iPhone XR A11 / A12 Performance Controller Hardware Bug ...


Nicky84

macrumors newbie
Oct 17, 2018
18
4
Is this related to the notorious "momentary stuttering after inactivity" issue , present in "almost" all XS and XR devices?
 

cableguy84

macrumors 65816
Sep 7, 2015
1,377
1,919
Nearly 2 years since release of a11 bionic, and only now we are finding out it has a serious flaw? Yea seems plausible.
 

Cosmosent

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 20, 2016
920
956
La Jolla, CA
Still you haven’t actually described the bug or how to reproduce it.
We encourage you, & really everyone, to visit the A11/A12 Bug Fix option (& description) in the Photosets section of your Settings app, which you can access via the Main Menu INSIDE Photosets (via the Main View, NOT inside the Camera's UI).

This is related to the Performance Controller Bug that we first Discovered on October 27th of last year, & which we've been describing on our website & elsewhere the past week or so.

And very specifically, if Apple is UN-able OR UN-willing to Fix It, "we predict" two things will occur:

First, Apple's Market Cap is going to plunge by $100B USD or so !

Second, it will result in the first-ever iPhone Recall !

We've said it before, we'll say it again, a 2016 iPhone 7+ should NOT be able to run circles around a 2018 iPhone XR !

But that is precisely what is happening.

If you want to know Two Key Reasons why Apple will NOT currently promote Photosets, you've got it Right There

NO OTHER company (in the mobile industry) has ever Discovered something quite so Significant !

We refer to it as a "Cover Up" by Apple !

What Apple's Upper Mgmt fails to realize is that Cover Ups ALWAYS get people in trouble !

Once Apple's Board gets wind of this, Heads Will Roll !

-----

For those of you who are UN-aware, the Performance Controller is the Processor Scheduler INSIDE Apple's A-series processors ... they used to have a simplified & streamlined design that worked EXTREMELY well ... the last two iterations of the their A-series processors, the A11 & A12, have included Fancier & Fancier designs, that they apparently did NOT test well enough BEFORE committing to Silicon.

NONE of the Synthetic Benchmarks used in the mobile industry have discovered the issue !

ONLY Real World Applications are likely to ! ... Photosets was apparently the first, & still ONLY ONE to do so !

It is a very BIG deal !
 

Significant1

macrumors 6502a
Dec 20, 2014
706
210
What a bunch of drama. Cut to the chase and tell what the problem is, instead of doing speculation about market cap and iPhone recall. Sound more like an effort to stir up an rumor and do stock manipulation than a real issue.
 

sirghost

macrumors member
Jun 22, 2014
63
75
BREAKING NEWS: 6:30 PM (La Jolla, CA-time) Tuesday, June 18th

FYI, we've decided to File an "Official" Bug Report with Apple, on what we believe to an Extremely Serious Hardware Bug in "at least" the A12 processor, & affecting "at least" the iPhone XR.

Specifically, we believe Apple broke the Performance Controller design (in their A-series processors) when they transitioned from (probably) a Simple & Straight-forward design in the A10 (which enables Photosets to run like a 2019 Porsche GT4 on an iPhone 7+ !), to successively "Fancier" designs in the A11 & A12 (which reduces Photosets' performance capability on newer iPhones & iPads).

Very specifically, this is a Performance-crippling Hardware Bug that we are describing !

This is something that we first discovered on October 27th of last year, the first day we began testing our (first) iPhone XR, & have repeatedly (since then) tried to get the word out to Apple.

Our goal now is to put ALOT of (public) visibility on what we believe to be an Extremely Serious Hardware Bug.

Photosets has Secret Sauce Code in-place (in two different places) that reduces the impact of the Bug as much as possible.

Because we believe the Bug affects ALL Apple mobile devices with either an A11 OR A12 processor, Photosets has the Fixes "applied" to ALL such relevant iPhones & iPads.

-----

This topic should become Common Knowledge (across the internet) within just 1-2 weeks from now !

Drama queen much?
 

akash.nu

macrumors 604
May 26, 2016
7,341
8,257
We encourage you, & really everyone, to visit the A11/A12 Bug Fix option (& description) in the Photosets section of your Settings app, which you can access via the Main Menu INSIDE Photosets (via the Main View, NOT inside the Camera's UI).

This is related to the Performance Controller Bug that we first Discovered on October 27th of last year, & which we've been describing on our website & elsewhere the past week or so.

And very specifically, if Apple is UN-able OR UN-willing to Fix It, "we predict" two things will occur:

First, Apple's Market Cap is going to plunge by $100B USD or so !

Second, it will result in the first-ever iPhone Recall !

We've said it before, we'll say it again, a 2016 iPhone 7+ should NOT be able to run circles around a 2018 iPhone XR !

But that is precisely what is happening.

If you want to know Two Key Reasons why Apple will NOT currently promote Photosets, you've got it Right There

NO OTHER company (in the mobile industry) has ever Discovered something quite so Significant !

We refer to it as a "Cover Up" by Apple !

What Apple's Upper Mgmt fails to realize is that Cover Ups ALWAYS get people in trouble !

Once Apple's Board gets wind of this, Heads Will Roll !

-----

For those of you who are UN-aware, the Performance Controller is the Processor Scheduler INSIDE Apple's A-series processors ... they used to have a simplified & streamlined design that worked EXTREMELY well ... the last two iterations of the their A-series processors, the A11 & A12, have included Fancier & Fancier designs, that they apparently did NOT test well enough BEFORE committing to Silicon.

NONE of the Synthetic Benchmarks used in the mobile industry have discovered the issue !

ONLY Real World Applications are likely to ! ... Photosets was apparently the first, & still ONLY ONE to do so !

It is a very BIG deal !
Again, who the hell is WE?!

Edit - I see, looking at your older posts, it seems to me that you’re trying to promote your app by scaremongering.

Would it be better if you just described what your app is all about?! Some of us might just be interested anyway.
 
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I7guy

macrumors Core
Nov 30, 2013
20,380
8,209
Gotta be in it to win it
We encourage you, & really everyone, to visit the A11/A12 Bug Fix option (& description) in the Photosets section of your Settings app, which you can access via the Main Menu INSIDE Photosets (via the Main View, NOT inside the Camera's UI).

This is related to the Performance Controller Bug that we first Discovered on October 27th of last year, & which we've been describing on our website & elsewhere the past week or so.

And very specifically, if Apple is UN-able OR UN-willing to Fix It, "we predict" two things will occur:

First, Apple's Market Cap is going to plunge by $100B USD or so !

Second, it will result in the first-ever iPhone Recall !

We've said it before, we'll say it again, a 2016 iPhone 7+ should NOT be able to run circles around a 2018 iPhone XR !

But that is precisely what is happening.

If you want to know Two Key Reasons why Apple will NOT currently promote Photosets, you've got it Right There

NO OTHER company (in the mobile industry) has ever Discovered something quite so Significant !

We refer to it as a "Cover Up" by Apple !

What Apple's Upper Mgmt fails to realize is that Cover Ups ALWAYS get people in trouble !

Once Apple's Board gets wind of this, Heads Will Roll !

-----

For those of you who are UN-aware, the Performance Controller is the Processor Scheduler INSIDE Apple's A-series processors ... they used to have a simplified & streamlined design that worked EXTREMELY well ... the last two iterations of the their A-series processors, the A11 & A12, have included Fancier & Fancier designs, that they apparently did NOT test well enough BEFORE committing to Silicon.

NONE of the Synthetic Benchmarks used in the mobile industry have discovered the issue !

ONLY Real World Applications are likely to ! ... Photosets was apparently the first, & still ONLY ONE to do so !

It is a very BIG deal !
Maybe the synthetic benchmarks haven’t discovered an issue because there is no issue to discover.
 
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Feenician

macrumors 603
Jun 13, 2016
5,180
4,788
"Our software isn't optimized properly and rather than fix it we'll make vague assertions of hardware issues"
 

Puonti

macrumors 6502a
Mar 14, 2011
788
317
Unnamed Cosmosent representative,

As an outsider looking in I have to note that you're seriously hampering your efforts with your communication style and strategy on the App Store, your website and elsewhere. If your financials allow it I recommend you hire someone with experience in tech copywriting and if possible, public relations and social media, to be your company's voice. If you believe you already have that position covered, I'm respectfully telling you that they're either not up to the task, or someone with insufficient experience in this discipline is micromanaging them with unfortunate results.

If your current communication strategy is in line with your public image playbook, I recommend you rewrite the playbook. Your communication doesn't have to be stuffy corpspeak, but however you have internally described your current style ('approachable', 'accessible', 'down-to-earth', etc) it's coming off as confused and juvenile. Some examples of this follow.


On the style front, quotation marks are commonly used to quote something or to highlight jargon. If it's not immediately obvious that they're being used in that context, then – especially on the internet – they're easily taken in an ironic or mocking capacity. You don't want to use them the way you're using them:

...we've decided to file an "official" bug report... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "I despise this method of solving problems and would rather just complain on the internet"

...bug in "at least" the A12 processor... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "I don't know how quotation marks work"

...Photosets has the fixes "applied"... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "there isn't an actual fix, I'm just saying there is"

Cosmosent "Company" (source: your website)
Reads as: "this isn't a real company"

..."we predict" two things will occur... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "I'm just pulling this stuff out of my backside"


Likewise, in the English language first letter capitalization is most commonly used with proper nouns, at the beginning of a sentence and as styling in headlines. Capitalizing first letters willy-nilly comes off as uneducated, which is especially problematic when you are communicating as a business entity:

...we've decided to File an "Official" Bug Report... (source: this thread)

...Simple & Straight-forward... (source: this thread)

...believe to be an Extremely Serious Hardware Bug. (source: this thread)

...become Common Knowledge... (source: this thread)

...Two Key Reasons... (source: this thread)


And finally, center-alignment is commonly used to make short pieces of text more prominent within a contained layout, for instance in business cards or restaurant menus. When applied to longer text such as your company's entire website it not only comes off as amateurish but also makes it more difficult to read and comprehend the content.


On the strategy front I see several problems as well:

1) You refer to yourself in the plural on a discussion forum, where the expectation is that everyone is an individual even if they're using a nickname. It's possible your intention is to lend credibility to your business by referring to "us" and "our", but since your website offers no information on any individuals working for Cosmosent in any capacity – including yourself – you come off instead as putting legal and social distance between yourself and the company. Even if your concern is for employee privacy, at the very least the company's founder(s) should be listed and named

Presently the message you and your website are sending is that nobody is proud to be associated with the company and fears their future employment opportunities might be negatively impacted if they are found to have worked there. It's an unfortunate situation if true, but even if it isn't this perception undermines your credibility considerably

2) Rather than highlighting on your website satisfied customer testimonials (which, if they exist, you have access to as a developer regardless of App Store's algorithms) and glowing third-party reviews extolling the app's performance (which, if they exist, the reviewers will have brought to your attention), you're suggesting a link between publicizing your uncorroborated discoveries and the lack of promotion for your software:

"Please do NOT judge it by its lack of success in the iOS App Store ... If is FAR SUPERIOR to many apps that Apple has recommended in its iOS App Store" (source: your website)

"If you want to know Two Key Reasons why Apple will NOT currently promote Photosets, you've got it Right There" (source: your website)

Blaming others is a tactic commonly used by people who are unable to change with the times, or who do not have the necessary skills for a given task to begin with. Even if neither applies to you, this strategy is causing your business to be associated with these types of people

3) Your software was not created to allow your customers to work around a flaw or limitation in other software or hardware (the excellent Audio Hijack by Rogue Amoeba comes to mind), yet you are making the fact that your software works around such a perceived flaw a central element in your present PR strategy. This is problematic because if the flaw you highlight is found out to be imaginary, whatever credibility you might have had previously is gone (making it tempting to operate anonymously – see problem #1)

Your situation is no better if the flaw is verified and acknowledged. If it's not fixed by Apple, then other developers affected by it will implement their own workarounds and you no longer have an edge, real or imagined. In that case – and in the case that Apple does fix it – your software needs to once more appeal to customers solely on the execution of its primary purpose. Judging by what you're publicizing here, on your website and on the App Store, it's not doing great on its own merits

4) Finally, to expand on this flaw you purport to have discovered, you are concentrating on telling rather than showing. Traditionally when a flaw is discovered it is throroughly analyzed and documented, in order to fix it or work around it. You say you have implemented workarounds in your software, yet you have not publicized any proper data or analysis of the problem for other developers and researchers to verify

Instead you are spreading fear, uncertainty and doubt by suggesting Apple's market cap will plummet and there will be a hardware recall (source: your website) and grandstanding by falsely suggesting that no other company in the mobile industry has ever discovered something quite so significant (source: your website). I would suggest that the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities alone were far more significant than this could be. Notably their discovery was not used by a developer to explain away their poor App Store performance
 

steve23094

macrumors 68030
Apr 23, 2013
2,611
1,330
Unnamed Cosmosent representative,

As an outsider looking in I have to note that you're seriously hampering your efforts with your communication style and strategy on the App Store, your website and elsewhere. If your financials allow it I recommend you hire someone with experience in tech copywriting and if possible, public relations and social media, to be your company's voice. If you believe you already have that position covered, I'm respectfully telling you that they're either not up to the task, or someone with insufficient experience in this discipline is micromanaging them with unfortunate results.

If your current communication strategy is in line with your public image playbook, I recommend you rewrite the playbook. Your communication doesn't have to be stuffy corpspeak, but however you have internally described your current style ('approachable', 'accessible', 'down-to-earth', etc) it's coming off as confused and juvenile. Some examples of this follow.


On the style front, quotation marks are commonly used to quote something or to highlight jargon. If it's not immediately obvious that they're being used in that context, then – especially on the internet – they're easily taken in an ironic or mocking capacity. You don't want to use them the way you're using them:

...we've decided to file an "official" bug report... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "I despise this method of solving problems and would rather just complain on the internet"

...bug in "at least" the A12 processor... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "I don't know how quotation marks work"

...Photosets has the fixes "applied"... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "there isn't an actual fix, I'm just saying there is"

Cosmosent "Company" (source: your website)
Reads as: "this isn't a real company"

..."we predict" two things will occur... (source: this thread)
Reads as: "I'm just pulling this stuff out of my backside"


Likewise, in the English language first letter capitalization is most commonly used with proper nouns, at the beginning of a sentence and as styling in headlines. Capitalizing first letters willy-nilly comes off as uneducated, which is especially problematic when you are communicating as a business entity:

...we've decided to File an "Official" Bug Report... (source: this thread)

...Simple & Straight-forward... (source: this thread)

...believe to be an Extremely Serious Hardware Bug. (source: this thread)

...become Common Knowledge... (source: this thread)

...Two Key Reasons... (source: this thread)


And finally, center-alignment is commonly used to make short pieces of text more prominent within a contained layout, for instance in business cards or restaurant menus. When applied to longer text such as your company's entire website it not only comes off as amateurish but also makes it more difficult to read and comprehend the content.


On the strategy front I see several problems as well:

1) You refer to yourself in the plural on a discussion forum, where the expectation is that everyone is an individual even if they're using a nickname. It's possible your intention is to lend credibility to your business by referring to "us" and "our", but since your website offers no information on any individuals working for Cosmosent in any capacity – including yourself – you come off instead as putting legal and social distance between yourself and the company. Even if your concern is for employee privacy, at the very least the company's founder(s) should be listed and named

Presently the message you and your website are sending is that nobody is proud to be associated with the company and fears their future employment opportunities might be negatively impacted if they are found to have worked there. It's an unfortunate situation if true, but even if it isn't this perception undermines your credibility considerably

2) Rather than highlighting on your website satisfied customer testimonials (which, if they exist, you have access to as a developer regardless of App Store's algorithms) and glowing third-party reviews extolling the app's performance (which, if they exist, the reviewers will have brought to your attention), you're suggesting a link between publicizing your uncorroborated discoveries and the lack of promotion for your software:

"Please do NOT judge it by its lack of success in the iOS App Store ... If is FAR SUPERIOR to many apps that Apple has recommended in its iOS App Store" (source: your website)

"If you want to know Two Key Reasons why Apple will NOT currently promote Photosets, you've got it Right There" (source: your website)

Blaming others is a tactic commonly used by people who are unable to change with the times, or who do not have the necessary skills for a given task to begin with. Even if neither applies to you, this strategy is causing your business to be associated with these types of people

3) Your software was not created to allow your customers to work around a flaw or limitation in other software or hardware (the excellent Audio Hijack by Rogue Amoeba comes to mind), yet you are making the fact that your software works around such a perceived flaw a central element in your present PR strategy. This is problematic because if the flaw you highlight is found out to be imaginary, whatever credibility you might have had previously is gone (making it tempting to operate anonymously – see problem #1)

Your situation is no better if the flaw is verified and acknowledged. If it's not fixed by Apple, then other developers affected by it will implement their own workarounds and you no longer have an edge, real or imagined. In that case – and in the case that Apple does fix it – your software needs to once more appeal to customers solely on the execution of its primary purpose. Judging by what you're publicizing here, on your website and on the App Store, it's not doing great on its own merits

4) Finally, to expand on this flaw you purport to have discovered, you are concentrating on telling rather than showing. Traditionally when a flaw is discovered it is throroughly analyzed and documented, in order to fix it or work around it. You say you have implemented workarounds in your software, yet you have not publicized any proper data or analysis of the problem for other developers and researchers to verify

Instead you are spreading fear, uncertainty and doubt by suggesting Apple's market cap will plummet and there will be a hardware recall (source: your website) and grandstanding by falsely suggesting that no other company in the mobile industry has ever discovered something quite so significant (source: your website). I would suggest that the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities alone were far more significant than this could be. Notably their discovery was not used by a developer to explain away their poor App Store performance
Ha ha! Burn.
 

New_Mac_Smell

macrumors 68000
Oct 17, 2016
1,914
1,491
Shanghai
@Puonti I've rarely seen such balanced and lengthly constructive criticism provided to someone else on a forum, you've spent a lot of time writing that one and one would hope the OP takes the advice.

Personally the curiosity made me visit the website, and it is for lack of a "better" word, amazing... To my eyes, it's a single person company consisting entirely of one developer (Every person has the same qualification from the same university), there's clearly no designer or anyone capable of human contact. However there's bugs all over that website, the header links change on different pages for a start, which is rather sloppy for a developer "company".

I think that website is a fantastic resource that people can study for how not to promote and market your product. It looks like a pre-flash 90s website for a start, but the copy and everything @Puonti mentioned is very poignant.

I know developers, they can code and make something technically great - but looks horrendous and is barely functional in a design / UX perspective. Opposite thing goes for designers, it may look great but it'll be a buggy mess. These two disciplines need each other to actually build something.
 

Webster's Mac

macrumors regular
Dec 18, 2016
236
186
Yes... the 95% customer satisfaction rate is going to cause Apple to PLUNGE BY BILLIONS...

Things like this can be addressed in software updates...if iOS 13 on my SE is any indication, my XR will become much faster in the fall.