2K vs 4K 27" Monitors?

choreo

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 10, 2008
246
98
Midland, TX
I am primaility a photo retoucher and I am looking to add a 27" display. It seems like most retouchers use NEC or EIZO because of their abilitty to display nearly all of the AdobeRGB color gamut and have their own calibration solutions. Most of the 4k monitors can only reproduce maybe 75% of AdobeRGB?

I see lots of 4K display options, but most seem to be either less than $1,000 or over $5,000 (EIZO, etc.)

I currently have two 27" NEC monitors that come with Spectraview calibration software.

My question is, NEC does not currently offer a 4k high-end monitor (I called their Tech Support line to confirm) and most of the EIZO 2k monitors are between $1200-$2500

Examples:
NEC PA271Q-BK - 2k at about $1,300
Eizo ColorEdge CG277 - 2k at about $2,500

So my question is, why are most of the high-end monitors sticking with 2K? I am not sure what I would gain with a 4K monitor in say Photoshop when zoomed in to 100% for retouching?
 

mattspace

macrumors 65816
Jun 5, 2013
1,221
942
Australia
Examples:
NEC PA271Q-BK - 2k at about $1,300
Eizo ColorEdge CG277 - 2k at about $2,500
Because I've been doing a bit of research on Benq monitors lately, having bought a pair of their new SW240 24" 1200p monitors...

Definitely have a look into the SW271; 4k, 27", true 10 bit panel, hardware calibration with 14bit LUT.

The slightly older PV270 is a 2k screen, but is uniformity corrected. Benq have demonstrated the pre-production version of the 4k update to this display, so hopefully it'll be out soon.
[doublepost=1543458219][/doublepost]
So my question is, why are most of the high-end monitors sticking with 2K? I am not sure what I would gain with a 4K monitor in say Photoshop when zoomed in to 100% for retouching?
Quality over quantity - big panels are more difficult to get consistent uniformity, so the price is radically higher, and unless you're doing print production, hi-dpi might not have a very large effect on your process, whereas colour accuracy can be make or break.
 

choreo

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 10, 2008
246
98
Midland, TX
Because I've been doing a bit of research on Benq monitors lately, having bought a pair of their new SW240 24" 1200p monitors...

Definitely have a look into the SW271; 4k, 27", true 10 bit panel, hardware calibration with 14bit LUT.

The slightly older PV270 is a 2k screen, but is uniformity corrected. Benq have demonstrated the pre-production version of the 4k update to this display, so hopefully it'll be out soon.
[doublepost=1543458219][/doublepost]

Quality over quantity - big panels are more difficult to get consistent uniformity, so the price is radically higher, and unless you're doing print production, hi-dpi might not have a very large effect on your process, whereas colour accuracy can be make or break.
Thanks for the tip. Looks like a viable option; however, I see some people have returned the SW271 to B&H due to an inconsistent green-cast or dead pixels - apparently luck of the draw?
 

mattspace

macrumors 65816
Jun 5, 2013
1,221
942
Australia
Thanks for the tip. Looks like a viable option; however, I see some people have returned the SW271 to B&H due to an inconsistent green-cast or dead pixels - apparently luck of the draw?
no idea, my SW240s are great, but I imagine there's sample variation (and I'd question if they've calibrated them) with everything. Here in .au NEC has apparently changed their pixel warranties to allow a much higher number of hot and dead pixels, so the distributor / service provider who carries EIZO, NEC and Benq is recommending against them.

I was set to pull the trigger on the SW271 myself, but I'm waiting to see what happens with the upcoming PV271.
 

ixxx69

macrumors 65816
Jul 31, 2009
1,119
634
United States
I am primaility a photo retoucher and I am looking to add a 27" display. It seems like most retouchers use NEC or EIZO because of their abilitty to display nearly all of the AdobeRGB color gamut and have their own calibration solutions. Most of the 4k monitors can only reproduce maybe 75% of AdobeRGB?

I see lots of 4K display options, but most seem to be either less than $1,000 or over $5,000 (EIZO, etc.)

I currently have two 27" NEC monitors that come with Spectraview calibration software.

My question is, NEC does not currently offer a 4k high-end monitor (I called their Tech Support line to confirm) and most of the EIZO 2k monitors are between $1200-$2500

Examples:
NEC PA271Q-BK - 2k at about $1,300
Eizo ColorEdge CG277 - 2k at about $2,500

So my question is, why are most of the high-end monitors sticking with 2K? I am not sure what I would gain with a 4K monitor in say Photoshop when zoomed in to 100% for retouching?
Is Dell an option? Their UP2718Q (~US$1,500) is a 4K pro display for just that kind of work.

(not to be confused with the much less expensive U2718Q which is "good enough" for a lot of pros).

4K is great for photo work. You don't know what you're missing! :cool:
 
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