95% battery capacity after 6 days of use?

Shredder-

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 4, 2012
143
13
I bought my Macbook 13" Late 2011 right before New Year and my battery health is already at 95% (Can't remember if it was ever at 100%). Is it normal?
 

gorskiegangsta

macrumors 65816
Mar 13, 2011
1,279
85
Brooklyn, NY
Battery "health" readings fluctuate. It is perfectly normal. One day it may be 94%, the next day 98%, the next day 96%, etc... Nothing to worry about.

For example: My current battery reading is at 94%, whereas it was only 89% yesterday.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,419
759
I bought my Macbook 13" Late 2011 right before New Year and my battery health is already at 95% (Can't remember if it was ever at 100%). Is it normal?
Image
It is perfectly normal if your battery health (maximum capacity) is less than 100%. It will fluctuate both up and down over time. For further details, read the CHECKING STATUS AND HEALTH section of the link that simsaladimbamba posted.
 

Shredder-

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 4, 2012
143
13
Alright thanks, while I'm at it, are your fans constantly making some kind of noise. no vacuum cleaner or anything, but a like a light "breeze"... my previous macbook (7.1) was dead silent except when i used flash / streaming on random site
 
Nov 28, 2010
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Alright thanks, while I'm at it, are your fans constantly making some kind of noise. no vacuum cleaner or anything, but a like a light "breeze"... my previous macbook (7.1) was dead silent except when i used flash / streaming on random site
Adobe Flash Player is CPU intensive, thus more power is needed to feed the CPU, which results in higher temperatures and often higher fan speed(s) on mobile computers. As more power is used due to Flash, the battery life of mobile computers is shortened by a good bit.
To check, if Adobe Flash Player is responsible for less battery time or the heat, go to Applications / Utilities / Activity Monitor and select to show ALL PROCESSES and sort by CPU.

There are a variety of Flash blockers for all the four major browsers available.
A Flash blocker does what it says, it blocks Flash content, but via a click on the marked Flash object, the Flash object can be activated and used.

  • Safari: ClickToFlash, for which there is an extension and a plug-in; CTF allows you to download YouTube and other kinds of MPEG-4 encoded video too.
  • Opera: has a built-in Flash blocker
  • Firefox: Flashblock is an add-on to block Flash
  • Chrome: FlashBlock is an extension to block Flash

Also make sure to have the latest Adobe Flash Player version running, you can get it here.​
 

Shredder-

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 4, 2012
143
13
Adobe Flash Player is CPU intensive, thus more power is needed to feed the CPU, which results in higher temperatures and often higher fan speed(s) on mobile computers. As more power is used due to Flash, the battery life of mobile computers is shortened by a good bit.
To check, if Adobe Flash Player is responsible for less battery time or the heat, go to Applications / Utilities / Activity Monitor and select to show ALL PROCESSES and sort by CPU.

There are a variety of Flash blockers for all the four major browsers available.
A Flash blocker does what it says, it blocks Flash content, but via a click on the marked Flash object, the Flash object can be activated and used.

  • Safari: ClickToFlash, for which there is an extension and a plug-in; CTF allows you to download YouTube and other kinds of MPEG-4 encoded video too.
  • Opera: has a built-in Flash blocker
  • Firefox: Flashblock is an add-on to block Flash
  • Chrome: FlashBlock is an extension to block Flash

Also make sure to have the latest Adobe Flash Player version running, you can get it here.​
That's some very useful information, thank you. Not only is it Flash, but when I skype for instance, and have the webcam activated, my fan goes mad. Also, is your macbook (i assume you have a pro) quiet?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,419
759
That's some very useful information, thank you. Not only is it Flash, but when I skype for instance, and have the webcam activated, my fan goes mad. Also, is your macbook (i assume you have a pro) quiet?
The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat (around 100C/212F - 105C/221F, depending on your processor). iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps such as Skype will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help. Also, make sure you don't block the vents, which are located at the rear, near the hinge.

Learn about the fans in your Mac
Apple Portables: Operating temperature

Launch Activity Monitor and change "My Processes" at the top to "All Processes", then click on the CPU column heading once or twice, so the arrow points downward (highest values on top). Then look to see what may be consuming system resources.
 
Nov 28, 2010
22,684
27
located
That's some very useful information, thank you. Not only is it Flash, but when I skype for instance, and have the webcam activated, my fan goes mad. Also, is your macbook (i assume you have a pro) quiet?
Skype is also very CPU intensive when video chatting, as the video stream has to be compressed for faster data transfer, thus the CPU is used.

To monitor your CPU usage, use Activity Monitor as shown below.
______________________________________________________
Have a look at Activity Monitor (Applications / Utilities /) and select All Processes and sort by CPU to see what the culprit may be.
Also check the "System Memory" tab to see what your "Page ins:", "Page outs:" and "Swap used:" are.

image below uses sorting by CPU as an example

Further reading:
______________________________________________________​


____________________________________________________________

Maybe have a look at Advanced Search to find answers to your questions, as they are asked a lot:
____________________________________________________________
 

Shredder-

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 4, 2012
143
13
The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat (around 100C/212F - 105C/221F, depending on your processor). iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps and fan speeds, among other things.

Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps such as Skype will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help. Also, make sure you don't block the vents, which are located at the rear, near the hinge.

Learn about the fans in your Mac
Apple Portables: Operating temperature

Launch Activity Monitor and change "My Processes" at the top to "All Processes", then click on the CPU column heading once or twice, so the arrow points downward (highest values on top). Then look to see what may be consuming system resources.
Thank you so much! I use iStat Pro and the temperature goes up to 91°Celsius when i video chat. (Currently at 87)
I actually built my own thing for the fan. It's just two "pillows" at the top two corners of the back. I think it helps.

 
Last edited:

thundersteele

macrumors 68030
Oct 19, 2011
2,984
7
Switzerland
Alright thanks, while I'm at it, are your fans constantly making some kind of noise. no vacuum cleaner or anything, but a like a light "breeze"... my previous macbook (7.1) was dead silent except when i used flash / streaming on random site
The noise you hear when the computer is idle might be your HDD. Usually I can only hear my fans when they are above 3000 rpm.
 
Nov 28, 2010
22,684
27
located
I am worried my battery capacity was from 97% last week then today It's 94%. My computer is only less than month old.
It is normal most of the time.
You could try calibrating it and just use it the damn Mac.
Have you read the Battery FAQ yet, that has been linked to in the first two replies?
 
Nov 28, 2010
22,684
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located
...or not calibrating it, since that one doesn't need it. But yes, it would be nice if people would read a thread when they join it.
I thought so too, as you mentioned it before, but you also said, one could, thus my reaction.

In the end it doesn't matter, it is just a thread of first world problems anyway.