Activation Lock

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by pika2000, Jan 16, 2017.

  1. pika2000 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2007
    #1
    I want to understand better about Apple's activation lock. My understanding is, Apple is linking an iDevice with your iCloud account, so in the event the device is stolen/restored/reset, one has to verify the iCloud account first. It is enabled when Find my iPhone is enabled.

    Question, is this linked to the passcode?
    Scenario: An iDevice doesn't have a passcode, but find my iPhone is turned on. What is the ramifications if the device is stolen? Let's say two factor authentication is enabled on the iCloud account.
     
  2. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    At the iPhone hacks section.
    #2
    They can't remove the iCloud lock unless they know your Apple ID and password.
    Even if you don't have a passcode setup to input to get in the home screen they still cannot remove it.
    It has nothing to do with the iPhone passcode.
     
  3. Suckfest 9001 macrumors 6502a

    Suckfest 9001

    Joined:
    May 31, 2015
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    To disable Find My iPhone, you need to input the iCloud password. So if the thief knows the passcode, they'll be able to get into the phone and probably access personal information. But anything that requires entering iCloud credentials, including purchasing apps, disabling Find My iPhone, and doing a factory reset from the menu, won't be possible.

    Bonus points if you have two-factor authentication; if they happen to know your iCloud password (some people store passwords in the Notes app - please don't do this), they still won't be able to do anything because another one of your devices is going to ask you for confirmation.

    Basically the only way somebody can completely steal your phone and reset it as new with two-factor authentication is to:
    • Know your passcode/have a scanned fingerprint from you
    • Know your iCloud password
    • Possess two or more of your unlocked devices
    AKA they might as well just be you.
     
  4. 960design, Jan 16, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017

    960design macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Location:
    Destin, FL
    #4
    Nope.
    None at all. Without passcode, thief has instant access to your entire device, including turning off WiFi / cell. Which would prevent the iCloud lock you are frantically running to a computer to initiate.

    Thief then accesses prepared E-Bay account ( where they sold stuff to themselves to get a high rating over the last couple of months ) and takes pictures and videos of working iPad. Sell it to unlucky Ebayer, takes the money and runs. Ebay refunds money to you, closes thief's account, finds out thief has fake account info, making continued pursuit for $200 repayment not worth their time / additional money.
     
  5. pika2000 thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2007
    #5
    Alright, but the device itself is still unusable, am I correct?
    Will DFU mode override this?
     
  6. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    At the iPhone hacks section.
    #6
    Correct.
    Nothing can override the activation lock. No restore or DFU mode.
    Only the correct password or if Apple removes with with valid photo ID and proof of ownership.
     
  7. 960design macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Location:
    Destin, FL
    #7
    Not completely. The thief could play all of the games you have stored locally ( as long as they are not WKWebView based ), set alarms, create local notes, use pages to create local documents, and much more.

    DFU mode will not override activation lock, that would be a very poorly designed protection system.

    There are other ways: overflow activation lock bypass screen, social hack iCloud account, retrieve latest, encrypted, local backup from stolen device itself - reverse engineer, physically take apart device and clone memory allowing for brute force crack, and others. Truly depends on resources of thief.

    Best bet, use passcode and activation lock.
     
  8. Applejuiced macrumors Westmere

    Applejuiced

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    At the iPhone hacks section.
    #8
    Those are all great hypothesis if you have the resources of the CIA and millions of dollars to spend to bypass such security features.
    Love how you say there are other ways like its a walk in the park :)
     
  9. 960design macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Location:
    Destin, FL
    #9
    I have a great imagination...
     

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