Advice for dealing with Apple Corporate

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Pomme, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. Pomme macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    Vermont
    #1
    Well, do I have a story for you.

    About two months ago, before leaving for a semester in Europe, I took my computer to the Apple Store in Seattle to have the internal microphone (which had never worked) repaired. I intended to use Skype from abroad, and wanted to make sure I could make phone calls with my computer. The broken mic was the latest of any number of problems I've had with a much beloved 2004 iBook, but my general goodwill to this computer outweighed any frustration with failed parts. Off I drive to the Apple Store in Seattle, an hour away, and off my computer goes for the repair.

    After the repair, I left the computer in the box it came back in, pushed off for a month-long backpacking trip, and had the computer shipped to me when I settled down at last in Germany, where I am writing from right now. Previous to all of this, however, I'd purchased a fairly expensive extended life battery. I waited four weeks for it to ship, planned in advance, and was incredibly excited to use my new, long-lasting iBook in cute little cafes on the Rhine. Imagine my surprise when, after taking my laptop out of my package, I began to notice that my long-lasting battery wasn't quite so long lasting. An hour later, when my battery was dead, I flipped the computer over. And there, instead of my new battery, there was a beat-up — much more beat-up than the shell of my computer, at least — Apple battery, with a serial number that did not correspond to my laptop whatsoever.

    A mistake in the repair center, perhaps. I was annoyed, if only because now I had to deal with this from Germany. A few days ago, when I finally got my internet connection set up, I tried calling Apple to explain the problem. I spent a good long time on the phone with a very confused and embarrassed tech support guy. He kept putting me on hold to "research" the problem. I can take a little bit of comfort in knowing that the mystery disappearance of my new, expensive battery is somewhat uncommon. A little.

    After an hour on the phone, Tech Support Guy #1 tells me to first contact the Apple Store in Seattle to have them replace the battery with a new Apple-made (standard life) battery. Then, he tells me, talk to Apple Corporate to see about "proposing a resolution." He'll send us the number in an e-mail. Great.

    The "number" is this address: apple.com/contact. Very helpful. We learn that they want us to "post" our problem instead of actually talking to a customer service representative. But we call the Apple Store in Seattle, only after waiting for the nine hour time difference to kick in. No answer. No actual person on the telephone. Bad connections. Try again. And eventually, just today, I called my Apple Help Line number again. I somewhat sheepishly explain the situation -- the bad connection to the Apple Store, the time difference woes, the inability to find a number for customer service.

    He's confused. What number did I call to get him? he wants to know. Oh. It happens to be the only number that I can call to reach customer service. That's great, I think; could he put me through to someone who I could speak to in person. This guy actually refuses to let me talk to anyone else, explains that I have to just "keep trying" and "staying on the line" with the Apple Store in Seattle, and that then (from Germany, on Skype, nine hours ahead), I should "call back" to the number I've already sat on hold for twenty minutes to reach.

    I have had it up to my ears now with phone support, but there is no way I'm "posting" about this problem after investing so much time into trying to resolve a very stupid mistake on Apple's part. My question now is: what sort of "resolution" do I propose to Apple Corporate? I was going to write this off as a mistake, and hope they'd rectify it -- either with a new battery, or a check for the amount of my old battery. Mind you, I bought the new battery specifically because of my move to Europe. It's been a huge inconvenience not having that battery life.

    Does anyone have any tips for dealing with tech/customer support over the phone? And does anyone have any ideas for a reasonable "resolution" to this situation?

    A very frustrated Pomme
     
  2. BilltheCat macrumors regular

    BilltheCat

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Location:
    Sanford FL
    #2
    wow. no idea what to say. You are accusing apple of stealing your new battery in effect. No wonder they are confused how to reply.
     
  3. Pomme thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    Vermont
    #3
    Oh, no. I don't mean to imply that. I have been nothing but polite on the telephone so far -- if anything, as baffled as the tech folks who have helped me. I don't care what happened to the battery. Right now, I just care that it's replaced. What's frustrating is that I am having to do a ton of leg work for someone's very blatant mistake.
     
  4. NuDarwin macrumors member

    NuDarwin

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2007
    #4
    yes, this happens *occasionally* and can usually be resolved fairly quickly. call 408.996.1010 (apple corporate's phone number) and tell them this:

    "while my ibook was in for repair (have your service ticket with you when you call, in case they want more information) the non-apple extended life battery that was in my ibook was replaced with an older, standard life apple battery for troubleshooting reasons. When they mailed the computer back to me from seattle, they forgot to put my extended life battery back in. When I called the Apple Store seattle, they referred me to you to propose a solution to this problem."

    i hope you get your battery back, or they buy a new one for you. but there is a way of avoiding this problem in future; instead of bringing your computers to the genius bar, bring them to a local Apple Authorized Service Provider. I have never had any poor experiences with them, and if they were to lose something, they would buy you a new one, and not force you to go jumping through the hoops of calling this number or that number. They really are better to do business with.

    hope this helps.
     

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