720p vs 1080p

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by ppc_michael, Aug 27, 2009.

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  1. ppc_michael Guest

    ppc_michael

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    #1
    I'm shooting a project on an EX3 which has the options of shooting in 720p or 1080p (among others). Are there any advantages to shooting in 720p over 1080p? Here are the only things I can think of:

    - I believe the bitrate is the same regardless of the resolution, so technically 720p would maybe be a little higher quality?

    - Overcranking in 720p24 on the EX3 will get me up to 60 frames per second, while 1080p24 will get me up to 30 fps. I do need to overcrank as much as I can, so definitely 720p for that stuff.

    - Easier on the editing hardware?

    Anything else?
     
  2. jammiefreerider macrumors regular

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    Aug 23, 2006
    #2
    You seem to have answered you own question so all I'd add is; only shoot 1080p if that is your final output res.
     
  3. FSMBP macrumors 68020

    FSMBP

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    Jan 22, 2009
    #3
    In your situation, 720p is clearly the best choice (as you've outlined). The only reason I see that you should shoot in 1080 is that you can play with framing in post (assuming your final project will be in 720p).

    For example, if some shots are unstable, you could apply a stabilizer in post on 1080 clips and the final output will be in great quality on a 720p project. As opposed to applying the stabilizer on 720p clips, which will zoom into the cliip and lose quality. BUT, that's probably the only reason I can think of.
     
  4. TheStrudel macrumors 65816

    TheStrudel

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    #4
    If you're shooting at 60p or 30p, you're not overcranking - just picking the highest available framerate to shoot at. Be aware of what that framerate is going to look like, as it's a subjective quality influence (though if you're not going for a film look, arguably more is better).
     
  5. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #5
    If the OP is shooting 60fps w/the intention of slowing it down to 24fps for playback then he is overcranking. It sounds like overcranking is high on the list of 'wants' so 720p would be the way to go as 30->24fps isn't that noticeable of a slow down.


    Lethal
     
  6. ppc_michael thread starter Guest

    ppc_michael

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    #6
    How does 720p hold up when projected? This will be shown at some theaters (with digital projection). Is it okay? Soft? Does the additional resolution of 1080p hold any significant benefit in this situation?
     
  7. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #7
    A lot of that depends on the projector and the size of the screen. If you have a chance I'd shoot some tests to see how they compare.


    Lethal
     
  8. P-Worm macrumors 68020

    P-Worm

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    #8
    I think you should go for 720p for most (if not all) what you shoot. The only place I would switch to 1080p is if you need to do a special effects shot where having the extra resolution might help you.

    P-Worm
     
  9. maverickHD macrumors newbie

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    #9
    720p vs 1080p

    You're shooting a project on a Sony EX3 and you don't know the differences between 720p and 1080p?

    First of all... For the majority of your projects (really 95% of ALL projects) should be (and will be) shot in 1080P 30 FPS... Always shoot in the highest resolution. However, if you intend to shoot slow motion, the Sony EX3 captures that in 720P. That's a limitation of the EX3.

    If you are editing in Final Cut Pro all these different resolutions can be mixed in the same timeline.

    I think the first thing you should do is purchase Vortex Media's "Mastering the Sony PMW-EX3." Three hours of video tutorials that will save you countless hours and ultimately countless dollars.
     
  10. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #10
    He knows the difference, he's just looking for advice on what to use for an up coming project.

    How can you say the majority of anyone's projects should be shot in 1080p30 w/o when shooting needs can vary drastically from one project to the next and I really doubt 30p will emerge as a dominant frame rate over 24p, 60p or 60i (which will eventually go away once 1080p60 is common).


    Lethal
     
  11. maverickHD macrumors newbie

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    Aug 27, 2009
    #11
    720P vs 1080p

    Do you have ANY video knowledge? I do... 30 years (and counting) in the broadcast field.

    For God sakes man... 30i and 60i are INTERLACED formats... North American TV standard is 1080i. Blu-ray is 1080P. Which is better?

    30fps IS the dominant frame rate for video.

    What could you possibly mean that shooting needs may vary drastically from project to project? Nothing that can be determined by the frame rate... unless you are thinking 24P which is primarily a film look (softer and blurred motion). In any case, you wouldn't shoot 24fps 720P if quality is important.

    Ask yourself, do you see many 720P TV's that are the same price as 1080P? No... That's because you pay more for higher quality...

    To PPC_MICHAEL... Spend $50 on Vortex Media's Mastering the Sony PMW-EX3... Spend $50 on the field guide forget EVERYTHING you've read here. You can thank me later.
     
  12. ppc_michael thread starter Guest

    ppc_michael

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    #12
    Chill out, maybe reread the thread if you are this concerned—you must be misunderstanding something.

    I asked if there were any advantages to shooting 720p over 1080p, just out of curiosity, because I wondered why 720p would be there as an option if the camera was capable of the higher-rez 1080p. I seemed to have answered my own question, and now we're done. I've shot many things on the EX series cameras for network television and do not wish to purchase a guide.
     
  13. maverickHD macrumors newbie

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    Aug 27, 2009
    #13
    Chill Out

    The knowledge comment was meant for Lethal Wolfe.

    As I mentioned in my first post. Sony has you using 720 for SLOW MOTION. That's why the camera is only $8320 and not $30,000.

    If you want to take the advice of some of the other posts... fine. I didn't realize this was about amateur video.

    Good luck.
     
  14. maverickHD macrumors newbie

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    Aug 27, 2009
    #14
    720P vs 1080p

    ppc_michael write: I've shot many things on the EX series cameras for network television and do not wish to purchase a guide.

    Rightttttttttt!!!!!!!
     
  15. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #15
    They say the empty can rattles the most...

    1080i is standard? Really? Better tell that to FOX, ESPN, ABC, etc., 'cause they all b'cast nationally in 720p. Which is better between 1080i and 1080p? Depends on what you are doing. 1080p will obviously be devoid of interlacing artifacts but it's currently limited to lower frame rates (24p, 30p) which makes it less than idea for fast action such as sports. 1080i doesn't have as clean an image but at 60i it provides smooth motion and the look that people associate w/'live'. 1080p60 would obviously be the best of both worlds but that is not part of the ATSC standard so who knows how it will develop down the road.

    30fps progressive is not a dominant frame rate.

    24p, 30p, 60p, and 60i do not look the same (although 60p and 60i are the closest) so what you are shooting and how you want to shoot it will help determine what settings you want to use. For example, if I'm shooting a football game I'll want the smoothest motion I can get which means either 1080i60 or 720p60. Going 720p60 will avoid interlacing artifacts, provide cleaner speed changes, and isn't much more lower res than 1080i60 so progressive comes out ahead in this situation, IMO. If I was shooting a music video at 24fps that used a ton of overcranking I'd go w/720p because of the higher max frame rate. If I was shooting a movie at 24fps that didn't use any overcranking I'd go for 1080p because of the higher res.

    Horses for courses my friend.


    Lethal
     
  16. KeithPratt macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    I can see you have years of experience with computers too, the mastery with which you're using bold and italics and different colours. Exceptional. Well done.
     
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