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jwolf6589

macrumors 601
Original poster
Dec 15, 2010
4,860
1,609
Colorado
With the Photos and preview apps it seems that these do much of the basics of photo editing. I know Photoshop has some advanced features not available in the basic apps with the Mac. I was out shooting today and needed to edit a photo and Photos was able to do the job quite well, I guess for my basic photo needs I don't need photoshop. Who uses Photoshop and what are your needs?
 

r.harris1

macrumors 68020
Feb 20, 2012
2,202
12,660
Denver, Colorado, USA
I use a raw converter for most work (Capture One in my case) and jump to a pixel editor like Photoshop (or Affinity) only if I need to do things that are tricky enough to require the excellent content aware fill or other complex healing work. I've also used it for frame averaging. I know some folks use it for focus stacking, HDR, Panos, etc.

But yes, Photos does a good job at broad stroke changes to an image and it is very, very fast. Using plugins from companies like Luminar, you can even do local edits (where you can apply changes like contrast, saturation, exposure, etc to just a part of the image).
 

deep diver

macrumors 68030
Jan 17, 2008
2,707
4,500
Philadelphia.
There are probably 10 or more different programs people around here use for photo editing. That does not include the DAM (digital asset management) programs. Photoshop is just one of many.
I use Photoshop Elements, Lightroom, and Google's NIK package (from before DxO bought it.) For me, photography is about the art, and making an image speak as beautifully as it can. Even when I take family or casual event picts, I want them to have artistic value. At the same time, I avoid over processing. So, for me, I want color and lighting correction, ability to crop, distortion correction, etc.
Just as with your new Powershot, you have to decide what you are interested in doing as a photographer. Don't look for tools and then decide what you want to do with photography. Decide what you want to do and then choose the tools.
I suggest, as will others, that you look at the POTD and Challenge Contest threads to begin to get an idea about how people use this medium. Hopefully, it will inspire you.
 

mollyc

macrumors 604
Aug 18, 2016
7,945
49,167
I am an advanced hobbyist who shoots manual mode and raw and wants complete control of my image from start to finish. I start in LR and finish in PS. In PS I will do color corrections, add overlays in different blending modes, clone, straighten. Basically anything advanced that can't be done in LR for raw corrections.
 

robgendreau

macrumors 68040
Jul 13, 2008
3,468
330
Photos is to Photoshop sort of like Text Edit to Word. There really isn't a comparison, except both can work on images. But in fact Photoshop can create images even without a photo. But like Text Edit vs Word, if you don't need a more comprehensive too, you don't need it.

To answer the question though, I use it mostly for composites, complex layered and blended images, content aware fill and panoramas, stacking to lessen noise and focus stacking, and color swapping. And luminance masking, and applying LUTs. And probably other stuff I'm not thinking of.
 
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Slartibart

macrumors 68040
Aug 19, 2020
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Gentleperson,

my five cents: I think the best photo is the one you like or the one which induces joy in the ones you present it too. This has, as for example @Deepdiver above put it, some artistic aspects.
Basically there are at least 2 steps after you have taking a picture:

* first you “develop” your picture - exposure, details, color saturation, tonal contrast, etc.. Photos in RAW format offer the maximum possible at this step to optimise these parameters of a good picture to make it into a better one. There programs or apps for this step e.g. Lightroom, Capture One, Affinity Photo, Apple Photo, Google Snapseed, Pixelmator Photo & Pixelmator Pro, and more. (Many of the parameters you can adjust in a RAW file you can technically adjust in a JPEG, to get a better understanding on digital (pro)RAW I recommend this blog entry from the creators of the Hallide camera app for iOS/iPadOS.

* and then there are programs or apps which offer additional filtering, sophisticated machine learning tools, compositing, etc. While some of the “developer”programs and apps mentioned before integrate and offer this - it is the domain of Photoshop, Affinity Photo, Gimp, Nik Collection/DxO, Pixelmator & Co.

Additionally you might need some form of photo management software/app: Apple Photos, Adobe Bridge&Lightroom, Darktable, Pixelmator Photo, etc. provide this functionality.

What is best, you ask? In my opinion there is there is no definitive answer to that. Personal preferences, requirements or restrictions, knowledge, field of work, access to people who use particular programs or apps, laziness, support etc. will make people choose something to create some kind of workflow to end up with photographs they like a lot.
 

AlaskaMoose

macrumors 68040
Apr 26, 2008
3,530
13,389
Alaska
While I still use PhotoShop CS6 on a 2019 iMac running under Mojave, there are a lot of other apps that are just as good for photo editing as CS6. For example, Affinity Photo, which by the way also works quite well with the DXO's NIK Software bundle. Yes, there is a steep learning curve with Affinity Photo, but if you are already proficient with PhotoShop, then the learning curve is not bad at all.

Another app that is quite good is DXO's PhotoLab, which gets even better if you add to it the DXO's NIK software bundle. Learning to use this app is quite easy, too.

Then don't forget an app that has been available for Apple computer for quite a lot of years, and that is the so called, "the poor man's PhotoShop" (Graphic Converter). Designed by Lemke Software in Germany, and after so many years it is as reliable as it has ever been. Relatively inexpensive, and with plenty of free updates. Also, from version 6x to version 11x is quite an upgrade jump that costs only $25.00.
 
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AlaskaMoose

macrumors 68040
Apr 26, 2008
3,530
13,389
Alaska
Gentleperson,

my five cents: I think the best photo is the one you like or the one which induces joy in the ones you present it too. This has, as for example @Deepdiver above put it, some artistic aspects.
Basically there are at least 2 steps after you have taking a picture:

* first you “develop” your picture - exposure, details, color saturation, tonal contrast, etc.. Photos in RAW format offer the maximum possible at this step to optimise these parameters of a good picture to make it into a better one. There programs or apps for this step e.g. Lightroom, Capture One, Affinity Photo, Apple Photo, Google Snapseed, Pixelmator Photo & Pixelmator Pro, and more. (Many of the parameters you can adjust in a RAW file you can technically adjust in a JPEG, to get a better understanding on digital (pro)RAW I recommend this blog entry from the creators of the Hallide camera app for iOS/iPadOS.

* and then there are programs or apps which offer additional filtering, sophisticated machine learning tools, compositing, etc. While some of the “developer”programs and apps mentioned before integrate and offer this - it is the domain of Photoshop, Affinity Photo, Gimp, Nik Collection/DxO, Pixelmator & Co.

Additionally you might need some form of photo management software/app: Apple Photos, Adobe Bridge&Lightroom, Darktable, Pixelmator Photo, etc. provide this functionality.

What is best, you ask? In my opinion there is there is no definitive answer to that. Personal preferences, requirements or restrictions, knowledge, field of work, access to people who use particular programs or apps, laziness, support etc. will make people choose something to create some kind of workflow to end up with photographs they like a lot.
Excellent response!
 

Clix Pix

macrumors Core
My primary image editing software is DXO Photolab 4 and along with it I frequently also use the NIK Collection (mainly Silver Efex for doing B&W conversions and adjustments). I also have Luminar AI which is handy for quick-and-dirty edits, nothing fancy and/or quickly removing a dust bunny which I overlooked during my main editing session. In addition I have a few specialized programs such as Photo Mechanic, Optic, Topaz Sharpen AI, Topaz Gigapixel, Topaz Studio and Topaz DeNoise, and one or two others.

I have never used iPhoto or Photos, as I prefer to have more control over my images during the editing piece of this as well as determining the way they are managed and stored/archived once I've processed them. As most of us here do, I shoot in RAW. The only time I shoot in jpeg is when I pick up my iPhone for a fast snapshot or two.

In many ways editing and retouching images is another whole skill set in addition to actually shooting photos, especially when using advanced techniques and tools such as those available in Photoshop. Some editing programs make this much easier than it was in the past while others offer more features and complexity. For basic everyday quick editing Apple's Photos is probably quite sufficient and it comes free, bundled with every Apple computer, iPad and iPhone. Some editing programs these days are fairly expensive, although there are a few which are more modestly priced or even free.
 

Apple fanboy

macrumors Ivy Bridge
Feb 21, 2012
55,902
54,198
Behind the Lens, UK
I mostly use LR. I used to have the standalone LR and never had PS. Now I had to upgrade to subscription a couple of years back (I hate subscriptions), I have PS as well. But in reality I use it for 1 in 100 photos. For me photography is about getting out and shooting. I spend up to 13 hours a day in front of my computer screens for work. I really don’t want to spend much more.
 
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Clix Pix

macrumors Core
It really has only been about the past couple of years that I've begun to get more interested in going beyond the basics with my image editing, but, yeah, for me the act of taking the photos is still much more pleasing and fun than sitting at the computer later sorting through the images, then editing them.
 
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jagolden

macrumors 68000
Feb 11, 2002
1,544
1,424
On the contrary- all photo editing packages are cheaper these days than they have ever been.

‘There are many, good, affordable image editing apps available but you’d have to prove "all" to me. Adobe comes to mind.
 

Geezerviser

macrumors newbie
Jan 21, 2021
25
2
I use Lightroom for color correction/light/shadows/sharpness and so on. So for me, it's enough. Photoshop is kinda complicated :)
 
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MBAir2010

macrumors 604
May 30, 2018
6,648
6,099
there
I use photoshop for graphic design and cartooning, but never for photos
nikon view something edits enhances and converts all my photos。
 

cupcakes2000

macrumors 68040
Apr 13, 2010
3,905
5,354
‘There are many, good, affordable image editing apps available but you’d have to prove "all" to me. Adobe comes to mind.
Well, to use the Adobe example as you suggested; Photoshop cs5.5, for example, was I think about $700. That was for one single version of standalone Photoshop, and as far as I remember, only valid for the OS you purchased it for. Though I maybe be wrong and it could have covered both OSX and windows. You would then need to upgrade the bulk of the price on the next version to keep updated.

Nowadays you get Photoshop plus Lightroom classic plus lightroom CC and Creative Cloud (including storage) for sync across all major platforms - including the relevent apps for each platform, plus a multitude of other mini apps. This is about 10 a month for always up to date products.
That’s about $120 a year.

Aside from the fact you’re tied in to a subscription (which is not the issue at hand here) or the fact that you ‘owned’ the previous version without losing it, that’s still a substantially better deal price wise .

I think people forget just how expensive and relatively inaccessible Photoshop was.
 
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robgendreau

macrumors 68040
Jul 13, 2008
3,468
330
I agree with cupcakes2000; image processing software seems much cheaper to me know. Comparing Lr Classic and Photoshop eg. I got several years out of those by skipping an update, but they were like $700 and $150 if I recall. And no online storage either. Or mobile app. I think even Aperture dropped in price once it when into the app store; it was $200 for v 2.0 IIRC, and dropped to $79 in the MAS.

I'm not sure about Capture One...I don't think it's dropped, nor has Photo Mechanic. But they haven't raised the prices either I don't believe. But not sure.
 

AlaskaMoose

macrumors 68040
Apr 26, 2008
3,530
13,389
Alaska
I agree with cupcakes2000; image processing software seems much cheaper to me know. Comparing Lr Classic and Photoshop eg. I got several years out of those by skipping an update, but they were like $700 and $150 if I recall. And no online storage either. Or mobile app. I think even Aperture dropped in price once it when into the app store; it was $200 for v 2.0 IIRC, and dropped to $79 in the MAS.

I'm not sure about Capture One...I don't think it's dropped, nor has Photo Mechanic. But they haven't raised the prices either I don't believe. But not sure.
I spent a lot of money on CS5 and then CS6, but now with Affinity Photo and DXO's apps I have no use for Adobe CC products. I am still using CS6 on a 2019 iMac (running under Mojave), but plan to get rid of CS6 as I update to Big Sur.
 

Apple fanboy

macrumors Ivy Bridge
Feb 21, 2012
55,902
54,198
Behind the Lens, UK
Well, to use the Adobe example as you suggested; Photoshop cs5.5, for example, was I think about $700. That was for one single version of standalone Photoshop, and as far as I remember, only valid for the OS you purchased it for. Though I maybe be wrong and it could have covered both OSX and windows. You would then need to upgrade the bulk of the price on the next version to keep updated.

Nowadays you get Photoshop plus Lightroom classic plus lightroom CC and Creative Cloud (including storage) for sync across all major platforms - including the relevent apps for each platform, plus a multitude of other mini apps. This is about 10 a month for always up to date products.
That’s about $120 a year.

Aside from the fact you’re tied in to a subscription (which is not the issue at hand here) or the fact that you ‘owned’ the previous version without losing it, that’s still a substantially better deal price wise .

I think people forget just how expensive and relatively inaccessible Photoshop was.
This is all true, but I used to buy just LR and that is enough for me (most of the time). So now my price has gone up compared to buying just LR standalone.
 
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