3GB in new MBP

Garden Knowm

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 10, 2006
307
0
California
Questions..

What signifigance will 1 extra GB make? Are there any test numbers available?

Why pay $575? Isn't it possible to get it cheaper?

and finally

When it ships with 2GB of ram.. is it 2 - 1GB cards.. thus leaving a vacant spot for an additional 1GB... ?

I have 6GB in my G5 dual 2.5 Powermac and it gets bogged down when I have Motion 2 and FCP open at the same time.
 

ghall

macrumors 68040
Jun 27, 2006
3,771
1
Rhode Island
Could it be possible to upgrade the previous version of the MacBook Pro to 3 GB using a 2 GB chip? Actually, what whould stop somebody from loading up 4GB using 2x2GB chips?
 

Willis

macrumors 68020
Apr 23, 2006
2,259
4
Beds, UK
ghall said:
Could it be possible to upgrade the previous version of the MacBook Pro to 3 GB using a 2 GB chip? Actually, what whould stop somebody from loading up 4GB using 2x2GB chips?
why dont you try it and let us know :rolleyes:
 

NATO

macrumors 68000
Feb 14, 2005
1,691
28
Northern Ireland
ghall said:
Could it be possible to upgrade the previous version of the MacBook Pro to 3 GB using a 2 GB chip? Actually, what whould stop somebody from loading up 4GB using 2x2GB chips?
I'd be quite interested to find out about this also, I don't see why its not technically possible as there doesn't seem to be a major change to the internals of the new MBP
 

Malus

macrumors 6502
Jul 19, 2005
299
0
Garden Knowm said:
When it ships with 2GB of ram.. is it 2 - 1GB cards.. thus leaving a vacant spot for an additional 1GB... ?

I think the logic board is designed to only handle so much ram...or at least thats what i've been told :confused:
 

MajereXYU

macrumors regular
May 11, 2005
125
0
It may be possible to put 4GB of RAM in the new MBP.

However, Apple technical specifications state a maximum of 3GB RAM.

It is for a reason.

The memory controller may be designed to address a maximum of 3GB thus the restriction. The actuall SO-DIMM would accept the second 2GB RAM module but the memory controller would not register and manage it.

That's my conjecture at least.

And as for the original poster's question as to why the huge price premium on the 3GB option, if you look at RAM module prices, you will notice that the price difference between a 1GB SO-DIMM and a 2GB SO-DIMM (SO-DIMM being notebook memory, which is usually more expensive than its desktop counterpart) is huge.

2GB DDR2-667 modules just recently started being available and carry the usual "bleeding edge" price premium.

People have to realise Apple doesn't manufacture computers.

The are a system assembler.

They outsource computer components (CPU, Videocard, Hard Drive, Optical Drive, RAM, LCD panel etc...) and put them together. They design the enclosures and have them manufactured to their standards by other companies that are specialized in this field (ex: AsusTEK and Quanta make enclosures for MB and MBP).

So if RAM prices are high, Apple charges more. In all cases, buying RAM from Apple is more expensive.

It would cost you less to get the 1GB shipping in ther MBP and add a 2GB module bought from elsewhere. But you would have to research the proper RAM, get it shipped to you and install it yourself and then making sure it works properly.
To some people, that is too much of a hassle and risk, so they are happy to pay Apple a premium for them to get certified, tested and warrantied RAM.

I hope that makes sense.
 

nevir

macrumors regular
Aug 27, 2006
111
0
extraextra said:
Isn't a 2GB stick really expensive? I thought it was like close to $600?
Try double that.

Amazingly, it's quite a bit cheaper to go the Apple route than Crucial for once. Though the 1GB sticks are roughly half the price of the Apple-branded RAM.
 
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