A Couple DSLR Beginner Questions...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by TimJim, Dec 15, 2007.

  1. TimJim macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #1
    OK i have a Nikon D80 and i have a couple questions if you guys can answer them.

    1) How do I set it to no flash but have the shutter open and close as quick as it would with flash on? (ex. Picture of christmas tree with lights off in room and no flash, but the shutter open for too long and causing it to blur)

    2) How do i set it to burst shot?

    3) What type of photo should i set it to (RAW? JPEG?)
     
  2. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #2
    Shoot in manual mode - you can set the aperture and shutter speed to whatever you'd like. For this type of shot, though, I'd suggest shooting off a tripod - that'll address the "blur" problem you mentioned.

    There's a button that looks like three boxes superimposed on each other - that'll let you rotate through the various shutter modes.

    I shoot RAW - I think it gives you the most control over your final image. If your goal is to get the maximum number of shots per second, though, you'll need to shoot JPEG.
     
  3. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #3
    You may set it to manual (the "M") or speed priority (the "S"). Speed priority will allow you to set the speed and the computer will calculate the aperture accordingly. Of course, you'll probably end up with a really dark shot–as noted above, a tripod would be a good idea.

    See above.

    If you're asking, JPEG.
     
  4. Digital Skunk macrumors 604

    Digital Skunk

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2006
    Location:
    In my imagination
    #4
    (1) Already answered...

    (2) Already answered...

    (3) It doesn't really matter, however, if you DO want to get the most out of EDITING your images shoot RAW and make sure you have the space to hold all of that info. There isn't anything inherently wrong with JPGs unless you don't mind your camera doing the image processing, and on the D80 the in camera processing is actually pretty darn good, in many ways it's a little better than the D2xs and D200.
     
  5. TimJim thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    #5
    Well i set it to the 3 Box thing as my setting and it still didnt take a burst shot, am i doing something wrong here?
     
  6. Digital Skunk macrumors 604

    Digital Skunk

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2006
    Location:
    In my imagination
    #6
    You won't be able to take 3 bursts in a row if you can't get focus to lock. It also won't be able to do bursts if the shutter speed is slower than the lag between the shots.
     
  7. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #7
    …and remember, you need to hold the shutter to get a burst going.
     
  8. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #8
    About the only why this is going to work is to get a tripod. Or just a bean bag. Set the camera down on some suport and then set the self timer so the shutter trips while your hand is not bumping the camera. This will solve the blur you are seeing from camera shake.

    In general, you can hand hold a shot up to 1/(lens focal length) so if the lens is set to 30mm you can hold a shot at 1/30th of a second. How to control the shutter - set the wheel to "shutter priority mode" then rotate the control wheel to 1/30th but there is almost certainly not enough light for a shot at that speed, so the about suggestion to use a tripod.

    I think a basic photography book might be a good investment.

    After reading the book you will know how to balance the light from the flash with ambient light and that likely want to bounce the flash off the back wall or ceiling
     
  9. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #9
    You aren't trying to take burst shots of a Christmas tree are you? The tree will wait will set up each shot. If you are then I bet the camera is refusing to do what it is told when it makes no sense, like if the shutter speed is very slow.
     
  10. KidneyPi macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2007
    #10
    I can't help with the first two questions. I'm a Canon user. As for your third question, this is the vi vs emacs holywar of photography. Use what is right for you. I mainly use RAW because it has more information in the file. With no compression, I'm free to adjust exposure and color at will in post. It is also possible to do single exposure HDR that looks good.

    JPEG is great if you want speed and don't plan to do much post processing. It can introduce some image noise, but you have to hunt hard to find it in most cases. It drops the extra information that allows you to have exposure control in post so that it can be a smaller file.

    You will find pros and amateurs in both camps. Use what is right for you. When I started, I used mainly JPEG. Today, I only use it if I need to quickly give the pictures to someone else and I won't have time to go through my workflow in Aperture.
     
  11. Jeremy! macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    #11
    You can always put the D80 in auto with the flash off. Hold the flash button near the side of the lens down while you use the scroll wheel to select the crossed out flash icon on the top display. To get the most out of the D80 though, you really need to read the whole manual - trust me it is pretty boring, but necessary.

    As far as the xmas tree shot, you could boost the ISO setting, but I really think the best is a slow exposure with a tripod etc. Do expect the overall color of the image to be skewed towards the color of the tree lights. You might want to try shooting with low light for a long exposure, and then turn the xmas tree lights on at the end of the exposure so you get the tree exposed nicely with the tree lights 'added' in at the end.

    One thing that drives me nuts about the D80, is it's willingness to take over control. I suppose it is a necessary evil, but if you are in auto and AF, it will not take a photo if it does not know you are focused. So mess around with the burst mode with lots of light on a easy to focus image, like a distant landscape etc.

    As far as what format, unless you are planning on doing a lot of messin' with the image after you take the shot .jpgs are fine.
     
  12. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #12
    That's another part of what steered me away from the D80, I like that the flash on my camera stays down unless I release it my self. There's no setting to change, it's just that way all the time.

    SLC
     
  13. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #13
    If the D80 is like the D70, this "flash problem" only occurs in auto mode. Switch it to Program and it won't happen.
     
  14. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #14
    1) You can use "Shutter priority" (S on the command dial) if you want a specific shutter speed and to have the camera figure out the aperture, you can use Aperture priority (A) to do the opposite, or (M) to set both the aperture and shutter independently- however you're not likely to get a good exposure of the tree and the lights both without a long exposure on a tripod or stable surface because the tree in the dark room is going to be underexposed if you meter for the lights, and the lights will be overexposed if you meter for the tree. That's why you got the suggestion to expose the tree properly and turn the lights on for the last bit of the exposure- that's only easy to do if you get a multi-second exposure though.

    Without the flash's light, if you set the camera the same as you would if you have flash, you're likely to end up with a mostly black picture.

    2) Just in case you don't realize it, you have to hold the shutter button down in burst mode to get multiple exposures.

    3) If you've got the space on your memory card, you can shoot raw+jpeg with one of the differing JPEG quality levels.

    If you can't find your manual, you can get a copy online at:

    http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/noprint/D80_noprint.pdf

    Unless you're in continuous focus mode (AF-C) mode which doesn't have focus lock requirements.


    According to page 40 of the D80 manual, you only get pop-up flash in full-auto, portrait, close-up and night portrait modes. Since those are basically all point and shoot modes I'd expect anyone who didn't want that behavior would simply use Program, Manual, Aperture-priority or Shutter-priority modes like all the other Nikon DSLRs with built-in flash or without the P&S modes.

    Basically, Nikon took the P&S "beginner" settings of the D40 and the P/S/A/M "Normal" modes that Nikon's had since at least the early 90's on all their SLR cameras and put them all on the D80's function wheel. Presumably under the assumption that they'd be selling lots of D80's to first-time dSLR users or D40 users upgrading, both categories of users who might be at the "big point and shoot" skillset level. If you want "big P&S w/o the automatic flash" mode, it's P on the command dial.
     
  15. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #15
    I'm afraid to say that you simply haven't invested enough time getting to know your camera. If you had changed the shooting mode from Auto (which is really for people that come from P&S cameras) to P, you would have to activate the flash manually. This also works in A, S, and M, obviously.
     
  16. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #16
    I've spent 10 months getting to know my camera (10,000 frames so far) what makes you assume I've not spent enough time getting to know it? I use a Pentax DSLR, it's flash is always activated manually even in the "auto" modes. Pentax knows that I'll activate the flash when I want it, (which is basically never) the camera never tries to spring up the flash on me when I'm not wanting it to do so. I admittedly didn't know that the D80 had a way of disabling this, but I like that my camera is set that way by default.

    SLC
     
  17. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #17
    The next sentence does (see below). You could have posted a thread or read the manual.
    Then switch to P -- that's why P and Auto are different.
     
  18. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #18
    Ah! There's been a confusion… stupid pronouns.

    To clarify: whenever SLC says "my camera" he doesn't mean a D80; he means his Pexntax. Ergo, he knows his Pentax, but not the D80!

    SLC: You understand where Oreo got confused?
     
  19. RaceTripper macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    #19
    Get the book "Understanding Exposure." Once you understand the basics from that, knowing how to setup your camera will come to you much easier.

    As for RAW vs. JPEG. A big advantage of RAW is that you can correct white balance problems very easily, while with JPEG your options are considerably less.
     
  20. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #20
    The way I understood him, he exchanged his D80 in favor of a Pentax, because (to put it bluntly) he didn't know his D80. So I'm aware he uses a Pentax now, but I inferred he used to use a D80.
     
  21. SLC Flyfishing Suspended

    SLC Flyfishing

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #21
    Nope I had a bag full of Nikon lenses, I went out to make my decision between the D80 and the D200 after being up to that point a Nikon shooter exclusively. My wife had a Pentax with only one cruddy lens, but she wanted the Nikon too, (because that's what the Pro's use :) ). Well I tried the Nikons out and was wholly unimpressed by both, they just seemed to lack anything to make them stand out compared to the other options I had. Then the camera salesman pointed out the K10D to me and upon shooting a few frames with it, and feeling it in our hands we both decided that this was the better camera for us. I've since been able to sell most of my Nikon glass (I've kept 2 lenses for use with an old F2 that I've still got), and now have some very nice Pentax gear. I've never been more happy with any of my other cameras, not even close, and this would be considered to be just a midlevel camera.

    What still pleases me most about the K10D compared to the competition is the level of control that I have over the camera at all times. There is nothing automatic about it unless you set it that way. And instead of those chintzy scene modes that all the other DSLR's are afflicted with, I have an ISO priority mode and a Shutter/Aperture priority mode etc.

    SLC
     
  22. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #22
    All dslrs come with P, A, S and M, and have been for years. Nikon also has Auto ISO, so these are hardly things that make the K10D stand out. Everything is as manual as I want it to be. (Don't get me wrong, it is a nice camera with a very good price/performance.) I also wish Nikon and Canon would just get rid of these ridiculous scene modes (even the 40D has them!), I don't need this stuff, they just waste space on that shooting mode dial. But then again, I have never used them.
     
  23. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #23
    Tell me about it! It's insane to have those options on the upper-end cameras.
    Of course, there's also something to be said for trying to attract the "more $$$ = better picture" consumer crowd with money to burn.
     
  24. RaceTripper macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    #24
    The Nikon D200 is a very controllable and configurable camera. It has Shutter, Aperture, and ISO priority, plus full manual mode. It doesn't have any of the preset modes at all. It also has many options for fine tuning. I love it. I shoot with a 17-55/2.8 DX, a 50/1.8D, and the 70-200/2.8 VR. I mostly shoot motorsports for which it works very well (AF with the 70-200 is wicked fast). Now I'm thinking about adding a D300 to my kit.
     
  25. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #25
    Yup. I can understand if they decide to include them with entry-level models. But the D80 and especially the 40D are not entry-level models anymore! I have no use whatsoever for them and wish I could instead have custom settings memory slots or what not …*Plus, it confuses people into thinking, they have no control over what the camera does.
     

Share This Page