3D Rendering on MacBook Pro with Retina display

Shahidkapoor

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 16, 2011
86
0
London
Hello,
I've got a RMBP and use it for Architecture and interior design. I'm interested in buying a good 3D rendering software from the Mac app store.

Why I want particularly from mac app store is because the updates are free and usually when you buy from a website and when a new version comes up, they charge you for it.

So, do you know any good 3D rendering software on mac app store / any other rendering software in which updates or new versions are free to update.

I've put this in this MBP section coz this is much active than the other design section.

Any help would be much appreciated.
 

stevelam

macrumors 65816
Nov 4, 2010
1,215
3
Hello,


Why I want particularly from mac app store is because the updates are free and usually when you buy from a website and when a new version comes up, they charge you for it.
just to clarify, this is not always the case. updates are not always free and theres no guarantee that apps in the app store will remain there. in fact, a lot of companies have abandoned the app store because its too limiting.
 

Shahidkapoor

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 16, 2011
86
0
London
Any reason you aren't going with the freeware Blender?
Thank you, I'll try that.

I model my room in Sketchup/ Live interior 3D and they are in .dae format. Do you think Blender will open that format? Or do you know what formats are generally compatible with blender?
 

Shahidkapoor

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 16, 2011
86
0
London
just to clarify, this is not always the case. updates are not always free and theres no guarantee that apps in the app store will remain there. in fact, a lot of companies have abandoned the app store because its too limiting.
true. I agree. But I don't know why I feel safe/ good when I buy an app from app store rather than buying from a website. lol I just prefer the app store.

I really wish Apple made an app for 3D designers as they have made Aperture for Photographers and Logic studio for Musicians. And even the Graphic designers are covered with Pixelmator though not by apple, but still it's good for the price.
 

geoffreak

macrumors 68020
Feb 8, 2008
2,193
2
Thank you, I'll try that.

I model my room in Sketchup/ Live interior 3D and they are in .dae format. Do you think Blender will open that format? Or do you know what formats are generally compatible with blender?
I don't know all that much about blender, but I know something that does: Clicky ;)
 

mlfarrell

macrumors member
Mar 17, 2011
45
1
You may want to check out my Verto Studio app. It should be retina ready and I plan on putting out even more support after my rmbp arrives next week.

I will warn that the DAE support is currently not 100% however, waiting for ML to become more standard so I can rely on scene kit which has a flawless DAE importer.
 

where is it

macrumors 6502
Jun 19, 2012
423
281
England
Cheetah 3d is pretty good for 3d on the app store. Also check out Strata 3D on the app store. Its a bit old school nowadays but considering your looking at architecture a pretty good purchase....
 

ecnal

macrumors newbie
Jun 13, 2012
12
0
If you are going to be pursuing this professionally (ie: more then just the occaisionally paying hobby)- then I don't think you should be looking to the appstore for pro level 3d programs.
There will invariably be a large learning curve with most 3d programs (sketchup being the exception, but even then to get the most out of it takes time), so investing in a program that is industry recognized and will skill you up for the future is a plus.

Generally speaking, the good 3d packages are very expensive.

Cinema 4d started as a native mac 3d package, and remains the best option for pro level work imho. At about 3k, it is expensive. The render engine in cinema 4d is ok, but for architectural rendering you would be looking at getting Vray as a plugin.

Vray is by far the most common rendering engine for architectural work. There is a vray plugin for sketchup on windows, but not yet on mac. Vray also is available for 3dstudio max (similar in functionality to cinema 4d, but on windows).

Another option that is to use Rhino osx beta (currently free, will remain in beta for another year at least) for your modelling requirements. Rhino is an extremely competent architectural modeller, and on windows it has a vray plugin (will probably have to wait for the full release of rhino osx before vray put a product out). The renders available in rhino are very basic without plugins at the moment, so it is more of a modelling program until plugin render engines become available.
 

Neeeol

macrumors newbie
May 7, 2013
3
0
Try freecad. There's an osx build (for lion) and it's free...
I have downloaded FreeCAD and BRL-CAD, but neither will start. There is no error message, the software just refuses to launch. My guess is that I am missing some library, but I cannot find any support or any lists of prerequisites.

Can anyone guide me in getting these to run? I am using OS X 10.8.5 with all the latest updates.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:

AirThis

macrumors 6502a
Mar 6, 2012
505
0
I have downloaded FreeCAD and BRL-CAD, but neither will start. There is no error message, the software just refuses to launch. My guess is that I am missing some library, but I cannot find any support or any lists of prerequisites.

Can anyone guide me in getting these to run? I am using OS X 10.8.5 with all the latest updates.

Thanks in advance.
Try the dmg in this thread:

http://forum.freecadweb.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=4811#wrap
 

leftyMac

macrumors regular
Feb 20, 2011
117
6
If you are going to be pursuing this professionally (ie: more then just the occaisionally paying hobby)- then I don't think you should be looking to the appstore for pro level 3d programs.
There will invariably be a large learning curve with most 3d programs (sketchup being the exception, but even then to get the most out of it takes time), so investing in a program that is industry recognized and will skill you up for the future is a plus.

Generally speaking, the good 3d packages are very expensive.

Cinema 4d started as a native mac 3d package, and remains the best option for pro level work imho. At about 3k, it is expensive. The render engine in cinema 4d is ok, but for architectural rendering you would be looking at getting Vray as a plugin.

Vray is by far the most common rendering engine for architectural work. There is a vray plugin for sketchup on windows, but not yet on mac. Vray also is available for 3dstudio max (similar in functionality to cinema 4d, but on windows).

Another option that is to use Rhino osx beta (currently free, will remain in beta for another year at least) for your modelling requirements. Rhino is an extremely competent architectural modeller, and on windows it has a vray plugin (will probably have to wait for the full release of rhino osx before vray put a product out). The renders available in rhino are very basic without plugins at the moment, so it is more of a modelling program until plugin render engines become available.
I totally agree with this statement. I used to do a lot of 3D using 3D Max on PC, and recently I started relearning 3D in cinema 4D (just download a trial version and see if you like it). With a very little learning curve, I am already almost up to where I was in 3D Max. Cinema 4D feels very complete, very intuitive, there are tons of tutorials on YouTube for it.
 

akdj

macrumors 65816
Mar 10, 2008
1,162
58
Alaska
If you are going to be pursuing this professionally (ie: more then just the occaisionally paying hobby)- then I don't think you should be looking to the appstore for pro level 3d programs.
There will invariably be a large learning curve with most 3d programs (sketchup being the exception, but even then to get the most out of it takes time), so investing in a program that is industry recognized and will skill you up for the future is a plus.

Generally speaking, the good 3d packages are very expensive.

Cinema 4d started as a native mac 3d package, and remains the best option for pro level work imho. At about 3k, it is expensive. The render engine in cinema 4d is ok, but for architectural rendering you would be looking at getting Vray as a plugin.

Vray is by far the most common rendering engine for architectural work. There is a vray plugin for sketchup on windows, but not yet on mac. Vray also is available for 3dstudio max (similar in functionality to cinema 4d, but on windows).

Another option that is to use Rhino osx beta (currently free, will remain in beta for another year at least) for your modelling requirements. Rhino is an extremely competent architectural modeller, and on windows it has a vray plugin (will probably have to wait for the full release of rhino osx before vray put a product out). The renders available in rhino are very basic without plugins at the moment, so it is more of a modelling program until plugin render engines become available.
Thanks ecnal,

I appreciate the insight...but have a question or two. Apologies to the OP, but I think relative to the conversation. I'm an occasional Cinema4d user in our studio but sound and AE are my usual chairs. I wasn't aware there was a plug in (VRay) active for the rendering. (I'm never a 'finalizer'---more of an 'add file to' user, over the shoulder ;)). We've got C4D on a pair of a half dozen Mac Pros in the studio. They're both 12 core, 32GB RAM rigs...and our designers are studs. Is there a need....regardless of Mac...to plug in VRay? Or is this for rMBPs only? Reading back through you are pretty specific to architectural rendering but is it suggested for 'speed' or performance increase in rendering 'other' models? As well, is Autodesk not 'quite' there yet for Mac? AutoCAD? Maya? Just curious as I'm in your camp.

To the OP...This is sage advice. If you plan to 'make a living' doing 3d modeling, find one, download the trial. Spend $25 and 20-30 hours @ lynda.com learning 'your choice'. If at the end of the trial you're not satisfied, intrigued or overwhelmed, you'll know. $3-4k can be expected to do it right...and with file interactivity/compatibility amongst associates. Then, depending what your time is worth...you'll put a hundred hours in to really learn the software (depending on your experience now...that could vary considerably)----& a lifetime to 'master' it:)

Good Luck!

J