Access mac from the internet

Discussion in 'macOS' started by MacDonaldsd, Apr 18, 2007.

  1. MacDonaldsd macrumors 65816

    MacDonaldsd

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    London , UK
    #1
  2. FJ218700 macrumors 68000

    FJ218700

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    Blue Dot, Red State
  3. MacDonaldsd thread starter macrumors 65816

    MacDonaldsd

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    #3
    No its dynamic, my above post is meant to solve this. Checks current IP address in the background and sends it to the DNS server.
     
  4. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

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    Apr 8, 2004
    #4
    What does "doesn't work" mean precisely? Can you describe your setup? Do you have DSL? Do you have a router? If you have a router are you forwarding to the correct port on your Mac? Does your ISP block access to port 80? Have you turned on web access on your Mac?
     
  5. MacDonaldsd thread starter macrumors 65816

    MacDonaldsd

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    #5
    By doesn't work I mean when I type in the url to access my mac it doesn't do anything, just says the server has stopped responding.

    I access the internet using DSL and my router is the new airport extreme.

    How would I check what port it is going to ?
     
  6. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

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    Apr 8, 2004
    #6
    That usually means the port isn't open.

    You will need to make sure the router is forwarding requests to port 80 to your Mac behind the router. I don't have an AEB but generally, there's a port forwarding option in the router settings. On my Netgear router, I would set it up to forward requests on port 80 to my Mac's local IP address, which is 192.168.0.2 - your's would most likely be different.

    You also need to go into Preferences/Sharing and turn on Personal Web Sharing.

    Once you have that set up, try going to http://localhost/~<your username> on the mac you're trying to access and see if you get anything. If that works, then you know you have web access locally at least. Then before worrying about dynamic dns, find out your external IP address (google for "what is my IP address") and replace "localhost" with it in the url above.

    Did you set up dynamic dns on the router? Again, I don't know how this works on the AEB, but my Netgear has a dyndns section where I specify the dynamic dns server and the host name I'm using. The router keeps the IP address up to date in the dynamic dns server.

    This still assumes that your ISP will allow requests to port 80 through. Many ISPs (in the US anyway - I don't know about the UK) don't allow that because they want you to pay for the privilege of hosting your own server.

    Also, with web access, your folder needs to be under the Sites folder in your account.

    There's an alternative. Since you say you just want to access a folder, did you think about just setting up ssh access? Turn on remote login in Preferences/Sharing and set up port forwarding on port 22 to your Mac. Then you can ssh into your Mac and also use scp to get files from and save files to it. This is more secure, since if you have web access to a folder, everyone else in the world has (unless you set up access control in Apache ...)
     
  7. MacDonaldsd thread starter macrumors 65816

    MacDonaldsd

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    #7
    I think the problem is with the port as i can access it by typeing localhost into the URL bar.

    I couldn't use ssh via a web browser though could I ?
     
  8. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

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    #8
    No, but deciding whether to use web access or ssh depends on what you want to do. If you want to download/upload files, ssh/scp/sftp is much more secure. If you just want to view some information you don't care if seen by others, web access is fine.

    ssh/scp/sftp is available via the command line in *nix OSs like Linux, Solaris and OS X. It's also available on Windows with various downloads and GUI clients like putty and winscp.

    If you're connecting to a Mac from a Mac, and you're not comfortable with the Terminal, OS X doesn't come with a builtin GUI for ssh/scp/sftp, but Fugu works well enough. I prefer the terminal but I'm old-fashioned and have been working with *nix systems for 20 years.

    You'll still have to work out how to open port 22 on your router.
     
  9. nplima macrumors 6502a

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    UK
    #9
    hi


    I'm risking a public stoning here, but there's a software by ... microsoft... that does whet you need. and it's actually.. gasp... quite good.

    http://www.foldershare.com/
     
  10. daveL macrumors 68020

    daveL

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    #10
    But ... uh ... wouldn't that require ... gasp! ... Windows?

    Anyway, I wouldn't trust an on-line MS service to save my soul.
     
  11. plinden macrumors 68040

    plinden

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    Apr 8, 2004
    #11
    No, there's an OS X version. Anyway, it's a file synchronization app, and if you don't want to synchronize files, just access one now and then, it's probably not for you.

    Edit: actually, I read a bit more about this and it also seems to allow folder sharing without sync'ing, but you can do that anyway with what's already built in to OS X.

    No matter what the OP decides, web access, ssh or file synchronization, the issue he is facing is getting access to the Mac from outside his router, so he would still need to open the relevant port(s) on his router and forward them to the Mac.
     
  12. daveL macrumors 68020

    daveL

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    #12
    Yes, of course he'll need to port forward on the router. I use ssh for internet access, but I don't use the standard port number. I use an unprivileged port (> 1000) number from outside (-p argument to ssh) and have the router set to forward that port to the standard ssh port on my Mac. The standard ssh port has been the subject of some hacker attacks, so my ISP filters it.

    Could the OP use port 443 (https) to gain some security?

    Finally, there's a little app called "Transmit" that does file sync'ing / sharing for OS X. It's not free, however.
     
  13. MacDonaldsd thread starter macrumors 65816

    MacDonaldsd

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    London , UK
    #13
    The main reason I wanted to set this up was so I could work on my mac at home, and instead of having to move files to a usb pen/email to myself etc I could just download them from a browser.
     
  14. nplima macrumors 6502a

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    Apr 26, 2006
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    UK
    #14
    not only that but it also allows you to access your files using the www.foldershare.com service. it works through NAT and firewalls. a MS product that "just works". please see attached picture for more details :)
     

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