Adding a second processor to a uni=processor Mac Pro?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by WardC, Jun 6, 2010.

  1. WardC macrumors 68030

    WardC

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #1
    Can it be done? Is there a second socket on the uni-processor Mac Pro model which will allow for the addition of a second processor to the board, to give a dual-processor machine? For instance, with the 3.33GHz Mac Pro -- could you add another identical 3.33GHz quad-core processor to a second socket?

    Please advise

    Thanks
     
  2. Marty Macfly macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    #2
    There is no second socket, a fact that could be found by looking at pictures of single socket Mac Pros.

    The processors and RAM are on a daughterboard, however, and while I have never heard of anyone doing so, it should be at least physically possible to swap daughterboards.
     
  3. WardC thread starter macrumors 68030

    WardC

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #3
    Well...

    I read another thread here:

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=414668

    Which says that there IS another CPU socket on the motherboard, and that you CAN indeed install a second processor on the Mac Pro, you just need a heatsink, the socket is already there.

    So I am getting conflicted reports. Anybody have the definitive answer?
     
  4. Salavat23 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    #4
    You could do it on the first two Mac Pros, but not on the latest one.
     
  5. WardC thread starter macrumors 68030

    WardC

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #5
    really??? That kinda sucks. I know Apple offers a 3.33GHz version of their single processor Mac Pro (currently) while their dual processor model only goes up to 2.93GHz. That's really why I asked. Just wondering if it would be possible to add another 3.33GHz processor to the model and make it the fastest Mac Pro around (until Monday or whenever the new ones are intro'd...LOL)
     
  6. Techhie macrumors 65816

    Techhie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Location:
    The hub of stupidity
    #6
    Not only has it been determined that it can't be done without the ol' daughterboard trick, but also that it is ridiculously expensive based on the price of the rare parts.
     
  7. Vylen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #7
    Well, even if there was a spare socket on the uni-MP, the 3.33 Ghz CPU is designed as uniprocessor. That is to say, there are processors out there designed specifically for single or dual configurations. So you can't stick two of the 3.33 Ghz CPU's into a dual socket motherboard.
     
  8. Techhie macrumors 65816

    Techhie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Location:
    The hub of stupidity
    #8
    Not true. That chip is a part of the Xeon lineup, meaning it has dual QPIs. There are a few eBay Mac Pros on sale right now using two of those chips.

    update: link ...expensive =)
     
  9. Vylen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #9
    Well, if you want to get detailed. The uni-MP of 2009 uses the Bloomfield CPU, which - once again - is designed for single socket boards. I was assuming you were asking to stick two of these into a dual socket board.

    However, there's nothing stopping you from putting two 3.33Ghz Gulftown (what's in the dual-MPs) CPU's into a dual socket board, cause that's what they're designed for.
     
  10. Techhie macrumors 65816

    Techhie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Location:
    The hub of stupidity
    #10
    The Mac Pros using two of the 3.33 GHz chips are equipped with two W5590 Gainestown chips, not Gulftown. Of course you couldn't use the single QPI chips, I skimmed through and thought the OP was referring to the DP config chips :p
     
  11. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #11
    Looking at your sig, it looks like you've an older model. Assuming this is the case, the '06 - '08 systems had 2x CPU sockets on the boards.

    The exact model will matter though, so you get the correct part. And as memntioned, it may not be cost effective (particularly if you buy new). You'd also need another cooler for it, which adds to the upgrade cost.

    So what is the exact model of MP you have?
     
  12. WardC thread starter macrumors 68030

    WardC

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Worth, TX
    #12
    I actually sold that Mac Pro in my sig, I am thinking about getting a new one. I might just get one of those custom dual 8 core 3.33GHz machines off eBay. This guy is adding the chips to the 8-core systems making them duals running at 3.33GHz. Pretty damn cool, but pretty damn expensive too.
     
  13. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #13
    Ah, OK.

    Then if you're going with a 2009 system, you need to order an Octad if you want the second processor (it's technically possible to do with a Quad model, but all the parts will make it unfeasible financially speaking).

    So get the second CPU when you buy (clock speed and source is up to you). ;)

    BTW, if it has to go back to Apple for repairs, you'd need the original processors (and any other equipment that's been upgraded from the system Apple originally sold). Add-ons are supposed to be removed before returning it to Apple for repair/replacement (system returned to original hardware prior to any work being performed). If you don't do this, there's a seriousl chance you're upgraded parts will disappear (others have had this happen).

    Just a warning to check into these details from the seller if you go that route.
     
  14. turugara macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    #14
    Like SSD's :(
     
  15. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #15
    Yep. But don't forget additional HDD's, RAM, PCIe cards, power supplies, adapters, cables that've been added,...

    BTW, did you lose an SSD in a repair?
     
  16. Techhie macrumors 65816

    Techhie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2008
    Location:
    The hub of stupidity
    #16
    Before visiting these forums, I would have questioned the legality of that... But now I know that Apple's legal terms are tighter than a grad student's budget.

    Shame really, considering that submitting a non-defaulted machine for repair is essentially taking a gamble on those parts.
     
  17. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #17
    If you look, there's a clause on it, so it seems they're covered in that respect. :eek: :rolleyes: :p
     

Share This Page