4hdd/11/40000004: Sata (0,0)

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by TheNextBigThing, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. TheNextBigThing macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Location:
    Pearl of the Orient
    #1
    Hi!

    My mid-2009 13-inch Macbook Pro's performance deteriorated last month. It become super super slow.

    So, out of curiosity, I performed an Apple Extended Hardware Test. And here is the error code: 4HDD/11/40000004: SATA (0,0)

    I didn't expect that problem to arise so I don't have any back-up of my essential files. I tried to copy my files to an external drive but copying a 600MB folder required me to wait for more than 30 min before receiving the error code which said somthing like "files cannot be copied"

    Then, I bought a new 60GB Kingston SSDnow V+ and 4GB Trascend 1066Mhz RAM. I successfully installed Snow Leopard on my new SSD and installed the new 4GB memory. Things went well. I even booted my mac so fast using my new SSD via USB enclosure.

    But the problem came when I installed my new drive internally. Flashing question mark appears when starting my Mac. Internal drive is also not recognized by Disk utility when booting my Mac from OS X Installation Disk. Installed my old drive and no success.

    I don't know if the problem is the compatibility of my SSD or the SATA cable. For now, I'm booting my Mac on my new SSD via a USB External Enclosure. My old drive is installed internally but it is not recognized. And I find it too inconvenient to use my Mac booting externally (even though the performance is ultra fast) since I'm a college student.

    My problems:
    a. What to do so that my SSD will be recognized when connected on my Mac internally via SATA?
    b. What to do so that I can have a back-up of my very essential files saved on my old drive?
    (I remember booting from my old drive connected via USB Enclosure took me more than 1 hour, then logging in to enter my password took me to watch that spinning rainbow wheel forever)

    P.S. Sorry if you find grammatically incorrect sentences.
    I also leave here in the Philippines. And there is no Apple Store here. Apple Authorized Service Centers don't sell the SATA cable. Purchasing the cable via internet is not feasible due to the following reasons: a. My location. b. I'm still a student and I don't have a credit card to pay an online purchase.

    Your generous help will be much appreciated.

    Here's additional info on my Mac:

    Model Name: MacBook Pro
    Model Identifier: MacBookPro5,5
    Processor Name: Intel Core 2 Duo
    Processor Speed: 2.26 GHz
    Number Of Processors: 1
    Total Number Of Cores: 2
    L2 Cache: 3 MB
    Memory: 4 GB
    Bus Speed: 1.07 GHz
    Boot ROM Version: MBP55.00AC.B03
    SMC Version (system): 1.47f2
    Serial Number (system): xxxxxxxxxxx
    Hardware UUID: 84AA25C3-B3EC-5FD4-B9EA-03885D9E41B6

    Regards, Christ Denn - Philippines
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    If the new drive worked externally but not internally, did you try using the old drive in an external enclosure?

    If you did then that would point to a possible problem with the logic board and not the drive.
     
  3. TheNextBigThing thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2012
    Location:
    Pearl of the Orient
    #3
    I remember when I boot from my old drive connected via USB Enclosure. It took me more than 1 hour, then logging in to enter my password took me to watch that spinning rainbow wheel forever.

    Is it possible for me to retrieve/back-up all my files on my old drive?
     
  4. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #4
    Doesn't sound like that could be the case.

    I recommend taking it to an authorized apple dealer and having them diagnose the issue? If it is the drive, then your only option of getting your data is using a software that specializes in this, or better yet a service that retrieve data from damaged/non functioning drives. The latter solution can be expensive though
     

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