4 Year old dies after riding Epcot Ride


emw

macrumors G4
Aug 2, 2004
11,177
0
powermac666 said:
I'm sure there will be a lot of you jumping all over the mother for taking her boy on that ride, and also at the employee who let him go on it despite being too small. Set that aside for a moment, and imagine what pain the family is going through.
From what I read in the article, the boy met the size requirements, so I can't blame the employee.

And the mother? Why would she assume that a ride at Disney Land would be fatal to her son? How many times have we trusted that when we put our child on a ride (at a carnival, fair, etc.) that the people running the thing have been responsible in regards to maintaining the equipment?

powermac666 said:
I had to call my 4 year old son at home to hear his voice after I read this article. So sad.
No doubt. :(
 

zelmo

macrumors 603
Jul 3, 2004
5,490
1
Mac since 7.5
emw said:
From what I read in the article, the boy met the size requirements, so I can't blame the employee.

And the mother? Why would she assume that a ride at Disney Land would be fatal to her son? How many times have we trusted that when we put our child on a ride (at a carnival, fair, etc.) that the people running the thing have been responsible in regards to maintaining the equipment?

No doubt. :(
Ah, I mis-read the article. I thought police said the boy did not meet the minimum 44-inch height requirement. :eek: Guess I was feeling a little emotional, since I have a 4-yr old little guy myself.

My wife and I discussed taking Nathan to DW when he is a bit older, at least 6. I know lots of folks who take their kids at 2 or 3 years old. Sure, it's cool to see that look of wonder on his face, but I'd rather he be old enough to remember the trip.
 

Applespider

macrumors G4
This is just terribly sad. I wonder if the autopsy will show a previously undiagnosed heart problem that might explain it.

I feel desperately sorry for the mother. He's the appropriate height, he's fit and healthy, he thinks space is cool so why not? He's there with his mother and sister to share the carriage and cushion him. His sister probably wants to go on as many rides as possible but can't because her bro is too small for some of them. Why wouldn't she take him on this one he meets the requirements for?
 

topgunn

macrumors 65816
Nov 5, 2004
1,454
1,236
Houston
powermac666 said:
My wife and I discussed taking Nathan to DW when he is a bit older, at least 6. I know lots of folks who take their kids at 2 or 3 years old. Sure, it's cool to see that look of wonder on his face, but I'd rather he be old enough to remember the trip.
Funny you mention that. I tried to convince my wife to wait until the kids are older before we take them to Disney World so that they will be able to remember it. But alas, we are leaving for Disney World in less than a week with our 1 and 3 year olds as well as the rest of the extended family.
 

zelmo

macrumors 603
Jul 3, 2004
5,490
1
Mac since 7.5
topgunn said:
Funny you mention that. I tried to convince my wife to wait until the kids are older before we take them to Disney World so that they will be able to remember it. But alas, we are leaving for Disney World in less than a week with our 1 and 3 year olds as well as the rest of the extended family.
Well, you know they will still have a magical experience. DW is a biggie, so we decided to wait. We have taken Nathan (a big Elmo fan) to Sesame Street Place in Philly, and will probably do another quasi-local park like Six Flags, Busch Gardens or King's Dominion next year.
 

Mr. Anderson

Moderator emeritus
Nov 1, 2001
22,407
0
VA
that is very sad and very odd. Especially for someone so young to be affected by the ride like that. I'm wondering if he might not have had an unknown/undiagnosed heart problem. If that was the case, it was just a matter of time before something happened - truly awful.

I can't even imagine what I'd do if that happened to my son.....

D
 

eRondeau

macrumors 65816
Mar 3, 2004
1,020
96
Canada's South Coast
Physics...

I'm no expert on the physics of thrill rides however I remember reading that one of the reasons for height restrictions is due to the physics of the forces exerted by these rides on the body. Several people suffered neck injuries on a rollercoaster at an amusement park (Ohio?) a few years ago and it was determined that they were all exactly the same height. The rotating action of the rollercoaster looping around the radius of the track concentrated the centrifigual forces at a certain point above the seat of the rollercoaster car. Unfortunately for those who were injured, that point was a weak area in their neck.
 

Dalriada

macrumors 6502
Aug 26, 2004
279
0
Moorlough Shore
powermac666 said:
I'd rather he be old enough to remember the trip.
Memories are one thing but I just think that a child should be old enough to decide for HIMSELF if he wants to go on such a rough ride or not. My kids were certainly given the option (and explanation) before going ahead. This said my thoughts go out to the parents for such a tragic event.
 

notjustjay

macrumors 603
Sep 19, 2003
6,040
111
Canada, eh?
Dalriada said:
Memories are one thing but I just think that a child should be old enough to decide for HIMSELF if he wants to go on such a rough ride or not. My kids were certainly given the option (and explanation) before going ahead. This said my thoughts go out to the parents for such a tragic event.
Agreed. When I was little my dad took me to an amusement park and took me on a ride which I wasn't really that enthusiastic about, but he managed to convince me to get on with him. It was one of those pirate ship rides that swings back and forth in an ever-increasing arc until it eventually does a 360. That thing traumatized me, I remember clinging for dear life with my eyes firmly clenched shut waiting for the thing to stop so I could get off. I still can't look at one of those things today without shuddering.
 

aloofman

macrumors 68020
Dec 17, 2002
2,206
0
Socal
I recall that a few years ago there was a case in California where an otherwise healthy woman had a brain aneurysm on a roller coaster. The family threatened to sue, but I don't think that really went anywhere. The conditions for a brain aneurysm are generally either not detectable or not treatable, and it could have happened anytime in the woman's life, with or without physical or emotional stress. It was just one of those things, I guess.
 

bousozoku

Moderator emeritus
Jun 25, 2002
13,951
3
Gone but not forgotten.
Since I'm in the area, I saw the noon news and they talked about it a bit. They've had a few people go to hospital after riding the ride. It's a shame. Probably a hidden problem that will be shown by the autopsy.

I found the ride rather light compared to what I would imagine is the real thing but I can imagine if you're trying to work against the forces instead of just going with it, you could somehow hurt yourself.
 

StarbucksSam

macrumors 65816
Nov 21, 2004
1,414
0
Washington, D.C.
I feel so sorry for the parents of the child. He did not, however, meet the restrictions (read it: http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/06/14/disney.death.ap/index.html) and should not have been on the ride. However, I understand where the excitement of wanting to go on a ride and being two inches too short can come into play - I myself have snuck past the restrictions on a few occassions when I was younger.

What a damn pity. The poor family. I'd love to go and give them all a hug.
 

Brother Michael

macrumors 6502a
Apr 14, 2004
717
0
eRondeau said:
I'm no expert on the physics of thrill rides however I remember reading that one of the reasons for height restrictions is due to the physics of the forces exerted by these rides on the body. Several people suffered neck injuries on a rollercoaster at an amusement park (Ohio?) a few years ago and it was determined that they were all exactly the same height. The rotating action of the rollercoaster looping around the radius of the track concentrated the centrifigual forces at a certain point above the seat of the rollercoaster car. Unfortunately for those who were injured, that point was a weak area in their neck.
Was it Cedar Pointe?

Or Kings Island?

I went to Disney World when I was in 6th grade. I will never forget it but all the same I want to go back.

Mike
 

Daveway

macrumors 68040
Jul 10, 2004
3,375
0
New Orleans / Lafayette, La
I feel sorry for the boy's family, but I hope they don't sue Epcot. It's not their fault. They put up the warning signs and the people going on it know about its reputation.

I don't know about y'all but this makes me want to go on it.
 
StarbucksSam said:
I feel so sorry for the parents of the child. He did not, however, meet the restrictions (read it: http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/06/14/disney.death.ap/index.html) and should not have been on the ride. However, I understand where the excitement of wanting to go on a ride and being two inches too short can come into play - I myself have snuck past the restrictions on a few occassions when I was younger.

What a damn pity. The poor family. I'd love to go and give them all a hug.
What part of the article are you reading? It says he DID meet the height restrictions.

I wouldn't doubt if the kid had a heart attack. Sounds like he was literally scared to death.

Many of us can have health problems that are only discovered through trying events. I wonder what the autopsy will find...

Very sad and unfortunate.
 

Xenious

macrumors 6502a
Mar 22, 2004
674
41
Texas, USA
jayscheuerle said:
My coworker read it exactly the same way. Of course, everybody is looking for it to say he did NOT meet the height restrictions, so that's what they see...
I honestly read it the exact same way....creepy. It was a pretty intense ride and when it kicks in at the first it sure feels different. Pretty fun tho.
 

aloofman

macrumors 68020
Dec 17, 2002
2,206
0
Socal
I remember waiting in line for a coaster at Six Flags Magic Mountain one time and a little girl was re-measured just before getting on because the attendant wasn't sure she was tall enough. She wasn't, by no more than an inch, and she wasn't allowed to ride. People standing in line booed and urged them to let her on anyway. Later I wondered, if they had bent the rules and let her ride, and she'd been injured in some way, how guilty would they have felt?

Shouldn't rides have an age minimum too, in addition to a height requirement? I'm no expert, but 2Gs seems a little high for a four-year-old.
 

wdlove

macrumors P6
Oct 20, 2002
16,570
0
A very sad case. Hopefully the autopsy will provide answers to what happened. My prayers go out to Daudi Bamuwamye's family and friends. May he rest in peace. Makes is so difficult with the loss of a 4 year old. :(
 

crachoar

macrumors 6502a
Mar 22, 2004
569
0
Ohio
powermac666 said:
Well, you know they will still have a magical experience. DW is a biggie...
Yes, so your child can enjoy all of the zany cartoon chracters he didn't grow up with.

Man, I feel bad for kids today. No good cartoons for them - especially on the weekends.

I can imagine how fun it would be to take your kid to a place where he doesn't recognize any of the characters...

'And when I was a boy, this cartoon was really popular! Let's go on the ride based on it!'

'Dad, this is gay. I want to go home and play Tony Hawk.'

On topic of the dead kid

For a second there, I thought he died on 'Space Mountain', at which point, I would be forced to laugh - having been on that ride about 30,000 times as a kid.

Never had a chance to be on this new Mars one. Sounds pretty cool though. As for his death? Nothing to say really. I'm sure it all fits into some 'plan' and that he's in a 'better place' now, right (sarcasm)?

It could've been a combination of things, but I'm not about to guess...

Why you shouldn't take your kid to Disney World

From what I remember, all of the rides at Disney / Epcot were pretty pussed out. The only real rollercoaster they had was 'Splash Mountain'. If you wanted to ride something intense, your best bet was to stick with Cedar Point. Either way, you're making your kid stand in line all day, sweating his ass off and hating his life, only to make up for it for sixty seconds of fun.

Really, that kid stood a better chance of dying from heat stroke or dehydration, waiting four hours to get onto one of those dumpy, overhyped rides, without anything to drink. I remember how terrible it was, having to stand out there in that delicious Florida heat, day after day.

Do your kids a favor - don't make them stand out in that crappy heat unless you plan on buying them about $200 worth of fluids, an electric fan and at least fifty of those wax-coated strawberry popsicles. And remember, everything costs an 'arm and a leg' there.

To be honest, Disney World wasn't all that great. I went there practically every summer as a child - not once was I 'blown away' by it. It was almost a punishment. You had to wake up early, cover your body in sun-tan lotion, take a frozen bottle of water. drive there, leave your walk-man in the car to melt, park - walk a mile to the parking lot tram - get dropped off somewhere within a two mile radius of the booth, walk thirty miles under the Saharan sun, increase your chances of skin cancer, get to the 'stamp-your-hand' booth - drink all of your water within the first two minutes - commit to a religion in hopes of A/C, wait in line for at least 45 minutes per ride. And then? You got to do all of that over again, in reversed order...

The only things that made up for it were the Star Wars ride at MGM (gone, apparently?), the Muppets 4D movie, Mr. Toad's Wild Ride (which they got rid of! bastards!) and Splash Mountain. Everything else was just dumb, but my parents insisted that we loved it (e.g. 'Pirates of the Caribbean'). The only reason we went on the crappy rides so often (e.g. 'Haunted Mansion') is because the lines were short, and they had A/C.

In the end, we always went home, wishing we could've just stayed at the house, out of the heat, either swimming, playing video games or watching movies.

The first time I went, I was maybe five or six - the Dumbo ride was fun. But, of course, that was partially because I had watched Disney cartoons growing up.

If your kid doesn't watch Disney Cartoons (which I don't think is even possible anymore), they aren't really going to love it as much. I'd suggest taking them to the water park instead. It's not as hot, and they have this big artificial river thing that goes around the 'island' - it was a lot more fun than the crappy coasters. However, the simulated 'tsunami' or whatever? Bad idea. It's this big, crashing wave, right? Only the ground is concrete. So when the wave hits you, you grind into the concrete. Not so much fun.

Just put yourself in your kids' shoes (something that parents can't seem to ever do, for whatever reason).