Admin User Account

Discussion in 'macOS' started by AndyMoore, May 20, 2009.

  1. AndyMoore macrumors 6502

    AndyMoore

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    #1
    My iMac (10.5.7) is currently set up with me as the Admin user. I know that this is not recommended but it's been like this for a while and I'm considering setting up an Admin user and dropping my account down to a standard account.

    Is this likely to cause me any problems with the applications that have been installed over the months or is there anything I need to watch out for when doing this?
     
  2. ziggyonice macrumors 68020

    ziggyonice

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Rural America
    #2
    Actually, I've never heard of it to be "not recommended" to have the Admin account also be your main. It's not a good idea to have the root user (or super user) be your main account, but that's completely different. Just about everyone I know uses the Admin account on their machine. Switching to a standard account will just make things more difficult for you each time you install software, etc.
     
  3. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
  4. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #4
    No-one runs as Admin on my Macs. It causes no problems whatsover and provided an extra layer of security from Trojans. I'd highly recommend it as would most security concious users/groups. For example: See Rule #1
     
  5. aicul macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Location:
    no cars, only boats
    #5
    I think it not useful to discuss whether it is or is not recommended to use your account as admin.

    However, often you do not need admin privileges for all of your day to day cores, so why take the risk?

    OSX is very well built, for example if you try to install software from a non-admin account it will immediately ask you for some admin username/password right then and there in your "non privileged" personal account.
     
  6. AndyMoore thread starter macrumors 6502

    AndyMoore

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    #6
    This is why I'm asking. I want to change how my accounts are set up (there's just me using it) but I don't want to change it to a more secure environment if in the process of doing it, it causes issues with OS X because applications have been installed over time when there's just been the one account.

    I'm fine with having an Admin account and my account as standard and I realise what it means in day to day use.
     
  7. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #7
    I'd say go for it: it works fine for me...
     
  8. AndyMoore thread starter macrumors 6502

    AndyMoore

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    #8
    I'm sure I read somewhere that the process of adding and Admin Account and downgrading your own account can cause permission problems in applications that have already been installed.

    If it doesn't then I'll do it.
     
  9. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #9
    It never has when I've done it. Did it mention any specific Applications. I think I had a small issue with an older version of Adobe CS where I had to run the applications as Admin once before I could use them as a non-Admin user but I can't remember any other issues.
     
  10. Jethryn Freyman macrumors 68020

    Jethryn Freyman

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    #10
    I tried it once but it was frustrating, since I do a lot of things that need admin/root access.

    As long as you know how to protects yourself against trojans (don't open apps you don't trust), it's fine.
     
  11. AndyMoore thread starter macrumors 6502

    AndyMoore

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    #11
    I went ahead and added an admin account last night and changed my personal account to a standard account. So far it doesn't seem to have had an adverse effect on anything I've used.
     

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