Advantage of dedicated camera over phone cam?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by senseless, Jun 28, 2010.

  1. senseless macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #1
    As the title reads, why should I consider a digital camera over a new iphone with a camera built in?
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #2
    If you want [usually] better quality and more control over the various aspects of the shot.
     
  3. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    #3
    A camera is dedicated to what it was built for, making photos. Thus it has a bigger sensor and more settings to play with, thus more control.

    A phone with a camera is dedicated to what it was built for, making phone calls, and being able to shoot photos on the side.
     
  4. Westside guy macrumors 603

    Westside guy

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    #4
    Depends on the type of camera. If you're talking about small point-and-shoots with their tiny little sensors, the advantages they offer versus a phone camera are decreasing.
     
  5. Laird Knox macrumors 68000

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    #5
    And just to be clear, when they say sensor size they are talking about the actual dimension of the sensor - not the number of pixels.

    Possible differences:

    Optical zoom vs digital zoom
    Potentially better lens
    Better flash
    Easier to hold, take pictures
    More shooting options (manual vs automatic)
    Removable media

    Bottom line is that the new camera is pretty impressive. If you already have an iPhone and are happy with the images then there is no reason to get another camera.

    If you want a step up in the picture quality then a side by side test of the iPhone and camera in question would be your best way to evaluate the differences. From there the next step is into the world of DSLR. Pictures from the iPhone will never be confused with those from a DSLR, but then again you would buy multiple iPhones for the prixe. ;)
     
  6. jackerin macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    I think the prices seem pretty equal...
     
  7. senseless thread starter macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #7
    I was considering the Canon PowerShot SD1400 to replace my ancient 2 megapixel Canon Elph. A good smartphone cam might be good in bright sun, but may not perform well in low light. The tiny lens has got to be an issue too, but I've never been able to compare. Anybody use both?
     
  8. ManhattanPrjct macrumors 6502

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    #8
    If you are actually interested in photography and learning more about it, I'd get the camera. If you want to take better-than-decent pictures and have instant gratification uploading to social networking sites, stick with the iPhone.
     
  9. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #9
    Because one is a phone, and one is camera? Because one uses the best parts that will meet a price point, and the other uses the best parts that will meet a far lower price point and fit inside a case that is already full of phone thingys. Because if the prices for both units are about the same, but one unit has a phone, an OS, a touch screen, a phone (did I mention it makes phone calls), a GPS, a WiFi antenna, a Bluetooth antenna - and the other unit has a camera, and a .... well, it doesn't make phone calls....

    Sorry for the sarcasm, really I am a little bit, but the question was a little bit silly. On the other hand as a professional photographer, the fewer people with cameras the happier I am. :)
     
  10. MattSepeta macrumors 65816

    MattSepeta

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    #10
    Don't Do It

    The disadvantages are endless....
    With a dedicated camera, you will typically get less megapixels, lower FPS, slower speeds and much less creative control. You better stick with the phone if you are serious about taking good pictures.
     
  11. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #11
    snberk103 is a bit snarky, but you deserve it. Virtually every camera--from $5 keychain cameras to high-end DSLRs--have larger lenses than the camera built into any cell phone. Lenses gather light. The bigger, the better. There is no substitute for light on the image sensor. Westside Guy is correct about the size of the sensor. Again, the bigger, the better. Period. Also, most dedicated digital cameras removable storage. The number of photos that you can take with a dedicated digital camera is effectively unlimited.

    Adjustable focus. Optical magnification. I can go on, but I hope that you get the idea.
     
  12. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

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    #12
    Bigger, larger, moar light!!!

    Different purpose, but typically cameras are hard to have in your pocket all the time.
     
  13. snberk103 macrumors 603

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    #13
    Moi? No! :rolleyes:
     
  14. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

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    #14
    Vous. Oui! But is a good way:D
     
  15. Captpegleg macrumors member

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    #15
    If you need to ask…get the phone, you'll be happy with it.
     
  16. Laird Knox macrumors 68000

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    #16
    My first DSLR was $1300 and the one I want now is $8000. So yeah, several iPhones. ;)
     
  17. senseless thread starter macrumors 68000

    senseless

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    #17
    So far, Laird was the only one who actually answered the question specifically. I understand the fundamental differences between a decent point and shoot camera and a phone, but the actual photographs I haven't been able to compare.
     
  18. mdatwood macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    If all you want are the typical snapshot pictures then the new iPhone will likely work fine for you. If you want more then you need a real camera.

    The nice thing about the iPhone is built in GPS tagging of the pictures. I use it to take a single pic at each location before shooting with my DSLR.
     
  19. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

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  20. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #20
    Man, phone cameras have come a long way from the **** my SE T610 tried to pass off as pictures. :D
     
  21. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    #21
    That's because your question is essentially meaningless without some qualifiers. What kind of images are you wanting to compare? What size photographs do you want to compare? Are you going to be making prints? These are just a few of the questions you haven't answered, so it's no wonder you're not getting the "help" you are looking for.
     
  22. jackerin macrumors 6502a

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    #22
    My first DSLR was 300€ used...
     
  23. senseless thread starter macrumors 68000

    senseless

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  24. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #24
    I would use both. I don't think there is a cell phone camera on the market that can match the quality of the SD1400.
     
  25. aross99 macrumors 68000

    aross99

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    #25
    I think it comes down to a couple of factors...

    There is no question that the point and shoot can take better pictures. Features like the optical zoom, better lenses, bigger sensor, real flash, etc can all make for better images.

    But there is also the convenience factor.

    Do you take most of your pictures "on the go", where you have no advance planning, or do you take pictures more at planned events, like Birthdays, soccer games, graduations, etc?

    For on-the-go impromptu shooting, you can't beat your phone - it's the camera you have with you all the time (unless you take your point and shoot everywhere you go).

    For planned events, you can't beat the quality of the point and shoot. The Optical zoom can be especially valuable here, as can the real flash.

    Ideally, I would say you need both. You use your camera phone when you don't have your point and shoot, and you use your point and shoot, when you specifically take it along to get better pictures.
     

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