Advice Just bought a new 15'' pro

marshallbedsaul

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 14, 2007
846
43
Maryland
Hello guys,
been forever since posting anything on here., but need advice.

As the title states I picked up a new base model 15'' touch bar pro. And I am back and forth on returning for the next model up.

my needs
photoshop
I make youtube video
multi task between the both
and play around with Xcode.

so question keep the base or upgrade.


my last MacBook Pro finally died after 9 years., was. base model 15''

thanks for the advice.
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,155
The base is a plenty capable computer. There is a pretty big difference between the various GPU models, but people using the base 15 with the 450 say nothing but great things about it. For your needs, I think the base will work great for years to come, in my personal opinion.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 603
Jan 26, 2014
5,042
2,945
Horsens, Denmark
The base is a plenty capable computer. There is a pretty big difference between the various GPU models, but people using the base 15 with the 450 say nothing but great things about it. For your needs, I think the base will work great for years to come, in my personal opinion.
Had he not said he came from a 9 year old model, I would disagree since video editing can be very taxing. When you chug 4-5 layers of colour correction on a clip alongside various other keyframed effects **** gets heavy for the system. But having worked on a nine year old computer... Our OP will feel like it's a 24 core Workstation Monster with W9100 in 4 way crossfire. 9 years is a long time

Hell, it's almost at when we started having Intel Macs.
 

darksithpro

macrumors 6502a
Oct 27, 2016
582
4,568
Prob wont get another 9 years, being that everything is soldered on. I'd max out everything I could afford.
 
Last edited:

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,155
Had he not said he came from a 9 year old model, I would disagree since video editing can be very taxing. When you chug 4-5 layers of colour correction on a clip alongside various other keyframed effects **** gets heavy for the system. But having worked on a nine year old computer... Our OP will feel like it's a 24 core Workstation Monster with W9100 in 4 way crossfire. 9 years is a long time

Hell, it's almost at when we started having Intel Macs.
I made an assumption I shouldn't have. I didn't realize that was the type of work implied by 'making YouTube videos' - I assumed it was more basic along the lines of what I do when I make a video for upload.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 603
Jan 26, 2014
5,042
2,945
Horsens, Denmark
soldiered on
Wicked computer if it's soldering!

I made an assumption I shouldn't have. I didn't realize that was the type of work implied by 'making YouTube videos' - I assumed it was more basic along the lines of what I do when I make a video for upload.
... Do I overproduce my YouTube video? Hehe. how much editing do you do? Just arrange the clips and cut them and then export or? And what app do you use for it? Final Cut? Premiere? DaVinci?
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,155
... Do I overproduce my YouTube video? Hehe. how much editing do you do? Just arrange the clips and cut them and then export or? And what app do you use for it? Final Cut? Premiere? DaVinci?
I'm pretty primitive here... :oops:

I use the trim feature in QuickTime and that, sometimes basic color correction, cropping, and noise reduction in iMovie followed by an export. Most of my videos are mainly amusing clips of the things my pets do when they think they aren't being watched,
 

casperes1996

macrumors 603
Jan 26, 2014
5,042
2,945
Horsens, Denmark
I use the trim feature in QuickTime and that, sometimes basic color correction, cropping, and noise reduction in iMovie followed by an export. Most of my videos are mainly amusing clips of the things my pets do when they think they aren't being watched,
You're golden with the base model, mate, haha. The mods here are pretty against promoting your own stuff (for good reasons), but I think if I ask for it myself its OK - Can I See your channel? I love cats.....
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,799
2,108
There isn't a lot of difference from the base model to the higher ones, assuming you don't require the extra drive space.

Had he not said he came from a 9 year old model, I would disagree since video editing can be very taxing. When you chug 4-5 layers of colour correction on a clip alongside various other keyframed effects **** gets heavy for the system. But having worked on a nine year old computer... Our OP will feel like it's a 24 core Workstation Monster with W9100 in 4 way crossfire. 9 years is a long time

Hell, it's almost at when we started having Intel Macs.
The upgrades are still very moderate, so they wouldn't necessarily eliminate the chugging.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 603
Jan 26, 2014
5,042
2,945
Horsens, Denmark
The upgrades are still very moderate, so they wouldn't necessarily eliminate the chugging.
Eliminate, highly doubtful. Minimise, yes.
And from the 450 to the 460 there's a fair jump. To the 455 there's less of a jump, but it's still, what? 15%? 20% That's a fair bit also I'd say. And obviously there's the drive capacity bump you mention. But if you don't use it, it's, well, useless. Though it should also be a wee bit faster - bigger SSDs usually are (up to a point at least). Though that's minimal. And the CPU isn't worth talking about when it's just 100 MHz. That's like 3-4% we're talking.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,799
2,108
Eliminate, highly doubtful. Minimise, yes.
And from the 450 to the 460 there's a fair jump. To the 455 there's less of a jump, but it's still, what? 15%? 20% That's a fair bit also I'd say. And obviously there's the drive capacity bump you mention. But if you don't use it, it's, well, useless. Though it should also be a wee bit faster - bigger SSDs usually are (up to a point at least). Though that's minimal. And the CPU isn't worth talking about when it's just 100 MHz. That's like 3-4% we're talking.
The difference in perceived usability is generally far less than the difference on paper. 15-20% gpu throughput for the use cases mentioned is probably not even distinguishable.
 

Mindinversion

macrumors 6502
Oct 9, 2008
357
129
For our OP - No. You're absolutely right
Not necessarily. A lot of it depends on things like Optimization [20% in Final Cut Pro would probably be a HUGELY noticeable improvement]. Premier, probably not so much.

It's all a bit relative. Not saying the 450 wouldn't work for O/P, but the additional improvement plus the 4Gb Vram in the 460 is a pretty substantial upgrade over stock.

Which then requires the question: How substantial are O/Ps video edits?

I'll openly admit I'm biased here, I LOVE the 460 :)
 

casperes1996

macrumors 603
Jan 26, 2014
5,042
2,945
Horsens, Denmark
Not necessarily. A lot of it depends on things like Optimization [20% in Final Cut Pro would probably be a HUGELY noticeable improvement]. Premier, probably not so much.

It's all a bit relative. Not saying the 450 wouldn't work for O/P, but the additional improvement plus the 4Gb Vram in the 460 is a pretty substantial upgrade over stock.

Which then requires the question: How substantial are O/Ps video edits?
Depends a lot what you do in Final Cut. With some projects I feel no difference from my R9 M295X/4790K iMac to my Iris Pro 15" MacBook Pro 4770HQ. And hardware wise they're worlds apart. Sometimes the difference is grand. The 460 is great, and if I had the cash and was in the market for a new one, I'd go with the best GPU possible. But I do a lot of GPU heavy work, and our OP already answered your last question there.

I use the trim feature in QuickTime and that, sometimes basic color correction, cropping, and noise reduction in iMovie followed by an export. Most of my videos are mainly amusing clips of the things my pets do when they think they aren't being watched,
So yeah. I think the 450 is perfect for the OP. Won't you agree?
 

SteveJUAE

macrumors 68040
Aug 14, 2015
3,277
3,366
Land of Smiles
OP assuming your current workflow etc has been on your 9 year old model then your already possibly over spec' ing :) as it's a huge upgrade to what your use to.

Presumable 15" is your preferred footprint else any of the current MAC's would be noticeably better

Given the current trend in CPU upgrades etc it's unlikely you will see the same magnitude of upgrades in the foreseeable to what's occurred over the last 9 years. So maxing out now may seem a good reason towards some form of future proofing if your looking for the same longevity.

Given your patience with a 9 year laptop is the modest boost vs cost delta of the current max spec over base worth it to you is a tough call

I would also question if you are going to be so lucky with the longevity of the new MBP and it's much higher repair costs due to construction methods. This could be offset in part now buy sticking with the base model over the max.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,799
2,108
Not necessarily. A lot of it depends on things like Optimization [20% in Final Cut Pro would probably be a HUGELY noticeable improvement]. Premier, probably not so much.

It's all a bit relative. Not saying the 450 wouldn't work for O/P, but the additional improvement plus the 4Gb Vram in the 460 is a pretty substantial upgrade over stock.

Which then requires the question: How substantial are O/Ps video edits?

I'll openly admit I'm biased here, I LOVE the 460 :)
It depends on the source of those numbers. If it measures anything other than general computation, it may not be relevant at all. In general I tend to view suggestions to max things out as terrible advice, because most of the time these people suggest upgrades that would not grant even one extra cycle of use prior to the next upgrade. Generally if the upgrade cycle is whenever the current one dies, that implies that small minor performance differences are of little value and may not ever be perceived.

@SteveJUAE, the cost of battery service may go up. If there's a lack of user inflicted damage, you can count on depot repair for anything else prior to the machine hitting vintage status, at which point Apple may no longer offer service. Depot repair is $350. It always has been. It will be on this one too. Also upgrades are a terrible waste of money, and they're less useful if you can get away with using the same thing for 9 years. The one exception to this is drive size, because SSDs scaled back available storage space. In general upgrades benefit Apple's bottom line more than they benefit you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Coco Nuts

SteveJUAE

macrumors 68040
Aug 14, 2015
3,277
3,366
Land of Smiles
It depends on the source of those numbers. If it measures anything other than general computation, it may not be relevant at all. In general I tend to view suggestions to max things out as terrible advice, because most of the time these people suggest upgrades that would not grant even one extra cycle of use prior to the next upgrade. Generally if the upgrade cycle is whenever the current one dies, that implies that small minor performance differences are of little value and may not ever be perceived.

@SteveJUAE, the cost of battery service may go up. If there's a lack of user inflicted damage, you can count on depot repair for anything else prior to the machine hitting vintage status, at which point Apple may no longer offer service. Depot repair is $350. It always has been. It will be on this one too. Also upgrades are a terrible waste of money, and they're less useful if you can get away with using the same thing for 9 years. The one exception to this is drive size, because SSDs scaled back available storage space. In general upgrades benefit Apple's bottom line more than they benefit you.
Thanks for the info re batteries :) I agree I would never recommend post upgrades via Apple there are plenty more alternative storage options now 9 years on for the OP :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: thekev

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,799
2,108
Thanks for the info re batteries :) I agree I would never recommend post upgrades via Apple there are plenty more alternative storage options now 9 years on for the OP :)
Yeah I don't know if they'll increase again this round. Battery replacements are expensive. On a 2011 17", it was $179. I think the 15" models may have been $20 less. The retina 15" models have been $200. The newest ones may be more, but depot repair (fix anything that has failed) has been around $350 at least since the early 2000s.
 

Chupa Chupa

macrumors G5
Jul 16, 2002
14,834
7,394
I'm inferring you are a hobbyist, not pro, user based on your statement that you held your last computer for 9 years. Based on that not only the base fine for your needs but upgrading would be overkill and money in the trash can. The extra power and speed gained by upgrading can only be justified if you are being paid to spit out videos or graphics. In that case the 10% extra speed starts to add up to real money in short time and the upgrade is more than paid for.

Also, the base model is no slouch.
 

ZapNZs

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2017
2,310
1,155
You're golden with the base model, mate, haha. The mods here are pretty against promoting your own stuff (for good reasons), but I think if I ask for it myself its OK - Can I See your channel? I love cats.....
I've got mainly bunny. PM inbound
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.