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Adobe today announced the launch of new updates for its Premiere Pro and After Effects Creative Cloud apps, which are designed for video editing professionals and graphic artists. This year's updates are focused on simplifying and streamlining streaming video workflows as people continue to work from home.

premiereproscenedit.jpg

A new Scene Edit Detection feature in Premiere Pro is aimed at providing editors a way to find cuts in previously edited video more quickly, using Adobe Sensei machine learning technology. Scene Edit Detection introduces cuts and markers that let effects be applied to individual shots so previously rendered content can be re-edited in a hassle-free way.

A Quick Export feature (available through the Premiere Pro public beta testing function), provides quick access to the most popular and frequently used export settings in Premiere Pro. The Quick Edit settings can be accessed from the header bar.

premiereproquickexport.jpg

HDR for Broadcasters is designed to let Premiere Pro users produce programming in Rec2100 HLG HDR with automatic color correction, HDR scope support, color space overrides for incorrect metadata, and full color management for Apple ProRes and Sony XAVC Intra formats.

ProRes multicam performance has been updated and can support 2x more streams, and faster effects scanning for VST3 and Audio Unit Plugins offer faster launch times for users who use third-party audio plugins.

As for After Effects, Adobe is introducing several new public beta features that are available to those running the beta version of the software.

3D Transform Gizmos guides for scale, position, and rotating layers so it's easier to tell how far a layer or object has been moved and the degree of rotation. There is an option to switch between different gizmo modes to focus on a single task and make adjustments more efficiently.

aftereffectsgizmo.jpg

Adobe redesigned the camera navigation tools to make it easier to navigate 3D spaces, and a new default scene camera streamlines the scene setup process with multiple cameras that highlight different viewpoints and orbit and pan around objects with keyboard shortcuts.

The new Premiere Pro and After Effects updates can be downloaded today using the Creative Cloud desktop application. Adobe's full Creative Cloud plans, which cover the complete range of Adobe CC software, start at $52.99 per month.

Article Link: Adobe Announces Updates for Premiere Pro and After Effects
 

SkyRom

macrumors regular
Dec 17, 2018
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Something tells me a silver-haired fox is going to be updating me on this report later this afternoon with a glorious smile
 

bsbeamer

macrumors 601
Sep 19, 2012
4,078
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Screen Shot 2020-09-15 at 9.58.29 AM.png

These are really just point updates for Creative Cloud. Still no sign of an update for AE available, yet. Clone your system before updating if you rely on these apps...
 
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mBox

macrumors 68020
Jun 26, 2002
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Fingers crossed otherwise this is massively disappointing.
Since it's only targeted in the beta, might as well move on.
Seems like the planned this on the same day as the Apple update.
And scene detection...good lord, that comes in at, "its about time".
 

Digital Skunk

macrumors G3
Dec 23, 2006
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In my imagination
Was hoping to see some definitive optimization for the Mac Pro.

I'm sure Adobe isn't going to wait until Apple's ARM is released and in their hands before getting their software running smoothly on Apple hardware.
 

Websnapx2

macrumors 6502
Apr 24, 2003
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Was hoping to see some definitive optimization for the Mac Pro.

I'm sure Adobe isn't going to wait until Apple's ARM is released and in their hands before getting their software running smoothly on Apple hardware.
A couple of things and I may be misunderstanding your comment so bare with me — Adobe already has an ARM from Apple in their hands — Apple’s ARM developer kit is a Mac Mini with an A12Z CPU was made available for developers at the end of June and I cannot imagine Adobe not requesting one, or being sent at least one specifically by Apple.

And it seemed connected but this could be where my misunderstanding comes in — The Mac Pro will be the last machine to switch to Apple Silicon, I'd stake my life on it. It isn't just about capability (though I am absolutely sure they haven't scaled up the A-Series chips that high yet), but it is also about consumer trust — both from a purchase perspective (people just dropped +6K$ just last year), as well as a power perspective (would people be willing to drop that much money on a completely new architecture spawned from mobile chips in a major investment). I have no doubt Apple will get there but they will need to show progress — light laptops, then iMacs/Minis, Macbook Pros, iMac Pros then Mac Pros.
 

Digital Skunk

macrumors G3
Dec 23, 2006
8,053
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In my imagination
Not a total misunderstanding, the Mac Pro is excellent. Some of Adobe's titles aren't. Premiere and After Effects mainly, those two from what I've gathered (and experienced) aren't utilizing all of the cores or the GPU on the Mac Pro very effectively.

A couple of things and I may be misunderstanding your comment so bare with me — Adobe already has an ARM from Apple in their hands — Apple’s ARM developer kit is a Mac Mini with an A12Z CPU was made available for developers at the end of June and I cannot imagine Adobe not requesting one, or being sent at least one specifically by Apple.

Right, I agree. I'm hoping that Adobe isn't waiting to get all of their ARM ducks in a row before making their software run smoothly with the last Intel Macs on the market.

And it seemed connected but this could be where my misunderstanding comes in — The Mac Pro will be the last machine to switch to Apple Silicon, I'd stake my life on it. It isn't just about capability (though I am absolutely sure they haven't scaled up the A-Series chips that high yet), but it is also about consumer trust — both from a purchase perspective (people just dropped +6K$ just last year), as well as a power perspective (would people be willing to drop that much money on a completely new architecture spawned from mobile chips in a major investment). I have no doubt Apple will get there but they will need to show progress — light laptops, then iMacs/Minis, Macbook Pros, iMac Pros then Mac Pros.

Connected yes, and I also agree. I've been telling people to buy a Mac now if they need it, even if it's an Air or MacBook Pro. RevA models with ARM may not be perfect and may need time. And the computers we have now aren't slouches. The MacPro, like the PowerMac G5 will be the lsat to move to ARM and will probably take about a year.

There are still a handful of PowerMac G5s in operation near me, so a current Intel Mac Pro will last a decade or more.

Overall, I am waiting with baited breath for Adobe to make Premiere run as smoothly on the Mac Pro as FCPX does ... or at least as smooth and fast as it does on a PC.
 
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jlocker

macrumors 65816
Jun 20, 2011
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A couple of things and I may be misunderstanding your comment so bare with me — Adobe already has an ARM from Apple in their hands — Apple’s ARM developer kit is a Mac Mini with an A12Z CPU was made available for developers at the end of June and I cannot imagine Adobe not requesting one, or being sent at least one specifically by Apple.

And it seemed connected but this could be where my misunderstanding comes in — The Mac Pro will be the last machine to switch to Apple Silicon, I'd stake my life on it. It isn't just about capability (though I am absolutely sure they haven't scaled up the A-Series chips that high yet), but it is also about consumer trust — both from a purchase perspective (people just dropped +6K$ just last year), as well as a power perspective (would people be willing to drop that much money on a completely new architecture spawned from mobile chips in a major investment). I have no doubt Apple will get there but they will need to show progress — light laptops, then iMacs/Minis, Macbook Pros, iMac Pros then Mac Pros.

I would agree, the Xeon processors in the iMac Pro and the Mac Pro with ECC memory is hard to beat. These systems are designed for 24x7 workstation and server computing. The Mac Pro is nice because of all the upgrades you can do on it. I got a MacBook Pro 16 with 32gb of memory and 2TB of SSD storage. I don't use my home computer for high level computing processing for work. My last computer was a Mac Pro 2009 and I loved it, lasted 10 years. Decided to go with a high end MacBook Pro. If Apple had a Mac Pro mini with a price tag around $3000 with some upgrading I think I would have purchased that. To get the best performance out of Mac OS 11 you need native apps, be it under Intel x86 or ARM processing. Rosetta II is a stepping stone for transition of Applications.
 
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Mr. Dee

macrumors 68040
Dec 4, 2003
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Are these apps easy to learn? Could you put a newbie in front of it and they just start using it?
 

Websnapx2

macrumors 6502
Apr 24, 2003
489
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Not a total misunderstanding, the Mac Pro is excellent. Some of Adobe's titles aren't. Premiere and After Effects mainly, those two from what I've gathered (and experienced) aren't utilizing all of the cores or the GPU on the Mac Pro very effectively.
100% agree it doesn't seem to bad until you run Final cut X and see the speed it could have.

Right, I agree. I'm hoping that Adobe isn't waiting to get all of their ARM ducks in a row before making their software run smoothly with the last Intel Macs on the market.
I think they are going to transition to ARM, with that being the focus, then they will announce PS on ARM, then Illustrator, then the whole suite by the time Mac Book Pros come out/announced. They will do updates but the writing is on the wall for intel on Mac — Adobe is too big a ship to be that nimble (so much reliance on legacy architecture) that they will just focus on the transition.

Connected yes, and I also agree. I've been telling people to buy a Mac now if they need it, even if it's an Air or MacBook Pro. RevA models with ARM may not be perfect and may need time. And the computers we have now aren't slouches. The MacPro, like the PowerMac G5 will be the lsat to move to ARM and will probably take about a year.
There are still a handful of PowerMac G5s in operation near me, so a current Intel Mac Pro will last a decade or more.
To be fair, even RevH models aren't perfect but you are right — especially for a work machine there is no way I'd get a RevA unless word came back from others that it was solid. We also have a few PowerMac Pros (Intel ones) and they are workhorses. I haven't tried bu apparently you can put fairly modern NVidia cards in them too. Amazing, considering.

Overall, I am waiting with baited breath for Adobe to make Premiere run as smoothly on the Mac Pro as FCPX does ... or at least as smooth and fast as it does on a PC.
Yeah, somehow over time the Macs have gotten the short end of that — and a lot of it comes down to graphics card support. I really hope Apple makes it dead easy for them so effort can't be an excuse. Adobe is single-handedly keeping FPC relevant.
 
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MVMNT

macrumors 6502
Apr 28, 2010
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If they add ARM support to After Effects any time soon it will be a joke if they don't even get Multi-core support sorted first.
 

Websnapx2

macrumors 6502
Apr 24, 2003
489
494
YES! And shifting the conversation a bit, I am really expecting Adobe to put some of those titles onto the iPad.
honestly, I think that part is table stakes for them. They will already be working in ARM — it would be easier for them to have all the code in one Pkg and hardware detect to confirm what interface to load/limitations to activate.

If they do not announce that when they show their ARM release, they dropped the ball — not like a real competitor can step in to capitalize on it though...
 
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bsbeamer

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Sep 19, 2012
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Not necessary. Every app update is available for redownload. Click the ellipsis next to the app in CC and then on "Other Version" - a list of every update will appear there.

When was the last time you tried this with Adobe video tools successfully? Often features are missing/removed/broken or the specific version magically disappears. Simple Carbon Copy Cloner to a spare drive before update eliminates this risk and makes it a TON faster to get back up and running.
 

handsome pete

macrumors 68000
Aug 15, 2008
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Are these apps easy to learn? Could you put a newbie in front of it and they just start using it?

Premiere? I'd say so. Most non-linear editors are pretty intuitive (not looking at you Avid). Hell, my mom is one of the most computer illiterate people on the planet and she was able to convert, edit, and burn to DVD all of the family home videos from VHS using Final Cut Express a few years back.


After Effects? There will be a bit of a learning curve involved here.
 

handsome pete

macrumors 68000
Aug 15, 2008
1,725
259
When was the last time you tried this with Adobe video tools successfully? Often features are missing/removed/broken or the specific version magically disappears. Simple Carbon Copy Cloner to a spare drive before update eliminates this risk and makes it a TON faster to get back up and running.

I've had to do this a few times and it's pretty seamless and quick. One of the reasons I'm not so wary about updating CC applications sooner rather than later.
 
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