Airport Base Station-Do g devices slow it down? Parental Controls

markw10

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 4, 2006
372
0
I need to purchase a new Wi-Fi router and am looking at several but am looking at the Airport Base Station.
Most of my devices such as my Mac's all use N networking but other devices such as my Xbox 360 use g networking. When doing research on the Airport Base Station I read that when you connect G devices to the Airport Base Station it will slow down the entire network to G speed so that all your N devices really only get G speed.
Is this still an issue? Does the newer version of the Airport Base Station still do this? Has there been a firmware or hardware upgrade that solves this issue?
Also, when it comes to parental controls, does the AEBS have good parental controls? What I'm most interested in is being able to block specific websites such as Facebook so that all devices connected to the network would not be able to access Facebook. When I read up on the AEBS it appears to have some parental controls but you can't block specific websites. Is this true?

Another router I'm looking at is the Cisco Linksys E2000. A friend of mine has a E1000 and loves it. When doing research I became interested in the E2000 since it has gigabit ports.
Would g devices slow down all n devices connected to it though? What I'm wondering is if the issue with g devices is related to the AEBS or all n routers. What I like it is seems the E1000/E2000 has great parental controls for website blocking.
Thank you for your help.
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,420
759
http://www.apple.com/airportextreme/features/frequency.html
Simultaneous dual-band support.
Some Wi-Fi devices use the 2.4GHz wireless band, including iPhone, iPod touch, and devices using 802.11b/g. Other devices can use either 2.4GHz or the higher-speed 5GHz band, such as the latest 802.11n-based Mac computers and Apple TV. Instead of choosing one of the bands, AirPort Extreme operates simultaneously on both bands, and your multiband devices automatically use the best available band. This means all your Wi-Fi devices get the fastest possible wireless performance and the best possible range. In addition, AirPort Extreme reduces the possibility of interference from appliances and cordless phones that use the 2.4GHz band.
 

waw74

macrumors 68040
May 27, 2008
3,243
235
keep in mind that not all N devices are equal. You can run N on 2 frequencies, 2.4 & 5 GHz. For fastest speeds you need to use 5, BUT... 5 is blocked more by walls other obstacles than 2.4 is.
the iPhone4, while it is N, it only has 2.4, so you need to check your individual devices.

N (B/G compatible) is running at 2.4 GHz. connecting a G device will slow your N devices down, but not necessarily to G speeds.

to keep full speeds you ideally want a simultaneous dual band unit (like the e3000) (the 1000 and 2000 are not simultaneous)

If all you are doing is Web stuff, you probably won't see any increase in speeds from G to N, the speed differences you will see are internal transfers from one computer to another on your network.
 

markw10

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 4, 2006
372
0
Thank you for your reply. Just to make sure I'm correct does simultaneous and dual band mean that it runs 2.4 and 5 Ghz at the same time or that it does g and n at the same time. I did more research and it seems there are not many dual band routers but there are even fewer simultaneous dual band routers. The Linksys E3000 is one that seems very nice and a possible one I may look at.
I have a question about the Airport Extreme Base Station. If I read correctly it appears there are 2-3 versions of the current design out. I know one of them did not have gigabit ethernet books on the back but when i did more research it appears not all versions of the Airport Extreme Base Station are simultaneous dual band. Is this true? I may be searching for a AEBS on eBay. how can I tell which version I'm looking at. Is there a model # or some other way to find out which of the versions it is and if it's simultaneous dual band or not?
 

GGJstudios

macrumors Westmere
May 16, 2008
44,420
759
Thank you for your reply. Just to make sure I'm correct does simultaneous and dual band mean that it runs 2.4 and 5 Ghz at the same time or that it does g and n at the same time.
The specs are here: http://www.apple.com/airportextreme/specs.html
I have a question about the Airport Extreme Base Station. If I read correctly it appears there are 2-3 versions of the current design out. I know one of them did not have gigabit ethernet books on the back but when i did more research it appears not all versions of the Airport Extreme Base Station are simultaneous dual band. Is this true? I may be searching for a AEBS on eBay. how can I tell which version I'm looking at. Is there a model # or some other way to find out which of the versions it is and if it's simultaneous dual band or not?
Only the most current version, introduced in March 2009, supports simultaneous dual band.
You can find specs, including model numbers, on all Apple products with Mactracker.
 

DaveTheRave

macrumors 6502a
May 22, 2003
599
171
keep in mind that not all N devices are equal. You can run N on 2 frequencies, 2.4 & 5 GHz. For fastest speeds you need to use 5, BUT... 5 is blocked more by walls other obstacles than 2.4 is.
the iPhone4, while it is N, it only has 2.4, so you need to check your individual devices.

N (B/G compatible) is running at 2.4 GHz. connecting a G device will slow your N devices down, but not necessarily to G speeds.

to keep full speeds you ideally want a simultaneous dual band unit (like the e3000) (the 1000 and 2000 are not simultaneous)

If all you are doing is Web stuff, you probably won't see any increase in speeds from G to N, the speed differences you will see are internal transfers from one computer to another on your network.
While all of this is true, I would just buy the router anyway even if you can't take full advantage of all the frequencies/features. Eventually you will get a new computer or other wifi-enabled device. Anything you buy now that's brand new should have wireless-N and hopefully be able to use both 2.4 and 5 Ghz frequencies. If you only buy a g router eventually you'll want to upgrade, so why not do it now?