Adobe Premier Pro 24fps, 23.976fps dilemma

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by Gloor, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. Gloor macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    #1
    I'm editing my first animated short movie and I have the animation done in 24fps so I will be putting it in Premier as 24fps. But if I choose one of the presets HDV 1080p and display format to 24fps it gives me the timebase only 23.976 which if I add music that was synched at 24fps would make it offsync after a minute or so.
    So, is it the best way to do custom settings and set editing mode to desktop then choose frame size 1920 x 1080 and then timebase and display format to 24fps or is there something I am missing here? I don't really know that much about these things so thats why I thought I would ask you, as you know a lot more than I do. :))

    I used to try Final Cut Express but that doesn't have 24fps and also my renders always got reduced quality after export so I thought I would try Premier. Is there any effective way how to preserve the quality in Premier? :)

    Thanks for any feedback

    Also, do I select pixel aspect ratio square pixels or something else?
    I think my renders from maya are square pixels so i pressume that I should use the same in Premier, correct?
     
  2. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #2
    go back and re-export your animation as 23.976fps. you don't want 24fps unless you are transferring to film.

    you want 1920x1080 square pixels.
     
  3. Gloor thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    #3
    well, all the animation is done in maya at 24fps. then i give it to my composer who does the music and the composer works at 24fps. So, shall I do it at 24 and then the final movie with music and soundFX export at 23.976 (that shouldn't affect the music etc, should it?) Its gonna go on DVD, web and if the result is good then maybe BD but I doubt that at this stage.
    So, what do you really think is the best at this case? Also, when I set 23.976 in Premier it doesn't allow me to the same for display format setting as that only offers me 24fps, feet or frames. Would that conflict with itself? (23.976 timebase vs 24fps display format) I'm sorry if its a silly question but I'm new to this

    Just in a nutshell, why would I want 23.976?
     
  4. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #4
    video runs at 23.976/29.97fps and not 24/30fps. it has to do with old NTSC broadcasting methods and the addition of color information piggy-backed onto the original B&W signal.

    since you've had everything composed for 24fps, you might as well go ahead and create a custom sequence in premiere that is 1920x1080 24fps. When it goes to DVD it will be converted to 23.976. You won't lose visual quality, but the audio will have a slight pitch change. You're composer can correct for this in Logic/ProTools and send you new audio.
     
  5. Gloor thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007
    #5
    Ok, I have another idea so lets see if this is possible.

    I will render it from maya at 24fps then I will use quicktime and to compile 24fps movie (not sure if Premier Pro can do image sequence as easily as QT). Then I would take it to premier and set my project to be 23.976 when I add some effects, I would then send it to my composer and I pressume that she can switch in Logic Pro and work on 23.976, right? As if Logic Pro imports the video as 23.976 then it doesn't affect her workflow and then when she gives me the audio file I can then take it straight to Premier and do final export, right?

    Also, if I do the final 23.976 as you suggest would I then have any trouble posting it on web or anything?

    Anyway, thank you for your advice. I appreciate that
     
  6. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
  7. Gloor thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2007

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