6 vs 6 Plus camera

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by photogpab, Sep 11, 2014.

  1. photogpab macrumors 6502

    photogpab

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    Jun 21, 2010
    #1
    I keep seeing people say the 6+ has a better camera and that the 6 has essentially the same camera as the 5S.

    I thought both phones had the exact same camera with the only difference being that the 6+ had some special optical stabilization?

    Camera is a big selling point for me and I already have a 5S... and I think the 6+ is too big.
     
  2. Menel macrumors 603

    Menel

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    #2
    OIS is signficant.

    Because the image is stabilized, the exposure time can be increased, allowing for more light capture in low light scenarios, without hand shake effecting as much.

    Instead of 1/15 of a second, it can go longer, 1/8, 1/4, without the photo getting fuzzy.
     
  3. tgi macrumors 65816

    tgi

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    #3
    What Menel said.


    The camera is the same sans the OIS.
     
  4. drogba macrumors member

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    Aug 12, 2014
    #4
    As the fellas above me said, same camera just stabilized. Just boils down to what specifically about these cameras is most important to you. If the stabilization thing is a feature you'd benefit from, you're likely going to have to go with the plus.
     
  5. Imory macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Let's not get ahead of ourselves here. That's questionable and then only way we'll know is by future reviews. Preferably Anandtech or similar. The Verge had an interesting piece written today on the cameras of both phones.

    Picking a new iPhone: there's only one decision that matters

    To understand how important (or not) OIS is in a phone, it's important to understand how it actually works and what it actually does. OIS has been around in DSLR lenses and point-and-shoot cameras for over a decade, and other smartphone manufacturers have been putting it in their devices for years before Apple jumped on board. It is designed to counteract hand-shake and camera movement, by literally moving elements of the camera's lens in the opposite directions of the photographer's movements. This allows for taking sharp pictures with longer shutter speeds than would otherwise be possible. Longer shutter speeds let more light into the camera's sensor, allowing for brighter pictures in low light environments. It's long been billed as the savior for low light photography and it lets you use a really big zoom lens on your DSLR or mirrorless camera without a tripod. OIS is most effective when you have a long focal length, because that magnifies any uncontrollable movements you might have.

    But, and here's the key misunderstanding with OIS, it is only able to correct for movement on the camera's side. If you have a longer shutter speed, unless your subject is inanimate and perfectly still, it's more likely that your subject will move in the time that the camera is taking the picture, causing motion blur that the OIS system can do nothing to correct for. You've seen this before, often times when you try to take a picture of a frisky pet or active toddler indoors, they move during the shot, causing a blurry limb or loss of sharpness in key areas such as the face. Having OIS in a camera does not resolve this problem, and in fact, a lot of smartphone manufacturers have exacerbated the issue by relying too heavily on the feature and holding the shutter open for longer than would otherwise be necessary. (I've personally seen this with every smartphone I've reviewed that has OIS, including models from HTC, LG, and Nokia.) And since smartphone's have wide lenses, OIS is less effective than it would be on your DSLR with a 300mm zoom lens.

    The fact is, most of the pictures people take with smartphones are of other people, which are living, breathing, and yes, moving subjects. The most important factor in getting sharp pictures of people is shutter speed — it needs to be fast enough to freeze the subject.

    That isn't to say the OIS feature has no purpose — it's really great for getting sharp pictures of buildings at night or those cool nighttime cityscapes. They aren't moving and will surely sit still long enough for the camera to use a longer shutter speed. OIS can also be effective for stabilizing video. It can also be argued that OIS is more effective in the iPhone 6 Plus (and possibly more necessary) than it would be in the iPhone 6 because its larger size can be more difficult to hold steady.

    By all accounts, it appears that everything else about the cameras in the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus are the same. According to Apple, they have the same resolution, same sensors, same focus system, same lens, same flash, and same new camera processing features. They also have the same video recording features, including slow-motion, 1080p recording, and something Apple calls "Cinematic Stabilization." But in the vast majority of still photography situations, these cameras are likely to produce the exact same results.
     
  6. photogpab thread starter macrumors 6502

    photogpab

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    Jun 21, 2010
    #6
    I have no idea which one to order. I want the best camera and I do like the 1080p screen... but the 5.5" is just so huge! Feels like I'm holding an iPad mini (which I already own)
     
  7. Imory macrumors 6502a

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    #7
    I honestly doubt the OIS will contribute to a significant difference. In suspect they'll both be identical in daylight, but 6+ might have a small edge in low light conditions and night time. Apart from that, every component within the cameras are identical.

    I advise you to wait for the reviews. Anandtech and GSMArena. Ars Technica aren't too bad either.
     
  8. bchreng macrumors 65816

    bchreng

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    #8
    If you don't mind traveling with the larger 6 Plus with you everywhere, you could sell your iPad Mini and use the money from that towards your iPhone purchase.

    Hmm... Good point! A lot of the pictures I take are of food and friends at restaurants, indoors during the evening hours. If that's the case, I should see a large benefit from IOS right?
     
  9. ronm99 macrumors 6502

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    #9
    OIS can be very significant. I have OIS on several of my SLR lenses, and it is HUGE. A previous poster said that OIS only corrects camera shake which is true, and OIS will not help capture your children running at an indoor sports meet.

    However, if the subject tries to remain still for a photo, camera shake is far more significant than any movement they might make, and OIS will help a LOT.

    That being said, I don't know how good the OIS in the iPhone really is. My SLR lenses give a 4-stop benefit, but I doubt the iPhone will improve things that much.

    Also, people are forgetting video. OIS should help a lot with smoothing shaky hands while filming video.

    For me, OIS is a big deal.
     
  10. Imory macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    OIS should be an improvement in low light conditions. As long as the object you're taking is inanimate and not moving. Apple has always provided a good digital IS so it really remains to be seen how much of an improvement this will be. I don't want to speculate too much since obviously no one here really knows for sure.

    In the vast majority of still photography, they're likely to produce the exact same type of results.

    ----------

    You can't compare an SLR with the camera modules we see in these phones.

    Regarding your second statement, most people would argue the opposite. Any movement your object makes can render the OIS usefulness. The fact is other manufacturers have done this to a point where shutter is open for a longer period of time than it should be. Hence taking a bad picture.

    We're not forgetting video, but Apple have implemented a "technology" which is marketed towards both phones and the differences we'll see are probably pictures taken in low light conditions.
     
  11. acousticbiker macrumors 6502

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    Jun 28, 2008
    #11
    I thought I heard mention of digital image stabilization on the 6 (vs the optical on 6+). Is this the case? If so, did the 5S have this? And how effective is digital vs optical?
     
  12. Imory macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    Yes, they started implementing it with the 4S.

    We don't really know in this case, so instead of people going bonkers and experiencing panic, what they should do is wait for reviews made by professionals.
     
  13. Nikos macrumors 68000

    Nikos

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    #13
    The sensor is new on the 6/6 Plus VS the 5S. Autofocus is also much faster, which will be more apparent when taking videos of moving objects.

    We have yet to see how well OIS works, but I"m willing to bet it works pretty well.
     
  14. spacemnspiff macrumors 6502a

    spacemnspiff

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    #14
    For my DSLR when I am taking pictures of my kids I never shoot below 1/125. They will be blurry below those speeds. The four stop advantage that you talk about is good only in low light conditions when a good exposure at high shutter speeds in not possible. I dont tend use my DSLR for inanimate objects, family pictures is a priority. I dont use OIS on my DSLR.

    If you shoot in broad daylight on any camera, if the camera shutter speed is higher than 1/100 or 1/125, then OIS is not helping. Because OIS is not fast enough to compensate for the hand motion.
     
  15. ronm99 macrumors 6502

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    #15
    I frequently shoot at very low shutter speeds while indoors, and the OIS definitely helps. If you ask someone to sit still, the blur in the camera is dominated by camera shake and not people's movement.

    I took a birthday picture of my 8-year old daughter with my Canon 24-105 lens with just candles on her cake for light. The shutter speed was 1/8 of a second and the focal length was about 40mm, and the picture turned out beautiful! I just asked her to smile and sit still. I took a couple of shots, and some did not turn out, but a couple were stunning. Without OIS, that would not have been possible.

    Of course if you are trying to shoot moving subjects, OIS will not help at all. Or if you are trying to shoot young children who cannot sit still, it will not help either.

    However, take a look at the sample picture that Apple used to show the benefit of OIS. That picture would not have been possible without OIS and it actually turned out quite well.
     
  16. robostig macrumors member

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    #16
    Digital stabilizer will crop outside of the video in order to "stabilize" the video. No thanks, been there done that. I'd rather take my chance with optical stabilization and if need be, stabilize more by cropping in post.
     
  17. richard371 macrumors 68000

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    #17
    Ois will be great for those who take a pic of everything they eat.
     
  18. Irock619 macrumors 68000

    Irock619

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    #18
    Why don't you just wait until they are released and check them out side by side in the Apple store?
     
  19. jjfactory macrumors newbie

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  20. spacemnspiff macrumors 6502a

    spacemnspiff

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    #20
    I agree thats a good situation for a OIS for 8 year old sitting still. But take a hyper 3 year old and birthday candle blowing, OIS is not useful at all.

    There are situations when OIS is helpful, but for most candid photos OIS is not useful in my situation.

    I saw the picture of the OIS on Apples website, it looks like a good exposure. But might have been taken with a tripod or a stand, not way to know.
     
  21. zhandri macrumors 6502

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    #21
    it's not like optical image stabilization is better than digital! depending on what kind of movement you wanna zero out either one can be better or worse
     
  22. ronm99 macrumors 6502

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    #22
    Whatever works for you. My kids are old enough that they able to stay still for my low shutter speed shots.

    I routinely take photos at very low shutter speeds and the photos are great. They don't all turn out, but OIS is invaluable for me, and it will be a huge help for a lot of people on the iPhone if Apple did a good job of implementing it.

    They wouldn't put OIS on professional lenses if it wasn't useful. You pay about $500 for OIS on Canon's 70-200 f4 lens.

    ----------

    I agree that OIS is not normally useful for young children, but there are a lot of people taking indoor photos that are not of young people. For me personally, OIS is huge.

    I'm also curious if OIS kicks in for video which is also a big deal.

    And I'm sure that Apple didn't fake the shot, although there have been a lot of faked photos out there by other companies, so you never know.
     
  23. spacemnspiff macrumors 6502a

    spacemnspiff

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    #23
    I think we are in agreement. BTW I love the Canon 17-55 f/2.8 that I have.
     

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