All in one printer (scanner) versus dedicated scanner?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by waloshin, Dec 23, 2014.

  1. waloshin macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    Oct 9, 2008
    #1
    I am curious is a dedicated scanner such as the Epson Perfection V550 will produce better color accuary and details when compared to a all in one printer with a scanner?
     
  2. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

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    #2
    You have to evaluate this on a model-by-model basis. There's no inherent reason for a dedicated scanner to be "better" than an all-in-one. There's one basic rule of thumb - a $200 all-in-one isn't likely to deliver the same quality as a $200 dedicated scanner.

    The model you mention happens to have better scanning specs than Epson's all-in-ones. However, the cheaper dedicated scanners in the Epson product line are comparable to some of their all-in-ones.

    There is the question as to whether your personal requirements demand that kind of quality. Considering all the ways color can be inaccurately rendered during the photographic process (do you calibrate your monitor and printer?), it may not be necessary to spend extra on accuracy. (And if you have to ask this question at all, it suggests that you don't need that kind of accuracy - people who have to deliver highly-accurate graphics in fields like print publishing and science already know what to look for on the spec sheet.)
     
  3. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    Oct 9, 2008
    #3
    Thanks for the reply.

    Is there anyway to force the V550 to scan Digital Ice for pictures like the V600?
     
  4. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68020

    Ulenspiegel

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    #4
  5. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #5
  6. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68020

    Ulenspiegel

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    #6
    I see, thanks for clarifying. :)
     
  7. waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    Oct 9, 2008
    #7
    The reason why I wonder if other than that the scanners are identical. I just bought the V550 for $119 on sale and the V600 is still selling for $229 so inwoukd rather keep the V550 and be able to scan images with DI too.
     
  8. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68020

    Ulenspiegel

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    #8
    I can understand your dilemma. Most probably I would keep the V550 too as the price difference is considerable.
     
  9. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

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    #9
    then the V550 probably doesn't have the necessary infrared lamp set up for the whole flatbed but just for the film scanner
     
  10. SpicyWings, Jan 5, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2015

    SpicyWings macrumors newbie

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    Dec 30, 2014
    #10
    The question is what do you plan to scan, and how much detail do you really need. You need huge TIFF files only if you plan to use them for sophisticated image editing. You need 1200 PPI scans (or higher) only if you need to make poster sized reprints. For most practical purposes, 300 PPI is good enough.

    Apart from scan resolution and image fidelity, scanner functions also differ. e.g. document feeder tray, ability to scan film negatives, or to scan multiple photos simultaneously and automatically crop / save as individual JPGs, scan multiple page documents and save them as a single PDF file, automatic edge detection and perspective correction etc. etc.

    In addition to a hardware scanner, also try out document and photo scanner apps. These are great for any time / anywhere scanning. Document scanner apps are good for digitizing receipts, expense claims, bound documents etc.
     
  11. waloshin, Jan 10, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2015

    waloshin thread starter macrumors 68040

    waloshin

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    #11
    I would mainly be scanning reflective photos and either enlarging them or re printing them. So I want as much detail as I can get. The beat color.accuracy I can get and the sharpest picture I can get.

    If I want to enlarge wallet sized photos to 8x10 wouldn't I need at least a 1200 DPI scan?

    Thanks
     
  12. SpicyWings macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2014
    #12
    Let's first see how many pixels you need to make a decent quality print. I'll say 180 DPI is the minimum, 300 DPI very good.

    Note that it's dots per inch (DPI) when we talk about printing, and pixels per inch (PPI) when we talk about scanning;) but here let's take each printer dot as 1 square pixel. So 8x10 means 8 x 10 x 300 x 300 = 7,200,000 or 7.2 MP should be the size of your scanned file.

    Not sure what exactly is wallet size, but assuming 2.5 x 3.5, divide 7,200,000 by (2.5 x 3.5) then take square root - and you get 900 PPI
     

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