Allowing ALL Downloads ?

Robert4

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 20, 2012
462
16
Hello,

I have been opening up, or trying to, several programs that I know
are safe, but my Mac (Mojave) doesn't.

Keep getting msgs like the following for a program called gqrx::

Gqrx” can’t be opened because the identity of the developer cannot be confirmed.
“gqrx” can’t be opened because it is from an unidentified developer.

Driving me crazy.

I went to the System Preferences/Safety and Security, but just don't see any option
that would allow ALL, uncensored by the Mac, downloads to be allowed.

I will accept the responsibility for.

How do I do this, please ? Step by step would be great.

Thanks, as always. Appreciate th e help,
Bob
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
19,402
6,710
I guarantee that the following will fix your problem:

1. Open terminal
2. Copy and paste the following command into terminal:
sudo spctl --master-disable
3. Enter your password when required (you will not see it being typed)

Now open "security and privacy" pref pane (system preferences)
In "general", see the "new option"? It's called "anywhere".

Now ANY app you download will open.
BUT ... BE AWARE... you are over-riding gatekeeper's "protections" and you could download and run a malicious app, as well.

Personal experience:
I've ALWAYS disabled gatekeeper immediately, and I've never had problems after doing so...
 
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Robert4

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 20, 2012
462
16
Hi,

Quick thanks for help.

As always, much appreciated.

Bob
 

chrfr

macrumors G3
Jul 11, 2009
9,548
3,433
Hi,

Quick thanks for help.

As always, much appreciated.

Bob
Don't disable Gatekeeper, that's very bad advice. You can open unsigned apps as necessary by right clicking (or control-clicking) and selecting the "Open" option. This will only happen once per unsigned application.
 

Fishrrman

macrumors Core
Feb 20, 2009
19,402
6,710
chrfr wrote:
"Don't disable Gatekeeper, that's very bad advice. You can open unsigned apps as necessary by right clicking (or control-clicking) and selecting the "Open" option. This will only happen once per unsigned application."

Tell me, WHY is it "bad advice"?
Macs ran great for decades without being locked out of opening "unsigned" applications.
And... in any case... the user can open them ANYWAY by doing what you described above.

All Gatekeeper actually does is prevent the clueless (by that I mean those who don't know how to "go around it") user from opening a non-signed app. But if one chooses the route you described above, one is as vulnerable as if one had simply used the terminal command I posted in reply 2 above.

Recall that until a few iterations ago, the "Security and Privacy" pane HAD THE "ANYWHERE" BUTTON IN PLAIN SIGHT. All you had to do was click the lock and access it.

Apple has chosen to hide it from the user. Another great Jony Ive idea.
Glad that he's now gone.
 

chrfr

macrumors G3
Jul 11, 2009
9,548
3,433
chrfr wrote:
"Don't disable Gatekeeper, that's very bad advice. You can open unsigned apps as necessary by right clicking (or control-clicking) and selecting the "Open" option. This will only happen once per unsigned application."

Tell me, WHY is it "bad advice"?
Macs ran great for decades without being locked out of opening "unsigned" applications.
And... in any case... the user can open them ANYWAY by doing what you described above.

All Gatekeeper actually does is prevent the clueless (by that I mean those who don't know how to "go around it") user from opening a non-signed app. But if one chooses the route you described above, one is as vulnerable as if one had simply used the terminal command I posted in reply 2 above.

Recall that until a few iterations ago, the "Security and Privacy" pane HAD THE "ANYWHERE" BUTTON IN PLAIN SIGHT. All you had to do was click the lock and access it.

Apple has chosen to hide it from the user. Another great Jony Ive idea.
Glad that he's now gone.
Its bad advice because it turns off one of the means that Apple offers to prevent malware. "Preventing the clueless user... from opening a non-signed app" is a valuable tool. We're not in an era where malware doesn't exist and it's not 20 years ago; computers and operating systems now aren't the same as then. Your own post even explains why it's a bad idea. I'm not sure why you're asking me.
 
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