Altitude issues?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by arsimoun, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. arsimoun macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #1
    I live at sea level (California) and will be traveling to 10,000 feet or so (Colorado mountains) to do some work. Are there any possible issues the altitude might bring up in my Retina Display circa 2012 MacBook Pro?

    Thanks much for the help!

    Adam Rodman
     
  2. heisenberg123 macrumors 603

    heisenberg123

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Location:
    Hamilton, Ontario
    #2
    no sir, the folks in Aspen get the same Macs as those in San Diego
     
  3. arsimoun thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #3
    Altitude Issues...

    Here's why I was concerned. If I have a fountain pen at sea level and go into pressurized cabin of an airplane as it flies up to 30,000 feet I can pretty much guarantee you that I will have a pocket full of ink as the liquid of the ink expands. I know LCD displays aren't "liquid" in the same way, but I found myself wondering if it might be an issue. Probably, I just need to get a life.

    Adam
     
  4. snoylekim macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2011
    #4
    Tech specs ...

    Operating altitude: tested up to 10,000 feet
    Maximum storage altitude: 15,000 feet
    Maximum shipping altitude: 35,000 feet


    The retina is SSD versus spinning platters . Spinners can have issues with high altitude operations ( there are special high altitude hard drives available) . The LED/LCD should be fine; Plasma gets Altitude effects .

    Just don't hit that 10,001 foot mark or else !! :)
     
  5. arsimoun thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #5
    Thanks. I pretty much knew I was being paranoid, but it's still nice to hear.

    Adam
     
  6. Rich.Cohen macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #6
    The problem with pens isn't the liquid, but the air trapped with it. If you had a container completely full of liquid (not carbonated) and you opened it at altitude, there would be no problem. If the container were half full and you opened it with the top down, most of the liquid would squirt out. That's what happens with you pen. The trapped air on top of the ink forces the ink out. Most ballpoints don't have this problem because there is no trapped air. In the 1960's NASA invented a ballpoint for astronauts with a built-in piston and trapped air above it to force the ink out because there was no gravity to do the work.

    I'm a pilot. Once on a business trip with my wife in our plane we took a thermos of ice-cream along to enjoy in flight. Unfortunately, when I packed the ice-cream I left a pocket of air at the bottom. When I started to open the thermos at 10,000 feet (pressure altitude - an airliner at 30,000 feet has a pressure altitude of about 8,000 feet) the ice-cream started oozing out. I should have take the top off completely and allowed the air to escape. Instead, I froze and ended up with a lap full of half melted ice-cream. My wife had to play autopilot while I cleaned up my mess.

    I should note that sea level air almost doubles in volume at 10,000 feet.
     
  7. lostgear macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    #7
    Sorry Adam, but liquids are incompressible or un expandable , sheeeesh what do they teach you at school!!!!:D

    It is the air in the empty part of the cartridge that expands due to the reduction in pressure. Try keeping the pen nib pointing upwards for the climb out.
     
  8. arsimoun thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #8
    Liberal arts major. Sorry. :)

    Adam Rodman
     

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