A+ certification

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by 63dot, Jan 5, 2015.

  1. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #1
    I have been a PC techie for a long time and originally started off the bat with MS certification and then worked in the field. Most of us don't have degrees/certs but I have both but never needed to put it on resumes.

    But with many changes from PC moving to smart phones, the latest updated A+ certification may be a good thing these days.

    What's the best path to A+?

    Books, online tutorials/transcenders?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. LIVEFRMNYC macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    #2
    I took my A+ long ago(about 15 years). I studied the questions from Pass4sure and 75% of those questions are on the real test. I've heard Pass4sure is still as good nowadays. Also, more companies are deeming the A+ as worthless, Network+ is where to start nowadays. Pass4sure also helped me pass that one.
     
  3. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #3
    Thanks, I will check out that site, too.

    When I got my MCP about 15 years ago, it was said Microsoft was useless and CCNA was better but then when Cisco's growth was hampered in dot.com, then it was back to MCP and A+. Those certs are short term and I only want A+ and maybe Network+ and not stick to certain company for now. I think it's good for oldtimers to re-up with certs from time to time.

    Transcender had almost all the questions of the real MCP test on Windows NT but I also wanted to understand the concepts inside out which I did beforehand. There's the test, the concepts, and as we know the real world as we have seen and they could all be different. I know I want to do the transcenders and I won't go in cold like a few CS and EE degree holders who thought it would be a cakewalk and walked out less than 50% percent correct on live test.
     
  4. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2014
    Location:
    North Country (way upstate NY)
    #4
    At my work you NEED A+, Net+, and Security+ to be allowed access to the network as an administrator. If you do not have a CCNA you will probably not get hired so really you need all four.
     
  5. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #5
    That's good to hear the CompTIA certs are still valid. As a PC tech in a small town we really have two levels of techs regardless of certs and/or degrees. The smaller ones travel to homes and businesses and operate out of their home or garage. A few of the larger ones have their own offices or buildings and may or may not do out calls.

    During the height of the PC revolution, but before iPhones and mostly affordable laptops, the PC stores ended up buying the building they were renting and sometimes the whole building complex. Those days are largely gone and it's just another occupation. Those were dark days for Apple and Microsoft looked like they were going to take over the world spreading a basically (then) inferior operating system (Windows 3.1 vs OS 8.1, Windows 95 vs. OS 9, etc).
     
  6. luvmymbpr macrumors regular

    luvmymbpr

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2014
    #6
    The A+ certification has a horrible reputation. Even if they've changed it, most companies still consider it garbage. As was said before, network+ and security+ are where it's at. MCSE and other high up microsoft certs are also super valuable.
     
  7. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Location:
    norcal
    #7
    The local shop in small town, about $3 mil per year, only has A+ and Microsoft techie banners as you walk in. I know there's Cisco, which they have, and Oracle, which they have but those banners aren't displayed and it's also not on their business cards. Mostly in small town local businesses and individuals only know of A+ and Microsoft, probably because those relate most to their business or home.

    But not far away in Silicon Valley, you hear of super specialized techs who are certified to work on industry level printers, copiers, servers and stuff I have never heard of (usually through Sun, Dell, HP, or even some company I have never heard of related to POS) which has techies who make several hundred thousand a year but their demand is in the big cities. My friend was a certified POS/laser/touchscreen specialist and they billed out at hundreds per hour back in the 1990s. He only got $40K a year as a Heald College intern but his boss made millions a month but such is the higher end techies.
     

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