All running processes - which are useful/unuseful

XPcentric

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Oct 16, 2008
271
0
switching from windows, the easiers way is to give example the very known guide for windows optimization in which many processes can be disabled in task manager, very easy. How about OSX, is there a guide some un needed processes can be disabled ?

I have attached All running processes, and sincerely not sure all of them need to be running. for examle: qmgr (run by _postfix user), or prl_disp_service, hp event..


List:

Activity Monitor
AirPort Base Station Agent
AppCleaner Daemo
AppleSpell.service
ATSServer
autofsd
blued
configd
coreaudiod
coreservicesd
cron
cupsd
DirectoryService
diskarbitrationd
distnoted
Dock
dynarnic_pager
Finder
fseventsd
hidd
HP Event Handler
HPIOTrap Monito
hpusbmond
iStatMenusProces
kernel_task
KernelEventAgent kextd
launchd
launchd
Little Snitch Network
Monitor
Little Snitch UlAgent
loginwindow
lsd
master
mDNSResponder
mds
md worker
md worker
notifyd
ntpd
pboard
pmTool
pomodoro
postfixLauncher
prl_disp_service
prl_naptd
qmgr
Safari
screen capture
sh
socketfilterfw
Spotlight
Surplus Meter Agent
syslogd
System Starter
System UI Server
update
usbmuxd
UserEventAgent
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,883
372
Inside
Mac OS X is radically different then Windows when it comes to process handling and loading. There are a very few that can be safely turned off. If you start going through Activity Monitor quitting things you could make your system very unstable and most of the things just reappear within seconds.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
65,505
31,547
Boston
Unlike windows that has some services that are running that are not needed, OSX has services that you do need. I'd not worry about how OSX is working, in so much that its quite efficient.
 

smithrh

macrumors 68020
Feb 28, 2009
2,473
880
Unlike windows that has some services that are running that are not needed, OSX has services that you do need. I'd not worry about how OSX is working, in so much that its quite efficient.
I agree - OSX runs things you need, leave them be. Note, I have experience with XP as that's what I run at work and on my gaming machine.

The one exception I might grant here is the HP software on the Mac, it's bloatware. If the OP is experiencing some sort of performance issues, I'd look there first. Heck, you generally don't even need to install the HP software, everything is already there as far as drivers go.