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PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
My father is getting up in age, had some illnesses.

His current issue is difficulty breathing and tiredness.

Last few months he is becoming very passive, wont do anything unless someone orders him to (some short term memory loss).

I was thinking the AW could monitor is activity level and encourage him to move around some more.
Also monitor his pulse (wish it could do SPO2 too, he needs that)

Is there any apps that will help too?

Thanks all.

(Like to change title to Monitoring elderly parents with Apple Watch)
 

Jessem1133

macrumors 6502
Sep 12, 2014
368
233
First question I would ask would be would be be able to use the watch? He would need to:
Put it on first thing in the morning.
Take it off before bed.
Charge it every single night.
Comprehend the info coming off a very small screen.

I don't think most people over 70 years old or so would be able to benefit from the Apple Watch unless they were really into it.
But that's just my opinion.
 

jasie02

macrumors 6502a
Sep 18, 2014
777
243
I don't think most people over 70 years old or so would be able to benefit from the Apple Watch unless they were really into it.
But that's just my opinion.

Not sure it is right to generalize older age people are not capacity of using current technology. I will say if anything people above 70 are using more technology then yesteryear. Both my parent are close to or above 70, and both use iPhone, iPad, Mac very well.
If you don't believe it, spent some time volunteer in senior home, get to know them, and judge with your eye and your own living experience with them.
 

nicho

macrumors 601
Feb 15, 2008
4,216
3,210
Oh good grief. o_O You might adjust that opinion when you are 70.

some of the problems he's referring to probably won't exist by the time he's 70. i'm sure a good new battery technology will have come along by then...
 

PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
First question I would ask would be would be be able to use the watch? He would need to:
Put it on first thing in the morning.
Take it off before bed.
Charge it every single night.
Comprehend the info coming off a very small screen.

I don't think most people over 70 years old or so would be able to benefit from the Apple Watch unless they were really into it.
But that's just my opinion.

Valid points..
He does ware a watch, but remembering to charge when needed...I think he will.
He does not need to know how to use it, its mainly for me (and doctor).

Last point, both my parents are over 80 and can use iPad, my mom is very big into it.
Mom told me she wanted iPad when she was 77, and loves it (returned favor and got me one next year)
 

PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
I watched my grandmother try and use an iPhone for a week. She went back to her old Nokia. I wouldn't bother giving her an Apple Watch.

My uncle (moms younger brother. 74?) is a technophobe, it was years before he would even think of getting a cell phone (did not even have land line)
Last year set up and gave him old iPhone 4, mom and me spent time how to use iOS and phone.
He surprised us he actually tried to use it (forgot most of its operation).
He was back this year and had more progress on teaching him how to use it. Has some services issues, but uses it from time to time, so there is progress!

In short, with old folks just takes much more time, weeks.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,757
15,253
Jacksonville, Florida
Nothing will replace someone making at least a daily visit to your Dad to make sure he is OK. I would rather see you get him one of the pendants that is monitored so if he falls or presses a button help will be on the way and you get notified.

The Apple watch would be a very poor substitute for this. What will the Apple watch do if he has a heart attack or stroke and is unconscious . . . getting that hourly "time to get up" is not going to do anything!
 

convergent

macrumors 68040
May 6, 2008
3,034
3,082
Oh good grief. o_O You might adjust that opinion when you are 70.

My issue is not with your grandmother, but with the generalization of "most people over 70." :)

Lighten up. The comment is legitimate given the OP's description of the person. People over 70 now likely haven't had as much experience with such things, vs. what your or I will when we get that age. I guess I'll take that back and speak for myself. Sure there are people that are over 70 and tech savvy, but given the description I don't think this is one of them.

Everyone is so sensitive and politically correct to make it impossible to have a reasonable conversation for fear of offending someone.

With regard to the original question, I would ask is this person already savvy with an iPhone. If not, I would never in a million years give them an Apple Watch. The AW adds a whole layer of complexity, and he would have to be dealing with both an iPhone and the AW on a daily basis. I think this would be a disaster.
 

PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
Nothing will replace someone making at least a daily visit to your Dad to make sure he is OK. I would rather see you get him one of the pendants that is monitored so if he falls or presses a button help will be on the way and you get notified.

The Apple watch would be a very poor substitute for this. What will the Apple watch do if he has a heart attack or stroke and is unconscious . . . getting that hourly "time to get up" is not going to do anything!

He already has this.
Mom too.


I spend as much time as I can, same with my mom, but obviously cannot do 24/7.
AW is to fill in some of the time I cant.
 

PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
With regard to the original question, I would ask is this person already savvy with an iPhone. If not, I would never in a million years give them an Apple Watch. The AW adds a whole layer of complexity, and he would have to be dealing with both an iPhone and the AW on a daily basis. I think this would be a disaster.

I am not asking him to do all this.

I will do the setup and such. It will help me better monitor his activity and encourage him to move around more.

It may possibly get him something that will interest him.
 

convergent

macrumors 68040
May 6, 2008
3,034
3,082
I am not asking him to do all this.

I will do the setup and such. It will help me better monitor his activity and encourage him to move around more.

It may possibly get him something that will interest him.

Sounds like you've already figured it out.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,757
15,253
Jacksonville, Florida
He already has this.
Mom too.


I spend as much time as I can, same with my mom, but obviously cannot do 24/7.
AW is to fill in some of the time I cant.

I understand you situation as I just lost my Mom. I was lucky and was able to get her to move in so we could watch her. It is a tough time with hard choices most of us have to face sooner or later.
 

PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
I understand you situation as I just lost my Mom. I was lucky and was able to get her to move in so we could watch her. It is a tough time with hard choices most of us have to face sooner or later.

My condolences, but it sounds like it was not to terrible for you.

Ended up getting FitBit ChargeHR, seeing how it will work out.
 

nightcap965

macrumors 6502a
Feb 11, 2004
726
863
Cape Cod
The Apple Watch is good for getting you up and moving about. Both the Activity app and the free Lark app do this. (I had to disable the Lark app after foot surgery because it kept telling me how tired my chair was getting and that I really should take a walk. Believe me, I'd love nothing better.)

I'm waiting for someone to do a heart app. I have a-fib, and don't always notice when I'm not in sinus rhythm. It strikes me that this is something the current WatchOS could handle, since it checks my pulse several times an hour. As of right now, there are no alerts.

According to what I've read, the current watch also has the capability to measure oxygen saturation, but Apple hasn't implemeted the software yet.

So, all in all, it's not the best choice to get an elderly person up and moving and ensure that he's breathing deeply enough. Maybe the next release.
 

PracticalMac

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Jan 22, 2009
2,857
5,242
Houston, TX
The Apple Watch is good for getting you up and moving about. Both the Activity app and the free Lark app do this. (I had to disable the Lark app after foot surgery because it kept telling me how tired my chair was getting and that I really should take a walk. Believe me, I'd love nothing better.)

I'm waiting for someone to do a heart app. I have a-fib, and don't always notice when I'm not in sinus rhythm. It strikes me that this is something the current WatchOS could handle, since it checks my pulse several times an hour. As of right now, there are no alerts.

According to what I've read, the current watch also has the capability to measure oxygen saturation, but Apple hasn't implemeted the software yet.

So, all in all, it's not the best choice to get an elderly person up and moving and ensure that he's breathing deeply enough. Maybe the next release.

ChargeHR has vibratory alert, like AW.

And I think FDA is preventing what you ask because of onerous reliability and reporting standards.
Possibly with lack of SPo2 in AW.

Something smells in all of this.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,757
15,253
Jacksonville, Florida
My condolences, but it sounds like it was not to terrible for you.

Ended up getting FitBit ChargeHR, seeing how it will work out.

Christmas and the holidays are not what they used to be, but then what is like it used to be. Thanks for your thoughts.

I am wearing my Charge HR right now. For the size is does the most. The Surge is way too big and the Charge HR is just right.
 
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