A few questions about HD video

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by mbell75, Nov 2, 2007.

  1. mbell75 macrumors 6502

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    #1
    I am looking to make the jump to HD video. Can imovie 08 handle editing HD video? Can iDVD make an HD DVD? How hard is it to work with? Thanks
     
  2. fart macrumors regular

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    #2
    iMovie does HD, haven't played with it myself, but I know it has been able to do it for at least a revision or 2. As far as I know, iDVD cannot author/burn HD-DVDs, even onto standard DVDs, DVD studio pro can.

    Arg, we just need an HD-DVD burner!!! Come on!

    once you go HD, everything else looks like crap. Just warning you :)
     
  3. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #3
    yeah , i think the only problem right now is getting the video onto a disk
     
  4. fart macrumors regular

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    #4
    Yes. btw. Walmart has HD-DVD players on sale TODAY for $98! I have burnt HD content to standard DVDs and played them back on this unit (Toshiba A2) with great success. might be something to think about....then run to walmart...
     
  5. seany916 macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Stick with DV for now. Until HD content can be distributed more easily, save yourself the extra aggravation.
     
  6. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #6
    that's not bad i guess. but how much can you fit on 1 dvd?

    yeah i agree. it's too much of a headache right now (even though it does look great)
     
  7. Alican macrumors regular

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    #7
    I say go for HDV is you want it. I've been using HDV Cam for about 18 months. All the final edits get written back to tape in HDV. Though I can only make standard DVDs (by recapturing from tape using the camera's downconverter and loading the clip into idvd) and have a normal TV, in the future, when HD/Blue Ray burners, players and HD TVs get cheaper I can recapture final productions and make HD versions.

    Each to their own, but not shooting in HDV now would be a bit like if producers said, years ago, why make this in colour as most people have black and white TVs
     
  8. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #8
    i have to disagree, unless you're making money off of these videos. that analogy doesn't apply
     
  9. scamateur macrumors member

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    #9
    What "work flow" do you use to produce the HD burn to standard DVD? Thanks!

    I completely agree with the idea of recording in HDV even if HD "distribution" media is not (yet) widespread. Even if you are just a hobbyist/family-man recording, why not have the best possible images? In the near future, when you want to look at your videos, you'll be glad you did. In the far-off future, your children will mock you less for the quality of your home videos!
     
  10. Alican macrumors regular

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    #10
    One workflow is to do your HD production in iMovie and then 'share' it via iDVD. iDVD will downconvert the HD to standard DVD but the quality is awful.

    The workflow I use is, once I've written the final production to tape, I switch on the camera's downconverter on and then import the production into an SD project. I do this with final cut express and bring the captured video into iDVD. The quality is much better. HDV cameras' downconverters are far superior.

    However, I've noticed in iMovie, even if I have the camera's downconverter on, iMovie reads the cam's rom which identifies it as an HDV cam, and thinks "this is an HDV cam, I will only accept HDV footage from it". This is the problem with programs like iMovie where the author is certainly told that user does NOT know best. However, as I hardly use iMovie, someone may know a workaround.
     
  11. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #11
    as far as using HDV now, if you're just gonna burn a regular dvd with the footage and keep it on tape for later, that's a lot of tapes piling up.
     
  12. zioxide macrumors 603

    zioxide

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    #12
    Most HDV cams can also shoot in regular DV mode, so buy an HD cam but shoot in DV until distro gets easier. Then you won't have to buy a new cam in 2 years or so.
     
  13. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #13
    yeah, but you might end up spending less money by buying a $300 SD camera now, and then in 2 years buy a $300 HD camera, instead of spending over $1000 now
     
  14. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    #14
    Are there other options for for generating a HD-DVD?

    There is iMovie 08 that can edit HD. So can Final cut express HD. These are reasonably priced for an amateur.
    What do you do out the other side? iDVD seems like the obvious choice, but can't do a HD-DVD on a regular DVD.
    There is DVD Studio Pro 4 that can do a HD-DVD on a DVD, but it appears you have to buy Final Cut Studio to get it. So then what is the point in Final Cut Express?
    Are there other tools out there?
    I would like iDVD to be able to do a HD-DVD on DVD disk.
     
  15. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #15
    i know Toast has blu-ray support, not sure if it can do this though
     
  16. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    #16
    My understanding is that Toast can do Blu-ray data disks.
     
  17. Alican macrumors regular

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    #17
    The tapes aren't that big and besides, it's an additoinal long term storage/backup medium. Even if I had an HD player/burner and HD TV now, I would never junk the master tape (that's of the final, I don't keep the rushes).

    I still I have DV masters from 8 years ago when I was shooting DV only
     
  18. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #18
    oh really, well scratch that then.

    yeah, but wants to buy that many tapes?
     
  19. VideOD macrumors newbie

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    #19
    Well a master tape is paramount.. they are really small. In the event you lose your DVD, because of inferior materials used in manufacture of DVDs. That could be a pretty good reason to have the tape as a backup/archive. If you have all of your movies burned to images and stored somewhere where they won't be deleted. Then you are on the right path. No one ever thinks they will lose anything. Point being. I just lost 3 days of video import a couple of days ago. But I still have the tapes. :) I hope I didn't digress too much on this thread. My apologies.
     
  20. Will_reed macrumors 6502

    Will_reed

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    #20
    Forget HD-DVD you can edit your HD video in imovie 08 and then send it to Blu-ray disc via either Toast titanium or you could author one via Adobe encore.
     
  21. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #21
    i agree that it's a good backup, but do you really want to buy a new tape everytime you film something? i'm sure most people wouldn't

    not a bad idea. but you gotta have a blu-ray burner, which isn't cheap
     
  22. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

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    #22
    Tell that to the people that used to shoot on VHS or VHS-C. Most people would shoot and have mountains of tapes of home movies and such. MiniDV is much smaller, better quality, and more reliable as a backup. You can put about 100 miniDV tapes in a shoebox. That's not asking a lot storage-wise for a concrete backup.
     
  23. AviationFan macrumors 6502a

    AviationFan

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    #23
    That's actually what most professionals do. The reason is not just to archive the source, but also to reduce the risk of dropouts on a tape. Therefore, if the client pays for a project, new tapes are used.

    - Martin
     
  24. fart macrumors regular

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    #24
    yes, always run your export to tape, be it HDV or DV. That way you'll have full quality. If the project is what a crap, you'll pony up the $2.50 a tape to cover your ass.
     
  25. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #25
    yeah i can see that for a business, but i was talking about consumer...
     

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