to have a hd dvd player to watch your movies in high def. 2K and 4K will not be industry standard for 10 or 20 years i don't think.
     
  3. P-Worm macrumors 68020

    P-Worm

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    #3
    To even take advantage of 2K or 4K video files, you would need one MASSIVE TV screen. The 60" models out today wouldn't be able to make use of such high resolution because the screen area is too small.

    P-Worm
     
  4. Mydriasis macrumors 6502

    Mydriasis

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    #4
    Well 2K is not much bigger than 1080. But the 4K with its 4520 x 2540 px is huge. Hey, thats is equivalent to a 12mp photocamera. Crazy!:eek:
     
  5. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #5
    2k and 4k are for digital cinema.. so when you go the movies in a few years they'll have a digital 4k projector.

    The next step in televisions is 2540p, but that wont be for at least 5-10 years.
     
  6. Fearless Leader macrumors 68020

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    #6
    no HD is the norm today. yes its becoming more prevalent but still massive amounts of the content is in SD.
     
  7. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #7
    Next 5-10 years? It's probably going to take 5 years just for HD to completely displace SD.

    In home 4k isn't going to happen anytime soon because we are still transitioning over to HD (and will be for a while). There's no way content producers, content distributors and consumers are going to spend billions of dollars again moving to a new standard anytime soon. Also, like others have stated it's complete overkill unless you have a gigantic (like full sized screen) in-home theater.


    Lethal
     
  8. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #8
    Yes, but you might start to see a few higher definition tvs by then. It definitely won't be widespread though.
     
  9. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #9
    But what are you going to view on those higher def TVs? The ATSC HD standard tops out at 1920x1080. And where are you going to watch it? You'll need a huge screen to be able to possibly discern the added resolution as well as a huge room so you can sit back far enough that you can keep the whole screen inside your field of view.


    Lethal
     
  10. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #10
    Yeah, I agree with you. But electronics companies are always trying to improve their technologies and love showing off new stuff. So we might see some prototypes or something within 10 years of a new panel. Who knows. You can't really predict where technology is going.
     
  11. Mydriasis macrumors 6502

    Mydriasis

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    #11
    I can't predict were technology is going either, nor would I consider myself knowledgeable on the topic, but I could totally see screens becoming available with resolution at around 4k much earlier than 10 years.

    Apple is doing their best to get a resolution independent UI, because they want more than 100ppi. The iPhone has 160ppi. And a 30in display with 160ppi is already pretty close to 4k.

    I personally don't TVs as we know them will get much bigger than the big ones we have now. Most of us don't have the space.
     
  12. P-Worm macrumors 68020

    P-Worm

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    #12
    If I were to guess where the television technology is going, I would guess that televisions are going to be able to produce an HDR image. There are already some prototypes that do this, but they are really expensive. The thing with higher resolution is that it means nothing if you can't discern the difference. It's like watching 1080p on an iPod screen, The difference between 480p and 1080p would be nothing.

    P-Worm
     
  13. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #13
    Showing off a prototype or concept piece at a trade show is a far cry from it ending up in everyone's living room (which is what the OP was asking about). HDTV has been shown off at trade shows since the 80's yet 20+ years later it's just starting to actually gain traction. Even when the technology exists to get 4k screens into the hands of consumers (AFAIK only Sony has a handful of 4k projectors and they aren't for sale) you still have to have the infrastructure to support it (content producers using 4k, content distributors using 4k, etc.,). Right now the infrastructure is in the middle of a painfully slow move from SD to HD (which maxes out at 1920x1080) so I can't see us moving to anything beyond HD any time soon because that will require another painfully slow (and very expensive) move to another standard.


    Lethal
     
  14. Silentwave macrumors 68000

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    May 26, 2006
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    Gainesville, FL
    #14
    I'm all ready to jump on the 4K bandwagon with the RED, but I don't see it being commonplace in people's homes as far as TV goes anytime soon... and I'm OK with that.

    On computers maybe. And certainly digital cinema- I am not impresed by recent moves to shoot feature films with existing digital cine cameras, which are all shooting more or less 1080P, while film scans continue to extract usable detail at 4K.

    Some of these films may not stand the test of time if and when we transition to a more detailed format... which is why I'm planning on shooting 4K even without a massive infrastructure.

    It's easier to convert a BD-ROM or HD-DVD at 1080P from a 4K master than it is to create a superior quality 4K release from a 1080P master :p

    In the meantime, if I have anything that requires it, then the detail is there for future use :)
     

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