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Stylus-maker Adonit has introduced the Neo Pro, the first iPad stylus that can be magnetically stored and wirelessly charged on the side of an iPad, just like the second-generation Apple Pencil.

adonit-neo-pro.jpeg

Few existing third-party styluses are able to be magnetically attached to the side of an iPad, and the Adonit Neo Pro appears to be the first to also wirelessly charge on the side of an iPad like the Apple Pencil. Most powered third-party stylyses for the iPad have to be charged via a USB-C port.

The Neo Pro costs $44.99, considerably less than the $129 Apple Pencil. While it has similar functionality to the Apple Pencil with features like tilt sensitivity and palm rejection, it does not have pressure sensitivity.

When connected via Bluetooth, the Neo Pro can display its battery status in Apple's iPadOS battery widget. The stylus features a replaceable spiral tip, a click-to-turn-on button on the top, and up to nine hours of battery life.

The Adonit Neo Pro is compatible with the 11-inch iPad Pro, the third-generation 12.9-inch iPad Pro or newer, the fourth-generation iPad Air or newer, and the sixth-generation iPad mini. The stylus is now available to pre-order in Space Gray and Matte Silver.

Article Link: Adonit Neo Pro Stylus Mimics Apple Pencil Features for $44.99
 
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Eric_WVGG

macrumors 6502
Oct 25, 2016
251
486
gentrification fallout zone
I honestly think some antitrust pressure should be put against Apple over some of these accessories.

There are no security reasons for the APIs that control stylus pressure sensitivity to remain proprietary. Really nothing makes sense except making sure that it is impossible for other products to remain competitive.

This goes for AirPods as well… everyone knows that pairing bluetooth buds with the iPhone is a miserable experience compared to AirPods. If Apple doesn't want to sell the H1 chips to competitors, they should at least be opening up the protocols.

Monopoly laws are set up to make sure that a dominant force in one market cannot use that to leverage control in another market. It's fishy, because Apple doesn't have a monopoly on smartphones; but they do have a monopoly on iPhones. Regardless, this situation sucks for consumers.
 

maxfromdenmark

macrumors 6502a
May 8, 2011
652
1,103
Copenhagen
I honestly think some antitrust pressure should be put against Apple over some of these accessories.

There are no security reasons for the APIs that control stylus pressure sensitivity to remain proprietary. Really nothing makes sense except making sure that it is impossible for other products to remain competitive.

This goes for AirPods as well… everyone knows that pairing bluetooth buds with the iPhone is a miserable experience compared to AirPods. If Apple doesn't want to sell the H1 chips to competitors, they should at least be opening up the protocols.

Monopoly laws are set up to make sure that a dominant force in one market cannot use that to leverage control in another market. It's fishy, because Apple doesn't have a monopoly on smartphones; but they do have a monopoly on iPhones. Regardless, this situation sucks for consumers.
There is no other reason for this like pressing customers to buy an original pencil with pressure sensitivity for 125$
 

SoldOnApple

macrumors 6502a
Jul 20, 2011
947
1,581
Why doesn't Apple Pencil have hover, or a button? A button would help make up for no hover. Even cheap drawing tablets for Macs have hover.
 

SoldOnApple

macrumors 6502a
Jul 20, 2011
947
1,581
There is no other reason for this like pressing customers to buy an original pencil with pressure sensitivity for 125$
I think pencils of this kind that have good pressure sensitivity and tilt detection all cost $125 or more. With Jot's limited economy of scale compared to Apple, I don't think Jot can really compete without charging more money. They can compete by offering a simpler pencil for less money. For many typical design applications of a stylus you don't actually want pressure sensitivity anyway.
 

cicalinarrot

macrumors 6502
Apr 28, 2015
493
1,578
Likely people like me, who just want to be able to take notes, sketch ideas, and annotate PDFs.

If I didn’t already have an Apple Pencil, I’d grab one of these for sure.
Agreed, especially considering that if you buy the cheap iPads, the Pencil costs a third of the device itself.
Also nice if you want a pen for your kids to draw, for vector graphics, as a more precise controller for any app...
 

B4U

macrumors 68040
Oct 11, 2012
3,542
3,915
Undisclosed location
At that price, if the feature is the same as the crayon, that would be a great buy for those of us only use it to take notes.
Especially I do not believe the crayon charges like that.
 
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boak

macrumors 65816
Jun 26, 2021
1,368
2,193
I honestly think some antitrust pressure should be put against Apple over some of these accessories.

There are no security reasons for the APIs that control stylus pressure sensitivity to remain proprietary. Really nothing makes sense except making sure that it is impossible for other products to remain competitive.

This goes for AirPods as well… everyone knows that pairing bluetooth buds with the iPhone is a miserable experience compared to AirPods. If Apple doesn't want to sell the H1 chips to competitors, they should at least be opening up the protocols.

Monopoly laws are set up to make sure that a dominant force in one market cannot use that to leverage control in another market. It's fishy, because Apple doesn't have a monopoly on smartphones; but they do have a monopoly on iPhones. Regardless, this situation sucks for consumers.
Antitrust? 🤣

What market is it that you're referring to?
 

DD88

Suspended
Jun 6, 2022
343
706
I was interested as i’m an artist , and do digital art as well but I think the Apple Pencil suits my need already and this seems an inferior choice
 
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rjohnstone

macrumors 68040
Dec 28, 2007
3,894
4,492
PHX, AZ.
There is nothing in the iPad screen that detects where a pointer is beyond touch, that would be a massive undertaking. You're talking about an entirely new sensor.
It would require a new sensor under the digitizer, but it's not a "massive undertaking".
The tech already exists on other devices *cough Samsung.
Pretty sure Apple just doesn't want to pay patent fees/royalties on the tech.
 
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