Advice for soon to be pc convert

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by amhsing, Aug 11, 2015.

  1. amhsing macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    #1
    Its time to replace my pc laptop and monitor. I want to switch to Mac since I already have an iphone and ipad. My uses are relatively simple - email, browsing, office and streaming over 500mb fibre. I want to replicate my PC setup - laptop, screen and wireless keyboard. But I've come up against a few issues - a fully loaded Macbook only offers 500gb so I work with that (tricky) or wait for a 1TB option or wait for an updated MacBook Pro; the thunderbolt Apple screen is a few years out of date and its less clear if that will be updated; and finally the cost....I expected this to be more than for pc, but I (naively?!) did not expect it to be twice the cost which is what it looks like right now.

    I'm going to have to wait to see what gets announced next month. Even then I might not be able to get what I want. The alternatives are buying pc again (noooo!) or using the same money to buy a mid range Apple laptop as well as a 21" Mac (but buying two computers doesn't really feel like a solution - it highlights the problem).

    I guess I am just surprised to find that this configuration is difficult and so much more expensive. I just wondered if others were using a different configuration I hadn't thought of or had thoughts on what I should do? Thanks in advance.

    AMH
     
  2. tdale macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2013
    Location:
    Christchurch, N.Z.
    #2
    The configs are simple and not a lot of variation, thats Apple. I have a late 2013 rMBP, 500GB SSD, Iris Pro gracphics that aren't too far off a reasonable discreet card. Why do you need so much storage for you use case? The AC wifi with my Apple Extreme is awesome. SSD is awesome, USB3 flash drives are awesome. You can use the phone/SMS/iMessage on all your devices, thats great. On an iPad forum I am on there are a couple that got non Apple monitors, work great. Perhaps a pre owned or refurb rMBP and a nice PC based monitor to save money.
     
  3. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    #3
    I guess I don't quite understand your question. The only issues I really see you have raised are the lack of the 1TB option in the Macbook (not surprising, see what's available and at what cost in similar form factors for Windows) and the cost of the 1TB upgrade in the Pro line which is undoubtedly expensive, although you are getting a much, much faster SSD than what you'd get in a Windows PC. Either figure out how to live with 512GB, wait, or pony up for the 1TB. Not many other options there!

    As for the screen, I can't see buying the Apple display which is terribly out of date. I'd buy a nice IPS 4k if you get a Pro, or maybe something like the 34" LG curved display to go with the Macbook.

    The option of buying two computers doesn't seem like a terrible one to me either, given the value that the iMac has when you factor in the price of a decent screen. It used to be that managing two computers was a real pain, but the cloud and Apple's various continuity tools really make moving from one mac to another quite seamless these days. The combination of a nice iMac for desk work at home and a portable Macbook for on the go is quite appealing.
     
  4. tdale macrumors 65816

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    Aug 11, 2013
    Location:
    Christchurch, N.Z.
    #4
    An SSD is an SSD. There is no such thing as a PC SSD. Wouldn't buying a better Macbook and a nice screen (as you mentioned) give a better overall package than spending similat on an older laptop and older iMac?
     
  5. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    #5
    That's not what I said. However, the SSD's that Apple is currently using in their Pro laptops are of a form-factor not-yet-adopted in the Windows laptop market (at least not in any meaningful numbers) meaning that they are at least twice as fast as what you would typically find there. http://www.computerworld.com/articl...e-new-macbook-literally-is-twice-as-fast.html
     
  6. tdale macrumors 65816

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    Aug 11, 2013
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    Christchurch, N.Z.
    #6
    Yes, its a new tech, so you wont find it everywhere, but t will soon be common, thats how tech goes
     
  7. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

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    Oct 24, 2013
    #7
    Really?? They have been in all the macs since 2013 and still haven't been adopted in almost any other makers computers especially not as standard.
     
  8. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #8
    If you buy a MacBook you're paying a huge premium to get the ultra thin & light design. In time, they'll probably evolve into the "entry level" Mac (that's what happened with the MacBook Air) but at the moment they're an expensive 'second computer' for people who continually carry their laptop around. Also, I wouldn't touch the MacBook as a "desktop replacement" until there's a better range of USB-C hubs and adapters.

    Entry-level is still the MacBook Air: no retina screen but you could pair it with a 4k display. However if you find yourself upgrading much from the base model, the 13" MacBook Pro gives far more bangs per buck (including the retina screen).

    My guess is that, come the next update, the Air and 13" rMBP lines will merge into something that fits more neatly between the MacBook and the 15" Pro. But that's just a guess and nobody knows when the next update will come.

    As for the Thunderbolt Display, it won't work with the MacBook at all - it needs an Air or a Pro. Even if you go Air/Pro, a 3rd party display plus a Thunderbolt "dock" would be better value (Or, I believe, a couple of the LG monitors have Thunderbolt, but the only practical upshot of that is that it can drive the USB ports in the display without needing a second cable).

    I'm guessing the Thunderbolt Display won't be replaced until Apple have rolled out Thunderbolt 3, which can drive a 5k display - or Apple might just get out of the display market given the number of 3rd party options.
     
  9. hanser macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2013
    #9
    I would just buy a Macbook Pro and add a standard external monitor and external HDD by other manufacturers which are much cheaper. Works for me perfectly.
     
  10. zhenya macrumors 603

    zhenya

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    #10
    I'll just point out that with the Apple digital display adapter, the MacBook actually works fantastically well as a desktop replacement if you don't need the sustained CPU performance of a desktop. Pair the adapter with a usb hub and a monitor (most people are not looking to connect 4k monitors yet) and you have a single point of connection for everything - something no other Apple computer can do today without third-party accessories that are still nowhere near as convenient (and generally require you to close the laptop, losing access to that screen).
     
  11. Kissaragi macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2006
    #11
    Hi amhsing, you dont need to buy an apple screen, you are right in saying they are a few years out of date. You will just need an adaptor and you can carry on using your current monitor if you wish. If you are buying the new macbook you will probably need a few adaptors for old style USB or any other connectors you use so factor that in to your pricing.

    Theres no real way around the storage problem other than using an external drive for files you dont need as often. With a wireless drive youd be able to access your content quite easily.

    Good luck with it
     
  12. Hirakata macrumors 6502

    Hirakata

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    Mar 17, 2011
    Location:
    Burbank, CA
    #12
    You use an external monitor and a wireless keyboard. You have an iPhone and iPad. Do you really need a laptop? Sounds to me like a desktop will solve most of your worries...
     
  13. theluggage macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    #13
    True, although a Thunderbolt hub comes close and wins in other ways - it won't supply power, but it will usually give you multiple USB ports, the choice of HDMI or MiniDisplayPort display connection and Ethernet, while still leaving 2 USB ports on your MBP/MBA.

    I'd still leave the MB until it is clear that USB-C is going to take off and things like this:
    http://9to5mac.com/2015/06/09/macbook-dock-usb-hdmi-ethernet-audio-sd/
    ...are actually in the shops.

    Possibly, USB-C will take off big time and 18 months down the line there will be a huge choice of accessories (and the other Macs will likely have sprouted USB-C), but after the amount of delays and vapourware we saw with Thunderbolt peripherals I'd be reluctant to take it for granted.
     
  14. amhsing thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    #14
    Thanks everyone. Quite a points and questions I hadn't thought. Still not exactly sure what I'll do but whatever it is it will be a better decision for your input.

    And its nice to be on a message board that stays constructive.
     
  15. joegraves macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    #15
    Have a look at the Hakintosh website which will tell you the models that best support Mac OS X, its fairly easy these days to install OS X on a standard PC with support for the essential things like graphics, sound, Wifi etc and all for a fraction of the price!
     
  16. cheesyappleuser macrumors 6502a

    cheesyappleuser

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Location:
    Portugal
    #16
    Considering what you've just said, it would be reasonable to purchase a 21.5" iMac, specially since a Retina model is likely to be released in this Fall.

    Even so, if you rather have a different setup, I'd rather consider to purchase a rMBP (probably the 13" 2.5/8/256 config is perfect for your usage) and a separate monitor. Dell's monitors are amazing, plentiful in features and much more reasonably priced than Apple's (outdated) offer. In this case you could either keep your keyboard, or shell out some $100-$150 more on what Apple has to offer.
     

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