ALL LCD Monitors Have "Some" Backlight Bleeding

Discussion in 'iPad' started by vrDrew, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. vrDrew macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
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    Midlife, Midwest
    #1
    Backlight bleeding is present to a certain extent on every LCD display panel. The nature of the display is such that, with power to the monitor the backlight is on, and the job of the LCD pixels is to block it out. Which they do imperfectly because the metal framework that supports the panel in these areas causes a tiny fluctuation in the voltage applied to the LCD pixels in those areas.

    Try the following test: Use paint or Photoshop to create a fullscreen size totally black image. Use a picture viewer to view it fullscreen, and look at it in a totally dark room. It doesn't matter what brand or model of LCD monitor you use, there will be at least *some* bleeding of light at the edges and corners.

    I tried this with the desktop LG monitor I've been extremely happy with for the past two years. Gaming, word processing, surfing the web, image editing - never noticed a problem. But sure enough, when I did the test, there was a noticeable light pattern around the edges.

    Bottom line: Some backlight bleeding is inevitable. But before you fall victim to another internet forum inspired panic-fest, take a minute to consider the way you REALLY use your iPad. (Hint - looking at a totally black screen in a dark room isn't a very common activity.)
     

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  2. biscuitdunker macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    #2
    yes looking at a totally black screen isnt normal but watching a black letterboxed movie in bed is. Never noticed any extensive bleed in that situation with ipad1
     
  3. VidPro macrumors 6502a

    VidPro

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2011
    #3
    My cheap Sony and Dell monitors do not have bleeding. Deep blacks they do not have but I don't expect that from LCD.
     
  4. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #4
    Most "cheep" LCD's use CCFL backlighting which is more uniform. There are basically 3 types of LCD backlights.

    1. CCFL Much like a florescent light behind the display. (big compared to LED's, with limited life)

    2. LED backlight. (LED's behind the screen, more uniform light but thicker).

    3. LED edgelight. (LED's located on the edges, less uniform but can be MUCH thinner.)

    The iPad (like the thinnest HDTV's) use #3. It's a compromise on light evenness and bleed but allows the device to be ultra thin.
     
  5. ThatsMeRight macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    #5
    It uses 2. And that is according to Apple's website.

    Fact is that, usually, if there's any backlight bleeding it's not that intensive as on the iPad 2. My iPad 1 has no backlight bleeding, and most LCD screens don't. YOu are trying to talk things good, but iPad 2 has backlight bleeding and it should not have it. I have read that some 1st gen iPads had backlight bleeding as well, but that are just some iPads. Not 95/100 ipads.
     
  6. markyr17 macrumors 65816

    markyr17

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    Apr 8, 2010
    #6
    My iPhone 4 has absolutely no visible backlight bleeding.
     
  7. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #7
    It's edgelight. Edgelighting is a type (variation) of backlighting and Apple is just using the generic (not technical) term.

    If the LED's were behind the screen the iPad would have to be much thicker.
     
  8. vincenz macrumors 601

    vincenz

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2008
    #8
    If you see the light, it's bleeding. It's that simple. No use in trying to convince yourself of otherwise.
     
  9. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #9
    Actually placebo/beliefs/truths are far more powerful than facts to us all. If you believe/perceive something is real/true it IS real/true to you no matter what the facts are.;) So unfortunately it's not that simple.
     
  10. cmvsm macrumors 6502a

    cmvsm

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    #10
    No, it uses edge lit. They are using the term backlit as a general term. Doesn't take a genius to see this by the way the lights are placed on the outer rim of the device. Using the array method would not produce this effect, nor would the iPad be able to be so thin.

    First gen iPads had backlight bleeding as well. You can do a search and find PLENTY of examples. Funny you use the internet as a reference to try and prove a point with the iPad 2, but forget the iPad 1 with the same reference. And where is your 95/100 statistic coming from as it actually should be 100/100, but since you like to throw baseless statistics around, please proceed.
     
  11. VidPro macrumors 6502a

    VidPro

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    Mar 16, 2011

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