Adobe Throws in the towel

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Blakjack, Apr 16, 2011.

  1. Blakjack macrumors 68000

    Blakjack

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    #1
    Sorry if this has already been posted

    http://www.tuaw.com/2011/04/16/adobe-adds-http-live-streaming-to-its-flash-media-server/

    Adobe showcased several new and upcoming features of its Flash Media Server during the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) trade show last week. One interesting feature for media producers who plan to target iOS users is the eventual addition of the iPhone-friendly HTTP Live Streaming to the Media Server's supported protocol list. Adobe blogger Kevin Towes noted this change in a "sneak peak [sic]" of developments on the streaming and encoding front, but no specific timeframe was given for delivery of the new feature.

    HTTP Live Streaming is an HTTP-based media streaming protocol developed by Apple. It uses H.264 video and AAC or mp3 audio to deliver its media stream. The protocol is supported by QuickTime on Mac OS X and is compatible with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

    This move by Adobe to support a non-Flash streaming format could be framed as a win for Apple in the Flash versus HTML 5 streaming wars. Since Apple shows no signs of moving towards Flash support on iOS, Adobe is modifying its services to support mobile streaming on Apple's platforms; this makes Adobe's solution more universally useful and compatible, while handing Apple a small but significant win.
     
  2. W1MRK macrumors 6502

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    Dec 9, 2010
    #2
    I have always been nervous over Flash and its constant needed security patches and loopholes. I think Apple did the right thing here. Now if only we knew if their Blu-Ray predictions were also correct.
     
  3. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

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    Feb 23, 2010
    #3
    Ok, well I have to yet again ask the same old question and perhaps point out the same things again :(

    I take it this is for video?

    Video being the thing Flash was never make for, it was just 1 thing it happened to do, and as it did it, just happened to be picked up on.

    So, what about the thing that Flash really is, Vector based animation. Is this being addressed with this news?
     
  4. Blakjack thread starter macrumors 68000

    Blakjack

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    Jun 23, 2009
  5. TheWheelMan macrumors 6502a

    TheWheelMan

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    Mar 15, 2011
    #5
    What did they predict about Blu-Ray?
     
  6. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

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    Feb 23, 2010
    #6
    Steve Jobs does not want to fit BluRay drives into Macs as that would give Apple owners the ability to watch movies in higher quality on their large hi-res screens via a 1080p BluRay disk they buy in a normal store, rather than buying the same movie from Apple for the same price or more in only 720p from iTunes.

    iTunes does not sell 1080p movies yet, but they want to make it as difficult as possible for you with Bluray, and as easy as possible to buy and watch from them.

    It's just about them wanting to make the most money, nothing else. They are in business to make money, so will obviously rubbish anything they can't realistically offer due to file size.

    So it's been decreed that 720p is good enough for Apple users.

    Of course, all this will change once they can/do supply 1080p video's in the future. Then the rule book will be rewritten ;)
     
  7. W1MRK macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2010
    #7
    Hmm, Ok as I read your post it makes me rethink it. Here I thought that Apples concern was blu-ray was a fad but HD seems to be the future. i.e. retina displays.

    Sad actually we don't have the option.
     
  8. zweigand macrumors 6502a

    zweigand

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    #8
    The majority of what people want to see on an iPad, but can't because it's Flash, is video. This is great news.

    If you want to play Flash games the answer is, and always will be, "look elsewhere".
     
  9. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    #9
    The whole "BluRay is a fad" is just something to deflect you and set up a false reason which they try and sell to consumers, many of which will accept this.

    As I say, They naturally want you money, and if you can buy a 1080p BluRay and watch on your Mac for $15 (or less if it's on special offer) or pay iTunes $15 for the same film in only 720p

    And don't forget, you can then sell the BluRay if you wish, or give it to a friend/charity. Then they are going to miss out on iTunes movie sales.

    A BluRay drive also reads normal DVD's and CD's and only now costs a few bucks more.

    Indeed, the future is HiDef, so why deliberately not offer the best image quality to your customers? It's just about making money, and coming up with some semi believable reason you can send out to people.

    1080p is, with most people's Internet connections still a very large chunk of data to send to people over the net.

    As tech moves on, perhaps better compression, or better net connections then 1080p will come from iTunes. But at the moment they have to do all they can to get you to buy movies direct from them.
     
  10. Piggie macrumors 604

    Piggie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2010
    #10
    No no no.

    Not games. There are sites that allow you to upload images, but the code is flash based.

    Or others that allow you to view live antique auction houses and bid live, but you can't as they use flash code.

    Not video, not games, but I suppose you would class them as online apps that allow things to work.
     
  11. zweigand macrumors 6502a

    zweigand

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    Oct 19, 2003
    #11
    That's where apps come into play. It's up to the companies/websites to give iOS users that functionality. For example, Mint.com has a lot of Flash on their site ...but they cater to iOS through a native app. Things like file uploads do not require Flash, that just so happens to be what the company chose to use. It's up to those companies to evolve and cater to iOS users. The mere fact that iOS doesn't have a navigable file structure means those Flash-based uploads wouldn't work anyway.

    Heck, even if those companies don't want to drop Flash, they can natively export Flash apps and list them in the App Store now that Apple allows it again.
     

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