A touchscreen MacBook ever?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by csjcsj, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. csjcsj macrumors regular

    csjcsj

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    Sarasota FL
    #1
    I really want new laptop, but my dream machine would be a touchscreen MBP, or Adobe porting full versions of Illustrator and InDesign to the iPad (not likely). I don’t want to buy a new MBP now in case one with a touch screen might come out, but does anyone have a guess as to whether or not that might really happen?

    I can’t just buy a cheap laptop (Mac or windows) because of the hardware requiments of the Adobe software.
     
  2. theluggage macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #2
    All anybody can offer on this is speculation...

    As such - Apple's "current wisdom" has always been that a touchscreen doesn't work ergonomically on a laptop or desktop because it would be uncomfortable to continually reach over the keyboard ("gorilla arms" syndrome) and that an operating system needs to be optimised for either touch (iOS) or pointer (Mac OS) and can't be both.

    I think there's a lot of validity in that - plus I expect Apple will be sticking to that policy until the day they announce a touch-screen Mac. The workaround to "gorilla arms" is to produce some sort of convertible/hybrid such as Microsofts Surface/Surface Book/Surface Studio range. I doubt that Apple would do that anytime soon because it would self-compete with the iPad range, and all the smoke signals from Apple at the moment is that (sadly) they're far more enthusiastic about the iPad than the Mac.

    So, if I had to guess, I'd say "don't hold your breath" - meanwhile, Adobe has already announced "full" Photoshop CC for iPad so I'd suggest that its marginally more likely that the other CC apps will appear on iPad first.

    What might prove me wrong is Apple's "Project Marzipan" - running iOS Apps on the Mac - and although I'm assuming that will include some sort of translation layer between pointer and touch it could be the incentive for Apple to stick a touchscreen on the Mac.

    NB: Don't shoot the messenger - pretty much every laptop or all-in-one comparable to the Mac includes a touchscreen so IMO Apple should stop faffing around, stick one on and let the users worry about their gorilla arms and greasy fingers. Or, let us run MacOS on the iPad Pro... the last batch of iPads released in October would be far more interesting than the ~Meh Mini or MacBook Meh if only they weren't knobbled with iOS.
     
  3. bigtomato macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2015
    #3
    there are cheap clones of Wacom that let you attach and external type of tablet, I believe its called the XPen, look it up on amazon. Its 15" and works well but only with a pen but haven't tried my fingers. It only cost me $400 Canadian so for what it does its fantastic.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #4
    I agree with Steve Jobs: touchscreen on a notebook is a terrible idea.

    [​IMG]
    "This doesn't work."
     
  5. Pakaku macrumors 68020

    Pakaku

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    Aug 29, 2009
    #5
    Anything touch-related is probably going to be limited to iOS, because the OS is optimized for touch, and because they get to sell more things.

    It would be nice if Apple offered a native way to dock an iPad and stream from a computer to it over a cable or wirelessly. The Pro already supports USB-C, so that should be as much bandwidth as the video feed would need. Duet already proved it's possible, so I don't get why Apple hasn't done it themselves.
     
  6. theluggage macrumors 68040

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    #6
    That's not as bad as a 12.9" iPad with a smart keyboard, where you're forced to reach over the keyboard for many operations that rely on touch... and Apple still offer those.

    The "gorilla arms" argument is based on two premises:
    1. You're going to use the touch screen continually instead of the mouse/trackpad, rather than just some instances where being able to interact with the screen directly is better than using a pointer.
    2. You rule out any thought of designing a "convertible" device where the screen can be swivelled/folded back/removed (as is now offered by most PC makers) for applications that work better with touch.
    Microsoft's Surface, Surface Book and Surface Studio show the way to do it - or would, if MS's prices and tech specs didn't make Macs look like a bargain (plus, google 'sleep of death').

    Apple is unlikely to offer a convertible, because they want you to switch to an iPad and give them a 30% slice of whatever software and services you use.

    I agree. There was an interview about 'Inside Apple's Pro development lab' a year or so ago (can't find it quickly) where they were talking about ways to use Macs and iPads together as a way forward for 'pro' users. Seemed that they'd just re-discovered the Logic Remote app for Logic Pro (which is quite neat - but it has been around for years) and decided it was the best thing since sliced bread so maybe there will be some more progress on that front. However, my impression is that Apple don't want you to use the iPad as a Mac peripheral - they want you to switch to iOS, stop worrying and learn to love the walled garden. After all, why would anybody buy a PC...?
     
  7. king.cobra macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    #7
    My guess is it will still take a few years as they surely wouldn't want to disrupt the ipad sales.

    Also, when they eventually go that route, I think they will initially start with a ipad/macbook hybrid similar to what microsoft did with the surface book
     
  8. SDColorado Contributor

    SDColorado

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    Highlands Ranch, CO
    #8
    Steve Jobs also said ...

    [​IMG]

    ... and yet here we are with an Apple Pencil. I agree with theluggage. The 12.9" iPP with ASK is a far more terrible idea than a MBP with touchscreen, because you are never forced to touch a touchscreen on a laptop. You are always free to use trackpad or mouse if you prefer.
     
  9. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #9
    I agree with Steve on that, too. There's nothing I need or want a stylus for that I can't do better with a computer and trackpad. I don't even use a mouse anymore. YMMV
     
  10. SDColorado Contributor

    SDColorado

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    #10
    I don’t disagree for general input, but for artists use for coloring, sketches, drawing, etc. and for note taking I think he was wrong. Finger is to blunt and hard to control pressure and angle
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #11
    I see how artists can make use of a pencil, but I can type much faster than trying to take notes with a pencil, and recording is even faster. In many ways, other than for artistic uses, a stylus seems to be to be a major step backwards in productivity, since it's making advanced technology imitate more primitive technology. I thought the goal was to make us more efficient, not less. Next thing will probably be faxing or telegraph apps for our phones. Just my 2 cents worth.
     
  12. SDColorado Contributor

    SDColorado

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    #12
    I suppose the main takeaway on the "Steve said" stuff is that Steve is gone and whatever Steve said in the past has little influence on what Apple does in the future :)
     
  13. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #13
    I get a different takeaway from this thread. Certainly, Steve has little or no influence on Apple's future, and I only agree with things he said when he happens to agree with me. There's plenty I disagree with him about.

    For me, the takeaway is that some companies will at time act like they believe that just because you can do something with technology, you should. While a touchscreen notebook might fill a particular need for a particular group of people, for the most part, it's a very bad idea. In the same way, a stylus may serve a niche need well, but it's not practical or productive for the vast majority of users.
     
  14. SDColorado Contributor

    SDColorado

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    #14
    I guess I just don't see the harm in offering a choice. Some manufacturers offer both touch and non-touch models of the same laptop. But even models that don't offer a choice, they never come with a requirement to use touch/pen if the customer has no need to use either. You could buy a Lenovo X1 Extreme and never touch the screen if you never felt the need to, but the option is there for the particular group of people who do.

    For me, I personally feel the TouchBar falls into that category of "some companies will at time act like they believe that just because you can do something with technology, you should." But unlike TouchScreen, you have no choice but to use it, since it came at the expense of physical keys and no option was given to order without. I wouldn't have one if the option was given to order with TouchBar or physical keys.
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #15
    I agree with the idea of offering a choice, as long as it's a choice of which non-mainstream tech to buy, and not merely a choice to use or not. I don't agree with the idea of adding a touchscreen, touch bar, stylus, etc. as a standard feature, forcing people to buy the new tech, even if they don't need it, then telling them that they don't have to use it if they elect not to. As long as the decision can be made in the purchase process, I'm all for offering options.
     
  16. SDColorado Contributor

    SDColorado

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    #16
    The option for touchscreen doesn't bother me so much because you never have to use it. I feel it is kind of like the infotainment system in my car. I have the option to touch the screen, use the steering wheel controls, use voice or any combination of the three. The ones I don't wish to use I can simply ignore, even if they are there.

    But I do understand where you are coming from and just being able to CTO with what you want is always good.

    I would have loved to have been able to order my new MBP with physical function keys, rather than the TouchBar, but it wasn't an option.
     
  17. Project Alice macrumors 6502

    Project Alice

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