About Archiving Projects

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by Esrhan, Oct 4, 2009.

  1. Esrhan macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    #1
    Hello all,

    Before starting I feel inclined to say that I did in-fact use the search function, but did not find what I was looking for. What I humbly request is some general advice on the archiving methods I am thinking for my small editing business. Here goes.

    My first scenario is to use a plain external RAID-hard drive that mirrors all the data I copy on it and has hot-swappable hard drives. I am left wondering if I only need one unit of these devices, for example the LaCie 2big Quadra, and as it fulls up, can I take out both hard drives, label and number them, insert a new pair and store away the first pair so I can insert them at a later date into the same device to access them? My worry is this does not work and the device has to format both hard drives, so it will not recognize them when inserted as they originally were. Thus I am left with two hard drives full of data which I can't access.

    My second scenario is to use the Drobo, insert 4 big hard drives, fill it up to its fullest and then store the unit away and buy a new one. OR if I can again take out the hard drives, number them and later insert them in the same manner as I originally had them. My worry again is that the device won't recognize the hard drives and will want to format them to gain access.

    I am slightly titled towards buying a Drobo, as it is not restricted on what kind of hard drives you feed it. The LaCie for example has its own hot-swappable drives with special railings, so it is not as flexible but slightly cheaper option.

    My projects are usually under 100GB (only one is currently over 500GB), I use Final Cut Studio for pretty much everything and I really have to include the whole capture scratch folder to go with the archiving as I currently have no fast access to a deck to batch capture the footage again.

    Thanks in advance for the feedback, and I am more than happy to take suggestions or hear what others use as their archiving method.
     
  2. tri3limited macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Location:
    London
    #2
    Once a project is complete, get the client to sign it off and then used the media manager function in Final Cut to archive the whole project. This will massively reduce the size of the project and allow you to move it easily to where ever you want.

    Once your drive fills up you can then remove the project and keep the final QTs for showreels and reference.

    Do please remember that ALL mechanical storage solutions WILL fail and backup after backup is your only option. If you have access, it would be better to output to tape (relevant tape only) as the backup and just keep hold of the EDL.
     
  3. Esrhan thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    #3
    I forgot to mention that I have a lot of other project related files to backup as well, not just editing related. Audio files, images, logos, Motion projects, Color projects, DVD Studio Pro projects and the like all need to go into the same place and so tape doesn't suit my needs at all.

    I assume having two separate hard drives failing at the same time is rare enough to function as a safe enough option for my needs. I haven't yet managed to break or witness a single hard drive fail, so I am quite confident in avoiding a double whammy. Of course a server based backup to go along with this would be most appropriate.

    I would still like an answer to how external RAID hard drive devices react when inserted with an "older" pair/set of hard drives. I could go and test this myself, but I'd like to know before investing on anything.
     
  4. TheStrudel macrumors 65816

    TheStrudel

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    #4
    I've found that projects in total under 25 GB (or 50 GB, though more expensive) can be successfully archived to Blu-ray disc. I just bring it up as another alternative. It is expensive, but drives have dropped to around $140 for burners and discs to around $2 each.
     
  5. tri3limited macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Location:
    London
    #5
    I have to admit I have considered Blu-ray archiving but still believe the format will become redundant so quickly that it'll never catch on to a stage where the discs become DVD cheap.

    In the UK we still haven't even switched over to digital yet, that's before you realise we only have about 15 HD channels, all subscription based, and no one I know owns a 1080p TV... Just those 1366x768 unmapped things.
     
  6. TheStrudel macrumors 65816

    TheStrudel

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    #6
    Actually, it's happening faster than you think. The prices never dropped this fast on DVDs. $2.05 per disc is very cheap, when you consider that Dual Layer DVDs are still selling at around $0.80 per disc and that BDs are very young as a format.
     

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