Amy Pascal's very accurate comments on workplace pay

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by tzhu07, Feb 13, 2015.

  1. tzhu07 macrumors regular

    tzhu07

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    #1
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/...tml?utm_hp_ref=entertainment&ir=Entertainment

    She was specifically talking about Jennifer Lawrence and women, but I find this statement holds true for anyone within the workplace.

    "Here’s the problem: I run a business. People want to work for less money, I'll pay them less money. I don't call them up and say, 'Can I give you some more?' Because that's not what you do when you run a business. The truth is, what women have to do is not work for less money. They have to walk away. People shouldn't be so grateful for jobs. ... People should know what they’re worth."
     
  2. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #2
    Acting like the 'be grateful you have a job' thing is gender related these days is funny.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #3
    The comment be grateful you have a job is prevalent in all fiends, regardless of gender. I hear it every year when my employer says there's little money to provide for raises.
     
  4. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #4
    I got to clean crap from the bathroom wall three out of the past four days, but I'm supposed to be grateful for the job. I kind of am, but still...
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #5
    I have the same sentiment, I am happy that I have a job, but when executives in my organization get huge bonuses and we're left with just scraps, its kind of demotivating.
     
  6. Scepticalscribe, Feb 13, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2015

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6
    To be honest, that can be hard to do in the private sector, especially if everyone is on different (not to mention individually negotiated) pay grades.

    Actually, this is one of the reasons I generally like to work in the public sector - systems of pay are a lot more transparent, and are not at the mercy of fickle employers; moreover, subtle forms of discrimination - such as those which are expressed by different pay rates for individuals on the same grade, or doing the same job - are a lot harder to carry out.

    The old 'I run a business' excuse is great intellectual (and financial) cop-out, fig-leaf and abrogation and denial of responsibility on the part of employers. If employers do indeed 'run a business' and want to 'attract talent', or treat their people as their 'greatest asset', they know full well what they should be paying them, instead of pretending to argue that this is none of their affair. They know because salaries cost money, and what costs money is the 'bottom line'.

    Indeed, if employers pay a proper salary, one that is perceived to be fair, and treat people with respect, a lot of these issues would not arise in the first place. They arise because - while pretending that money matters are really none of their business, many employers in the private sector will seek to take advantage of anything (such as subliminal attitudes on class, or gender, or colour) to make a saving in salaries.
     
  7. CrickettGrrrl macrumors 6502a

    CrickettGrrrl

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    #7
    Your accidental slip is so accurate.

    It does seem sociopathy is running rampant, societally.
     
  8. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #8
    lol Freudian slip indeed :p
     
  9. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    #9
    She is exactly right and it is how I treat jobs. As far as I'm concerned in my mind, my employer is lucky to have me and if I see anything I don't like, I'm out and not coming back.
     
  10. vertisync macrumors newbie

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    Feb 12, 2015
    #10
    People don't just give extra money away to executives because they are kind hearted.

    The executives earn that extra money by providing a value that you don't.

    You shouldn't be demotivated, you should be motivated to get yourself into a position in which you are very valuable to a company.
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #11
    Er, peering somewhat myopically at the detritus and frightful fallout caused by the recent catastrophic global economic crash, I very much doubt that your analysis can be credibly argued.

    Indeed, my sense is that the outrageous sense of arrogant entitlement found among the ranks of some of these self-same executives, along with their bottomless self-regard, their disdain for anything which did not support their astounding worldview all may well have helped contribute to the state of economic collapse - the grim consequences of which we still seem to be grappling with.

    More to the point, some of these gentlemen most certainly are not 'worth it'. Greed and group-think do not guarantee success.

    Put more plainly, I fail to see why individuals who annihilate their businesses, leaving havoc in their wake, through greed and arrogance, can in any way justify any sort of bonus, least of all on the basis of supposed 'talent'.

    Indeed, anything I have read on such matters seems to indicate that it is not just the size of executive bonuses that contributes to employee dissatisfaction and possible disengagement, but also the difference in degree between the best paid and the least well paid individual in a company.
     

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