Airport Express for dorm room?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by HerrRolf, Aug 4, 2008.

  1. HerrRolf macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2008
    #1
    I'm thinking about getting the Airport Express to use at the dorm. Will I notice any speed increase using this as compared to a 802.11g router? Or does it depend on the internet provided by the uni?

    I guess I'm confused as to how wireless networks work. If the hardwire hardwire, ethernet speed is say 60 Mbps, then the 100 Mbps capability of the AE would be pretty worthless, right?
     
  2. fr4c macrumors 65816

    fr4c

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Location:
    Hamster wheel
    #2
    Definitely depends on the network at school. I can guarantee you the dorm rooms will be capped in network speed in one form or the other.
     
  3. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #3
    My dorm rooms were not capped, so my N-router was great. Yes a AEBS is great for a dorm room.
     
  4. jsm4182 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2006
    Location:
    Beacon, NY
    #4
    Most schools won't let students use their own wireless routers. You should check with your school's IT department before buying any wireless router.
     
  5. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #5
    Yeah, well just don't broadcast… :D
     
  6. fr4c macrumors 65816

    fr4c

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2007
    Location:
    Hamster wheel
    #6
    University network regulations usually involves the student registering the MAC address of their computer to their school's network. This way the school can track student activity (such as illegal downloading, etc.), and also monitor network usage. Most universities limit how much a student can upload/download per week, month, etc. to control bandwidth usage. The limit ensures that there is always enough bandwidth for everyone to share. Dorm users account for approximately 15% of the computer population at most universities. That 15% is responsible for about 50% of the school's total traffic, even with the bandwidth limits in place. If there were no limits, not only would the university have no bandwidth for anything else, but dorm connections would also slow to a crawl.

    For example a typical bandwidth limit would be 4GB down / 2MB up per week. If the student were to go over their bandwidth, they usually have their connection turned off for a few days. University IT departments don't support routers because they are not responsible for multiple computers/users on one network line. So lets say you have a wireless network setup on your dorm line and other people decide to hop on and use it, they in turn use up your weekly bandwidth.

    Also, I have seen many students mess up the network for an entire floor because they install their routers backwards and start assigning IP addresses to the entire floor and conflicting with university switches.
     
  7. portent macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    #7
    Skip the wireless router

    You probably wont need a wireless router at all, because your dorm room is probably going to be so small that you won't be moving your laptop from your desk. ;)

    Even if you did want one, you probably won't be allowed to have one. Most universities ban the use of wireless routers on their dorm networks, because if every student had one, the interference would be so bad that nobody's would work. Too many networks in too small a space.
     
  8. myiope macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2008
    #8
    The difference between g and n routers will only be seen by your computer's connection to the router. Beyond that point, the router's connection to the school's network will be hardwired ethernet (most likely) and not wireless. For dorm rooms, the size is pretty small so you don't need much range. In fact, unless you move your computer around inside the room or have more than 1 computer there (why?), there is no need for a router. I would recommend keeping your existing g router if you want to use one in the dorm if its main purpose is for allowing multiple computers to access the Internet. Using a 5GHz band for n might be useful to avoid interference and if you need to transfer big files often between your own computers.
     
  9. ham128 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    #9
    Airport in dorms

    I just bought an Airport express and plan on using it in my dorm room, did you have to go through any tedious processes to get it to work, or did you just plug it in to the Ethernet port and go...

    I just am wondering if my AE will work at all.


    15" Macbook Pro 2.4 - 2GB
     

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