Aftermarket Heatsink for 13" airs?

Discussion in 'MacBook Air' started by PCPacMac, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. PCPacMac macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    #1
    After examining the Macbook air 13's heatsink on both the 2010 and 2011 models, it seems to me there is space for a better heatsink design. A heatsink with more surface area even at the expense of being slightly heavier would benefit all of us by keepin these chips operating at cooler temperatures while minimizing fan noise. Also, it looks like more expensive fan options exist that flow more air with better pressure ratios.

    I would be happy to pay for one that cools the cpu/gpu better than the current flat aluminum design too So, has anyone tried building a better heatsink solution?
     
  2. oneMadRssn macrumors 68040

    oneMadRssn

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #2
    Just because there is room available, does not mean that filling that room with more aluminum or copper would necessarily make it better. It might impede airflow to other chips which don't have heatsinks on them but still need fresh air to stay cool enough.
     
  3. TheRealDamager macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2011
    #3
    That would be a very risky venture. I seriously doubt someone would be able to dramatically improve on the current design and put together a package that would be affordable and easy enough to install.
     
  4. philxor macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2010
    #4
    I usually am one to never say never, but I will say right now you will never see another heatsink/fan option for the MBA. I've taken the MBA apart completely in replacing a bent bottom case and I'll say the heatsink and fan isn't a trivial replacement and it's designed the way it is for a reason, and certainly operates fine for just about everyone who has a reasonable expectation for the lifetime of the computer.
     
  5. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #5
    You don't need to do anything to your Mac, as it already has a cooling system that keeps temperatures within a safe operating range. You don't need to make hardware or software modifications. Rather than attempting to redesign the MBA, you're better off just using it. It's quite likely that Apple engineers know a bit more about proper design than you do.
     
  6. lolwut89 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    #6
    Apple build products for the end consumer to use, not to tinker/modify them. Honestly, if you were thinking about tinkering with the cooling system of the Macbook Air, why even get one in the first place?

    I returned my MBA, but when running simple games like monopoly it ran as high as 95C with the fan running at max. If apple thinks that's okay I'm sure you'll be fine. It's not like Apple would build these poorly (but it has happened in the past) only to issue recall notices for fixes.
     
  7. PCPacMac thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2012
    #7
    You'd be surprised at how much "cost cutting" gets factored into designs during the development process ;).
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    While cost and price aren't always closely linked, considering the prices of Macs compared to other notebooks, it doesn't look like a lot of "cost cutting" is going on.
     
  9. throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #9
    Is that why no one in PC land is having problems putting out a macbook air competitor at a similar price?

    ohwaitasec...


    Not saying the MBA is "cheaply" made, but apple have been very shrewd to cut costs where possible without turning out a piece of junk...
     

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