Adding external HD to TC: USB or Ethernet?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by Evangelion, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. Evangelion macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    #1
    I'm planning top get a Time Capsule, so I could get faster network with more range, in addition to built-in backups. But I still need a network-attached storage, and I would like to do that by simply plugging in an external HD to the Time Capsule. Now, USB would be an obvious choice. But for roughly the same amount of money I could get a external HD that has gigabit ethernet. Now, Gig-E should be faster than USB, so would it make sense to go that route, as opposed to simply getting a USB-HD? I trust that functionally there shouldn't be any differences between US and ethernet?
     
  2. jason999 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    #2
    Get an ext hdd with usb2 and ethernet built into the one case. Then you can choose to use usb2 or ethernet.

    I'd use usb2 over ethernet. Usb2 is faster.
     
  3. nagromme macrumors G5

    nagromme

    Joined:
    May 2, 2002
    #3
    Functionally the difference may be that with USB, you can also attach it directly to your computer and have functionality I don't think ethernet will give you--like all the features of Disk Utility, like formatting and partitioning and repairing.

    For instance, I connect my Time Capsule via ethernet to my Mac, and Disk Utility doesn't see it. If it were USB, it would be seen. An ethernet drive like you describe would be much like a Time Capsule itself in many ways.

    Regardless of speeds, I'd personally like the flexibility of USB--plus any other ports (ethernet, Firewire) that you can get cheaply :)
     
  4. Evangelion thread starter macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    #4
    I don't think that USB2 is faster than Gigabit Ethernet...
     
  5. oxfordguy macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Location:
    Oxford, England
    #5
    It isn't, in theory USB2 supports up to 480 Mbit/s, Gigabit ethernet supports up to 1000 Mbit/s, though real world performance may differ
     

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