Adobe's confusing message re:Flash Builder for mobile apps

Discussion in 'iPad' started by FloatingBones, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. FloatingBones macrumors 65816

    FloatingBones

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    #1
    Developers making apps for multiple mobile platforms -- iPad, Android, Playbook, etc. -- can use Adobe Flash Builder for that purpose. From Adobe's product website:
    But Adobe's product announcement this weekend gives a different story. Adobe used the native tools for their iPad and Android apps. Even though it should have been faster, they didn't use their own Flash Builder for making their multi-platform Photoshop Touch app. Adobe's actions speak louder than their [marketing] words.

    Why didn't Adobe use their own tools for building and deploying this product? For product developers targeting multiple tablet platforms, when does it actually make sense to use Flash Builder?
     
  2. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Location:
    First university coding class = 46 years ago
    #2
    Perhaps those teams were already well along with their native versions. Or maybe just because they want even more speed. It's okay to want that. A photo tool is quite different from say, a simpler application.

    As they said, for when you don't want (or have time, or money, or know how) to write native apps for all your product targets.
     
  3. FloatingBones thread starter macrumors 65816

    FloatingBones

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    #3
    Adobe previewed their Flash cross-building environment about 18 months ago; internal teams could have had access well before that -- if they wanted it.

    Flash itself definitely pre-dates any possible initiative for these touch-based tools. Remember, only a tiny amount of fine-tuning should be required for any particular Flash delivery platform. If Flash really were as good as native, the team could have done all their early work on any flash device and then worried about the [minimal] porting efforts in, say, the last six months.

    This possible explanation makes no sense.

    I don't think you read my posting -- and Adobe's product literature -- very well. Exactly what part of uncompromised native applications do you not understand? If apps created through Adobe's tools were uncompromised, then a native app would be no faster.

    But what is the tradeoff? You are implying that an app created with Adobe's Flash tool is a compromise (compared to native apps). Based on their actions, it appears that Adobe agrees. How much do you lose by making your app in Flash?
     
  4. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
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    #4
    I never said it was as good as native. I'm just answering from my long experience why they probably did it the way they did.

    No need to be snippy. It's marketing blah blah, so I didn't really notice all the hype, since I wouldn't believe it anyway :)

    The only ones who would believe it are those who lack the ability to create native applications, and they're the ones who need it the most. To them, it probably IS the most uncompromising solution available.

    Of course it is a compromise. But perhaps a worthwhile one. I mean heck, I'm all for writing everything in machine language for best speed, but I guarantee you that most developers compromise and write in C instead. Everything is a compromise.

    Like I said, it depends on what kind of app it is.

    Most apps are pretty static things, so they'd probably actually benefit from adding the available animations and other flashy stuff.

    Quite a few games could probably also make use of the available features.

    The huge win of course is that you write it once for multiple targets. To someone who needs that, but who is otherwise facing deadlines or lack of funding, that's big.

    The upshot is this: the marketing is not targeted to non-developers, and real developers would (or should) understand what is hype and what's not.
     

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