Am I too Picky with Apps?

Discussion in 'iPad Apps' started by puma1552, Nov 8, 2014.

  1. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #1
    -Free apps? Won't consider, hate ads in my apps
    -In app purchases? Hate having to continually make additional purchases to get the full features of the app, won't buy
    -Games? Have a console for that

    Seems like 99%'of what's on the app store is one of or a combination of these three categories, ultimately resulting in me virtually never downloading new apps.

    Am I being too picky or has the app store taken a turn for the worse when ads and in-app purchases were allowed?
     
  2. Bromio macrumors 6502

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    Jun 6, 2014
    #2
    No. My situation is pretty close to yours.
     
  3. puma1552 thread starter macrumors 601

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    Nov 20, 2008
    #3
    The other thing is I hate the app fragmentation - if I can't install it on both iPad/iPhone, I won't get it.
     
  4. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #4
    I can accept the app fragmentation. I have apps that are universal, but I don't use them on the iPad. Like for example, Reeder. I usually read through the titles, and then send the stuff I want to read later to my Reading List, which I deal with later on the iPad or Mac.

    Same thing with weather apps. There's no point in having them on two devices because of the double notifications.

    Some of the free games I'll tolerate, especially if they have an IAP to remove ads. I don't like stuff connected to an online service though and try and stay away from them.

    Some people want to play games on mobile devices, some don't. I don't see a problem there, they both target different audiences.
     
  5. IrishVixen macrumors 68020

    IrishVixen

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    Jun 20, 2010
    #5
    Well, not all free apps have ads, so I won't write off an app for that until I've actually tried it out. And even then, if there are free and paid versions, I'll certainly try the free one first to make sure the app fits my needs/performs as advertised before I'll pay to remove any ads.

    (Fragmentation bothers me to no end in paid apps though--Fantastical 2 is a good example of how not to sell an app as far as I'm concerned. Can't try without buying, expensive compared to some competitors, and separate iPhone/iPad apps.)

    In app purchases can be well done.... in some cases. If I can buy just the features I'll use for less than buying the full app, that's a win in my book. I've done that recently with two different apps and been very happy to have the option to save a few bucks by not paying for options I didn't need.

    Games are hit or miss for me, but there are always going to be app categories that some people use and some don't. I don't see that as being picky.
     
  6. Donka macrumors 68020

    Donka

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    #6
    There are some genuinely amazing apps out there that just work or do a great job. I think I have > 100 apps installed on my iPad but I know about 10 are instant installs for me and the rest are handy to have on occasion.
     
  7. Irishman macrumors 68030

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    #7
    Fantastical is a generally well-received and well-reviewed app, so I guess the takeaway here is that you can't please everyone all the time.
     
  8. puma1552 thread starter macrumors 601

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    Nov 20, 2008
    #8
    I should note that while I hate app fragmentation and avoid it at all costs, I do have two iPhone only apps, namely uber for calling a cab when I'm out drinking and a calorie counter (would hate to have to sync that between two devices so just the phone app is fine for this)

    That's a good point, but I feel like you can spend $10-$15 on in app purchases on a $1 app whereas back in the day you'd get the full app for $2 or $3.

    One other control freak pickiness I have is that if an app is just a substitute for a website (CNN, NY Times, etc.), I won't get that either since it seems redundant against safari and since the mobile safari experience is supposed to be so good and similar to a real computer's safari.
     
  9. BenTrovato macrumors 68020

    BenTrovato

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    Jun 29, 2012
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    Canada
    #9
    You could call it being too picky but a lot of apps are useless and could be more of a want than a need. When that's the case people will come up with a bunch of different reasons why they shouldn't get it - I have a console, I hate ads, I don't like app fragmentation etc etc. If you have a need for an app and have a genuine use for it, you buy it because the value you is there. If there is a real value for an app that allows you to be more productive and you don't buy it, then it doesn't make any sense.
     
  10. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    Ad supported apps I'll use (as long as the ad isn't obstructive) and I'm not bothered about fragmentation either. What I am bothered about is freemium apps. A horrible, horrible practice that needs to be stopped. I refuse to use them.
     
  11. Donka macrumors 68020

    Donka

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    #11
    The problem with Freemium games is they typically structure them to make money which adversely impacts how the game plays. Not all Freemium titles are like this but the majority are.
    I prefer to pay up front for the full game experience or games that have in app purchases for additional items that are in no way required to play or to progress in the game e.g. a different model of car in a racing game or a different type of plane in a flight sim.
     
  12. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    #12
    The problem with lite versions and trials is that it prompts people to try out an app, and then submit useless feedback to the developer. They either want the paid features in the lite version, or they ask for the paid app to be free or cheaper.

    Could you imagine getting 100,000 support requests like that a day?
     
  13. IrishVixen macrumors 68020

    IrishVixen

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    Jun 20, 2010
    #13
    Freemiums generally don't bother me, because they offer the chance to try a more expensive app out before committing to it. I have zero issue with paying for an app--I worked in software for years, and devs need to eat too!--but I resent buying expensive apps that end up not meeting my particular needs.

    Freemium games DO irritate me, but the few I play are mostly structured around the idea that you can get everything in the game through patience if you're not willing to spend money. I'd rather buy the game itself and not deal with that, but I can live with it if I enjoy the game enough.

    Ads, on the other hand, I have no tolerance for. I gladly pay to be rid of those.

    Not disagreeing that it's probably a quality app--a number of people here rave about it, and it certainly gets good reviews elsewhere. But I have a problem with their business model, no matter how excellent their app may be.

    A $1-2 app is an impulse buy for most people; if you don't like it, it's annoying, but not the end of the world. Fantastical (and its closest competitors) are out of that range, so yes, I did actually reason through the decision to buy more carefully. It was the only one that did not offer a chance to try it out without commitment, and the only one I considered that didn't come in a universal version, which not coincidentally helped make it the most expensive option I was looking at. At that point, it was a no brainer to pick one of the others with near identical features...no matter how excellent Fantastical's fanboys think their favorite app is.

    It may be the most perfect app ever created. But no, it won't get the chance to please everyone all the time, because the devs chose to take the fragmentation route and go for the money grab. Hey, more power to them, it's a free market economy and that's their choice to make. But as such, they guarantee they'll lose a certain percentage of potential customers who hate that model, just as some people avoid freemiums, and some avoid apps with ads.

    Ugh...that would seriously suck. Entitlement nowadays is rampant. Obviously there are times I think paid versions are too expensive (see above), but it would never occur to me to ping the dev about it; I just move on to another app.
     
  14. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

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    Oct 31, 2009
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    #14
    The Windows Phone Marketplace suffers greatly from people leaving bad reviews because of trials they liked but won't buy. It was sad to shift through them. It's just as bad as going through Amazon Appstore reviews.

    Fantastical is great. I probably wouldn't use it on an iPad if it was universal though. It looks like it would feel too much like a wall/dock app.
     
  15. Traverse macrumors 604

    Traverse

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2013
    Location:
    Here
    #15
    I don't mind free with one IAP because I've spent money on a lot of apps that turned out to be crap. I'd rather pay upfront for apps that I know are good, but the whole app store structure kind of bugs me.

    A developer makes a great app and sells it for $0.99-$2.99 and is expected to deliver unlimited support. I don't want a subscription style, but how do developers make much money when the pool dries up? They make a new version as a separate app and then have people moan and groan.

    I support small developers when I can. I got the app MacHash for news and it was free with one small ad banner. I paid the fee to remove ads just because I wanted to support the developer.
     
  16. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

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    Sep 21, 2012
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    In the middle of several books.
    #16
    If you don't like what you see in the app store, why are you seeking validation from strangers? Make up your own mind.
     
  17. Bealala macrumors newbie

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    Nov 20, 2014
    #17
    So you basically want the App Store to be filled with paid apps without in-app purchases?
     
  18. daytona macrumors regular

    daytona

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    Jul 6, 2008
    #18
    I see everyone's point and agree with them. It's too vast and cumbersome. I have had an iPad forever but do not use it. So my little input is insignificant. I was going a trip last year (2013) and had heard a friend of mine mentioning that he watched movies from his iPad. WOW, I thought hat would be great and pursued to look into that and came p with a nice little free app that let me watch a few movies on the long flight out and back. This year (just this month) I had to fly out there again, so...waa laa...take the iPad and get a few movies (bootlegged of course). Which I did BUT they had no sound. :(
    Now at home I find that that app is no longer supported and tried another app suggested on a "forum". Loading the movies to try worked very easy, BUT now each movie I hit the "play" and it automatically wants a $9.99 up grade to play it. WTH?...just venting. I'll wait and read more to see what comes by or up.
     
  19. Ken Kaniff macrumors regular

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    Nov 8, 2014
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    Connecticut

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