Admin Account vs. Non-Admin account

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by agentphish, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. agentphish macrumors 65816

    agentphish

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    #1
    So we're gathering info on switching over in the design dept. where I work (I am basically heading this thing up because I've used Mac for a long time now) and I was wondering if there's some sort of comparison chart or other documentataion out there that shows what an Administrator account can do and access in OS X vs. what a non-administrator account can do and access in OS X?

    My concern is that we'll get them to approve these Macs and our IT dept will get their hands on them before we do (because apparently we're not intelligent enough to install software on a Mac, and I know they'll want to do EVERYTHING) and they will set up non-admin accounts for us on the machines, thus possibly crippling our ability to work in the most efficient way.

    I am worried about being able to tweak settings in System Preferences, installing free or open source utilities such as Linotype's Font ExplorerX for font management, Color management settings/calibrations, and managing things such as TimeMachine.

    I am just wondering what would be crippled since I've always had admin access on Macs that I've worked on.

    Thanks!
     
  2. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #2
    An admin account can make changes on a system level. A normal user account can't.

    Thats pretty much the only difference. This means any preference or anything outside of your home folder is off limits for changing if you're a normal user. You can still change things like your desktop image though, unless you're a limited user.
     
  3. AdeFowler macrumors 68020

    AdeFowler

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Location:
    England
    #3
    Why not set up a non-admin account on your own Mac and have a play?

    I run on a standard account and need to enter my admin password 2 or 3 times a week. It would be a serious PITA if I had to get someone in every time. How would switching to macs be any different to your existing set-up (Windows non-admin I guess)?
     
  4. agentphish thread starter macrumors 65816

    agentphish

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    #4
    yeah. we are non-admin windows users, but they have group policies and stuff set up so that we have a little more control I guess. Though, visually, within the OS there's things we can't change, like our taskbar is always locked, and can't be modified as far as placement of quicklaunch toolbar and stuff like that.

    We can not install applications....though I believe my system has somehow been left out of policy on that after a service call where I had them install an FTP client because I have managed to install just about anything I want ever since then :)

    there are other certain system settings and things in the control panel that are off limits as well.
     
  5. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #5
    Well the difference between the two account types between windows and mac is pretty significant. Many windows apps have to be run by an admin for some reason while on a mac it is pretty much business as usual (you can install certain apps, you just can't install them in the main application folder unless you have the admin password). You'll be able to play with your dock and stuff as long as you are a normal user and not a limited user. Limited users can be so limited that all they can do is surf the web or they can be just as open as a normal user.
     
  6. pulsewidth947 macrumors 65816

    pulsewidth947

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Location:
    squarefrog.co.uk
    #6
    If the apps are installed by dragging and dropping - any one can do that. Just drag it to your home folder rather than the Applications Folder.

    We have all our students using standard accounts, and once the apps have been installed you don't often have to authenticate yourself. We use Adobe Design Premium (Photoshop, In Design, Illustrator, etc) and we haven't had any real problems.
     
  7. photo-video macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2004
  8. agentphish thread starter macrumors 65816

    agentphish

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    #8
    Thank you for all the responses folks. I think this has helped.

    Zak
     

Share This Page