Advice: Scanning Old Pictures to Mac?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ironjaw, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. ironjaw macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 23, 2006
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    Cold Copenhagen
    #1
    Hi All,

    I've got some old photo albums lying around and before the originals fade with time I have decided to scan them to my Mac and store them in iPhoto.

    1. Any advice on what's the best scanner and scanning resolution

    2. Any good application I should look at?

    Cheers
     
  2. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #2
    To get the highest quality I would consider outsourcing your scanning to someone... they'll have all the highest end equipment, which you won't want to buy for such a small project.

    -T
     
  3. ironjaw thread starter macrumors 6502

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    May 23, 2006
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    Cold Copenhagen
    #3
    That's a good idea, I will go and see what the prices are
     
  4. Heb1228 macrumors 68020

    Heb1228

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Location:
    Virginia Beach, VA
    #4
    You can get great quality scans from many scanners these days. I did the same thing you're talking about with my Epson RX500 (all-in-one). Did prints and slides and Epson's hardware photo restore capabilities were great for 20-year old slides. The biggest drawback was the time it took, but the results were perfectly acceptable as far as the quality of the scans.

    Just don't skimp and buy a cheap scanner, something mid-range will do much better.
     
  5. Jovian9 macrumors 68000

    Jovian9

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    Location:
    Planet Zebes
    #5
    The Epson Perfection 4490 Photo Scanner is a very good scanner at a reasonable price. We used these in my last photography course to scan color and b&w negatives, as well as 3X5 prints, and slides. I then printed 8X10's out of the scans. Though I did use Photoshop to color balance/touch up/etc.

    Before I quit using the scanner I took some negatives that I had from 16 years ago when I went to Washington D.C. and made prints from them. They turned out great even though I had never taken care of them.
     
  6. ScubaDuc macrumors 6502

    ScubaDuc

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Location:
    Europe
    #6
    I've gone with the Nikon Coolscan V and I am very happy with it. There are some issues with scanning negatives including scratches and color saturation. The Nikon touches up during the scanning process saving a lot of photoshop time
     
  7. netdog macrumors 603

    netdog

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    Location:
    London
    #7
    What resolution is best to use? How much resolution is actually in even a good print to be captured and useful in printing? (assuming that cropping and enlarging may be desirable where possible).
     
  8. termina3 macrumors 65816

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    #8
    Highest possible.
     
  9. mahonmeister macrumors 6502

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    Jun 9, 2006
    Location:
    Redlands, CA
    #9
    I'm trying to do the same thing. The biggest obstacle is the tedious process of scanning on a flatbed. I've been trying to find a photo feeder scanner that automates the process but I keep finding old products or really expensive ones.

    Anyone know of a good quality scanner with a photo feeder for less then $250? Something like this: http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,115427-page,1/article.html (that one is from 2004)

    I've read so many stories on various forums about how some poor soul spends months scanning all their old photos manually one at a time. Come on now, where is the automation?

    I'm not trying to hijack this thread, so I'll add some advice too.
    -Any resolution above 300dpi is good. The higher it is, the slower the scan and larger the file. I've read that saving as a .tiff file is best because it uses loss-less compression unlike jpeg. Burn the images to a dvd and then import/convert them to a jpeg so that they don't fill up your hard drive. That way you will always have the original scan backed-up. Make 2 copies if you really want to be secure.
    -Scan the negatives if possible. Then will have higher quality then the printed photo. There are scanner attachments for this purpose.
    -Backup your data often!
    -As for the software application, most scanners come with their own. I need to do a little more research to find a better alternative.
     
  10. ironjaw thread starter macrumors 6502

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    May 23, 2006
    Location:
    Cold Copenhagen
    #10
    mahonmeister - That's great advice, I still have not found a good scanner - What I do have is multifunction HP2840 Laserjet printer [link]. It has a good scanner at 1200 x 1200 dpi and prints at Up to 600 x 600 dpi but I'm still convinced that a dedicated scanner with possibility of scanning negatives is the way to go.

    Other than that I have been seduced by those midrange HP-all-in-one inkjet printers like the HP Photosmart C8180 All-in-One [link]with high scanning resolution and good printing quality, but I'm still not sure what's best...:confused:
     
  11. -hh macrumors 68020

    -hh

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    NJ Highlands, Earth
    #11
    As a temporary measure,

    Plop down the album, open a page & take a photo of it with your current digital camera.

    It won't be great resolution, but it prevents procrastination of never getting around to doing anything.


    -hh
     

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