802.11g adapters work on AEBS' 5 ghz frequency?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by Veritas&Equitas, Sep 28, 2007.

  1. Veritas&Equitas macrumors 68000

    Veritas&Equitas

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Location:
    Twin Cities, MN
    #1
    I've looked for the past few minutes, and can't see to find a concrete answer.

    We have 2 802.11n Macs in the house (my MBP, and another MB), along with 2 computers that have 802.11g routers (older MB, PC).

    Our connections seem to be a bit touchy, and our router has a tendency to drop connection fairly frequently.

    I suspect part of the reason could be that the 2.4 ghz frequency seems pretty crowded both in our house and neighborhood (phones, bluetooth, etc.). Can I upgrade to the AEBS, will the other 802.11g adapters be able to connect to the 5 ghz frequency put out by the AEBS? Should this speed up our network, and bypass much of the problem with conflicting devices on the 2.4 ghz frequency, or can't 802.11g connections connect to the 5 ghz frequency?

    Thanks!
     
  2. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #2
    No. 5GHz is 802.11n and 802.11a only. You could get the g devices to talk a, if they support that, but the range would be fairly low.
     
  3. Veritas&Equitas thread starter macrumors 68000

    Veritas&Equitas

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Location:
    Twin Cities, MN
    #3
    Well, I think the 2 devices that are not 802.11n are 802.11a/b/g compatible, so could I use the AEBS on 5 ghz and have it somehow put out a signal that all 4 could pick up? Like a different mode or something?

    I read something about Legacy mode, and there are 2 others for the AEBS that allow it to run on different connection types...is this what I should be looking into?
     
  4. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #4
    Sorry I meant range, not speed. 802.11a is 54Mbps, just like g. If you can live with the shorter range, than 5GHz might be the ticket.
     
  5. macleod199 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2007
    #5
    I'd make very sure that your older devices support 802.11a, as otherwise they won't be able to do 5 GHz. 802.11a support isn't actually that common. I was also surprised and annoyed to find out that it's pretty much impossible to find even a "802.11n" PCI card that does 5 GHz. I had assumed it would be a requirement of the standard, or at least a common feature. Apple's out front on this one.
     

Share This Page